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Acute injuries in Finnish junior floorball league players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291741
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Mar; 21(3):268-273
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Kati Pasanen
Jussi Hietamo
Tommi Vasankari
Pekka Kannus
Ari Heinonen
Urho M Kujala
Ville M Mattila
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Finland. Electronic address: kati.pasanen@uta.fi.
Source
J Sci Med Sport. 2018 Mar; 21(3):268-273
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ankle Injuries - etiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hockey - injuries
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Knee Injuries - etiology
Ligaments, Articular - injuries
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To investigate the incidence and characteristics of acute time-loss injuries in Finnish junior floorball league players.
Prospective cohort study with 3-year follow-up.
One hundred and eighty-six female and male players (mean age 16.6±1.4) took part in the follow-up study (2011-2014). The training hours and games were recorded on a team diary. Floorball related acute injuries were registered and verified by a research physician. The injury incidence was expressed as the number of injuries per 1000h of exposure. Incidence rate was calculated separately for games and practices, and for males and females.
One hundred and forty-four acute time-loss injuries occurred. Injury incidence was 26.87 (95% CI 20.10-33.63) in junior league games, and 1.25 (95% CI 0.99-1.52) in team practices. Female players had significantly higher game injury rate (IRR 1.88, 1.12-3.19) and joint/ligament injury rate (IRR 1.70, 1.07-2.73) compared to males. Eighty-one percent of the injuries affected the lower limbs. The ankle (37%), knee (18%), and thigh (14%) were the most commonly injured body sites. More than half of injuries involved joint or ligaments (54%). Twenty-six percent of the injuries were severe causing more than 28days absence from sports. Eight anterior cruciate ligament ruptures of the knee occurred among seven female players.
The study revealed that risk of ankle and knee ligament injuries is high in adolescent floorball, specifically among female players.
PubMed ID
28716691 View in PubMed
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Bone density, structure and strength, and their determinants in aging sprint athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122761
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Dec;44(12):2340-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marko T Korhonen
Ari Heinonen
Jaana Siekkinen
Juha Isolehto
Markku Alén
Ilkka Kiviranta
Harri Suominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. marko.t.korhonen@jyu.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Dec;44(12):2340-9
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Athletes
Bone Density - physiology
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Running - physiology
Weight-Bearing - physiology
Abstract
This study was undertaken to examine bone properties in masters sprinters of different ages and younger reference subjects. In addition, the association of sport-specific ground reaction force, muscle, training, and hormone characteristics with the bone parameters was evaluated in the athletes.
Bone densitometric, structural, and strength parameters were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal and midtibia in 83 male sprinters (40-85 yr) and 19 physically active referents (31-45 yr). Between-group differences were analyzed by ANCOVA with body mass and height as covariates.
Bone values were generally greater in athletes than referents, the greatest differences being in bending strength of the tibia shaft as estimated by maximum moment of inertia (Imax). Among athletes, trabecular volumetric bone mineral density of distal tibia was 12% (P
PubMed ID
22776884 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy on activity and participation after stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129773
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Mar;26(3):209-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Sinikka H Peurala
Mari P Kantanen
Tuulikki Sjögren
Jaana Paltamaa
Maarit Karhula
Ari Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Gerontology Research Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. sinikka.peurala@gmail.com
Source
Clin Rehabil. 2012 Mar;26(3):209-23
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Exercise Movement Techniques - methods
Female
Finland
Hemiplegia - etiology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Patient Participation
Prognosis
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Recovery of Function
Restraint, Physical - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Self Care
Stroke - complications - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Treatment Outcome
Upper Extremity
Abstract
To examine the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy and modified constraint-induced movement therapy on activity and participation of patients with stroke (i.e. the effect of different treatment durations and frequency) by reviewing the results of randomized controlled trials.
A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, OTSeeker, CENTRAL and by manual search.
Randomized controlled trials for patients over 18 years old with stroke and published in Finnish, Swedish, English or German were included. Studies were collected up to the first week in May 2011. The evidence was high, moderate, low or no evidence according to the quality of randomized controlled trial and the results of meta-analyses.
Search resulted in 30 papers reporting constraint-induced movement therapy, including 27 randomized controlled trials published between 2001 and 2011. Constraint-induced movement therapy practice for 60-72 hours over two weeks produced better mobility (i.e. ability to carry, move and handle objects) with high evidence compared to control treatment. Constraint-induced movement therapy for 20-56 hours over two weeks, 30 hours over three weeks and 15-30 hours over 10 weeks improved mobility of the affected upper extremity. However, with self-care as an outcome measure, only 30 hours of constraint-induced movement therapy practice over three weeks demonstrated an improvement.
Constraint-induced movement therapy and modified constraint-induced movement therapy proved to be effective on affected hand mobility and to some extent self-care on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health activity and participation component, but further studies are needed to find out the optimal treatment protocols for constraint-induced movement therapy.
PubMed ID
22070990 View in PubMed
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Effects of a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program on the biochemical composition and morphology of cartilage in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115536
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Benjamin Waller
Matti Munukka
Juhani Multanen
Timo Rantalainen
Tapani Pöyhönen
Miika T Nieminen
Ilkka Kiviranta
Hannu Kautiainen
Harri Selänne
Joost Dekker
Sarianna Sipilä
Urho M Kujala
Arja Häkkinen
Ari Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. ben.waller@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2013;14:82
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Biomechanical Phenomena
Body Composition
Cartilage, Articular - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Female
Finland
Humans
Immersion
Knee Joint - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - metabolism - pathology - physiopathology - therapy
Pain Measurement
Physical Examination
Postmenopause
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Swimming Pools
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Symptoms associated with osteoarthritis of the knee result in decreased function, loss of working capacity and extensive social and medical costs. There is a need to investigate and develop effective interventions to minimise the impact of and even prevent the progression of osteoarthritis. Aquatic exercise has been shown to be effective at reducing the impact of osteoarthritis. The purpose of this article is to describe the rationale, design and intervention of a study investigating the effect of an aquatic resistance exercise intervention on cartilage in postmenopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis.
A minimum of 80 volunteers who meet the inclusion criteria will be recruited from the local population through newspaper advertisements. Following initial assessment volunteers will be randomised into two groups. The intervention group will participate in a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program of 1-hour duration 3 times a week for four months. The control group will be asked to maintain normal care during this period. Primary outcome measure for this study is the biochemical composition of knee cartilage measured using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging; T2 relaxation time and delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. In addition, knee cartilage morphology as regional cartilage thickness will be studied. Secondary outcomes include measures of body composition and bone traits using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and peripheral quantitative computed tomography, pain, function using questionnaires and physical performance tests and quality of life. Measurements will be performed at baseline, after the 4-month intervention period and at one year follow up.
This randomised controlled trial will investigate the effect a progressive aquatic resistance exercise program has on the biochemical composition of cartilage in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis. This is the first study to investigate what impact aquatic exercise has on human articular cartilage. In addition it will investigate the effect aquatic exercise has on physical function, pain, bone and body composition and quality of life. The results of this study will help optimise the prescription of aquatic exercise to persons with mild knee osteoarthritis.
ISRCTN65346593.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23497162 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of Overuse Injuries in Youth Team Sports: A 3-year Prospective Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289237
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2017 Oct; 38(11):847-856
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Mari Leppänen
Kati Pasanen
Pekka Kannus
Tommi Vasankari
Urho M Kujala
Ari Heinonen
Jari Parkkari
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere Research Center of Sports Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Sports Med. 2017 Oct; 38(11):847-856
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Basketball - injuries
Child
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Youth Sports
Abstract
Prospective studies on overuse injuries and their impact on athletic training among youth team sports are scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence, severity and player related risk factors of overuse injuries among young (12-20 years) basketball and floorball players. A total of 387 players participated in a 3-year prospective study. Each player completed a baseline questionnaire regarding their background information. Overuse injuries that prevented players to fully or partly participate in their regular training were collected. In all, 204 overuse injuries were registered (injury incidence 1.51 injuries/1?000?h of exposure; 95% CI 1.35-1.78). Most of the injuries involved the knee (35%) and lower back (21%), and were classified as severe (44%). Injury incidence was 1.51 (95% CI 1.2-1.82) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.32-1.91) in basketball and floorball, respectively. Incidence was significantly higher among female compared with male players (incidence rate ratio 1.58; 95% CI 1.20-2.09). Previous injury and playing at adult level were the strongest factors associated with occurrence of an overuse injury. In conclusion, overuse injuries of the knee and low back are relatively common in youth basketball and floorball. Effective prevention strategies as well as training load monitoring is needed in youth team sports.
PubMed ID
28895620 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life and physical activity in persons at high risk for type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154048
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(10):799-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Arja Häkkinen
Anna Kukka
Tanja Onatsu
Salme Järvenpää
Ari Heinonen
Heikki Kyröläinen
Pablo Tomas-Carus
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Central Finland Health Care District, Jyväskylä, Finland. arja.hakkinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(10):799-805
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of persons at risk for type 2 diabetes to that of the Finnish general population. In addition, the associations between physical activity and HRQOL at-risk persons were studied.
One hundred thirty-two at-risk persons were recruited from health care centres in Central Finland. Participants filled out questionnaires including demographic characteristics, HRQOL (SF-36), frequency of vigorous physical activity (
PubMed ID
19034723 View in PubMed
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Improved femoral neck BMD in older Finnish women between 2002 and 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114155
Source
Maturitas. 2013 Jul;75(3):241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Saija Karinkanta
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Author Affiliation
UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland. kirsti.uusi-rasi@uta.fi
Source
Maturitas. 2013 Jul;75(3):241-5
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Body Height
Bone Density
Cohort Studies
Female
Femur Neck - metabolism
Finland - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - metabolism
Abstract
The number of hip fractures among Finns over 50-years of age rose constantly between 1970 and 1997, but since then, there has been a nationwide decline in incidence of hip fractures. One possible explanation, although not the only one, for the declining fracture rates, could be improved bone mineral density (BMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in femoral neck BMD between older Finnish women born about a decade apart.
We compared the baseline data of two population-based samples of home-dwelling 70-80-year-old women who were initially recruited in exercise intervention studies (N=216 in Cohort1, and N=389 in Cohort 2). Femoral neck BMD was measured with DXA. Between-cohort differences were evaluated with analysis of covariance using age, height, weight, and use of hormone therapy as covariates.
The later-born Cohort 2 was somewhat older and taller than Cohort 1. Adjusted mean difference (95% CI) in femoral neck BMD between the cohorts was 0.043g/cm(2) (0.023-0.064) corresponding the mean difference of 0.36 (0.19-0.53) in T-score in favor of Cohort 2.
Despite several factors that basically could have indicated lower mean BMD in Cohort 2, the finding was the opposite. This suggests that the mean femoral neck BMD has increased substantially among older Finnish women within a decade, but primary reason for this improvement remains unclear, but improved social and economic resources may have at least partly accounted for this favorable phenomenon.
PubMed ID
23642771 View in PubMed
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Low Back Pain in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284253
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2016 Sep;26(5):376-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Kati Pasanen
Marleena Rossi
Jari Parkkari
Pekka Kannus
Ari Heinonen
Kari Tokola
Grethe Myklebust
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2016 Sep;26(5):376-80
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Basketball - injuries
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of low back pain (LBP) in young female and male basketball and floorball players.
Cross-sectional study.
Nine basketball teams and 9 floorball teams from Tampere city district, Finland.
Four hundred one young female and male players (mean age: 15.8 ± 1.9 years).
Age, gender, sport, and family history of musculoskeletal disorders were assessed as risk factors for LBP. Adjustment was made on team level to avoid random effects associated with a team.
Information of players' background factors and LBP episodes was collected by a structured questionnaire.
Forty-four percentage of the basketball players and 62% of floorball players had suffered from LBP during the previous 12 months. Prevalence of LBP during the previous year was significantly higher among floorball players (P = 0.001). In both sports, prevalence of pain symptoms was the highest during the competitive playing season. Family history of musculoskeletal disorders [OR (odds ratio), 2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.22-3.34] and higher age (OR, 1.22, 95% CI, 1.05-1.41) were associated with LBP in players.
The study attested that LBP is a relatively common complaint in young team sport players. Targeted measures to examine causes, risk factors, and prevention of LBP in youth sports are needed.
PubMed ID
26513389 View in PubMed
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Promoting mobility after hip fracture (ProMo): study protocol and selected baseline results of a year-long randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129064
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sarianna Sipilä
Anu Salpakoski
Johanna Edgren
Ari Heinonen
Markku A Kauppinen
Marja Arkela-Kautiainen
Sanna E Sihvonen
Maija Pesola
Taina Rantanen
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. sarianna.sipila@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Hip Joint - physiopathology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Range of Motion, Articular
Recovery of Function
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To cope at their homes, community-dwelling older people surviving a hip fracture need a sufficient amount of functional ability and mobility. There is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery after hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to describe the design, intervention and demographic baseline results of a study investigating the effects of a rehabilitation program aiming to restore mobility and functional capacity among community-dwelling participants after hip fracture.
Population-based sample of over 60-year-old community-dwelling men and women operated for hip fracture (n = 81, mean age 79 years, 78% were women) participated in this study and were randomly allocated into control (Standard Care) and ProMo intervention groups on average 10 weeks post fracture and 6 weeks after discharged to home. Standard Care included written home exercise program with 5-7 exercises for lower limbs. Of all participants, 12 got a referral to physiotherapy. After discharged to home, only 50% adhered to Standard Care. None of the participants were followed-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery. ProMo-intervention included Standard Care and a year-long program including evaluation/modification of environmental hazards, guidance for safe walking, pain management, progressive home exercise program and physical activity counseling. Measurements included a comprehensive battery of laboratory tests and self-report on mobility limitation, disability, physical functional capacity and health as well as assessments for the key prerequisites for mobility, disability and functional capacity. All assessments were performed blinded at the research laboratory. No significant differences were observed between intervention and control groups in any of the demographic variables.
Ten weeks post hip fracture only half of the participants were compliant to Standard Care. No follow-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery occurred. There is a need for rehabilitation and follow-up for mobility recovery after hip fracture. However, the effectiveness of the ProMo program can only be assessed at the end of the study.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN53680197.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22145912 View in PubMed
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