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Academic achievement and smoking: is self-efficacy an important factor in understanding social inequalities in Finnish adolescents?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131629
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Nov;39(7):714-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Marjaana Pennanen
Ari Haukkala
Hein De Vries
Erkki Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. marjaana.pennanen@thl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Nov;39(7):714-22
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Attitude
Cognition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Poor academic achievement is strongly related to smoking but studies that examine the mechanism between academic achievement and smoking are lacking. The aim of this study, therefore, was to examine the smoking-related cognitions (i.e. attitude, social influence, self-efficacy and intention to smoke) in relation to academic achievement and determine whether these cognitions explain different patterns of smoking.
The study uses the data of a longitudinal study that was carried out in Finland, and the sample comprised 1,096 students in grades seven to nine.
During the seventh-grade students with poor academic achievement reported more positive attitudes to smoking and a greater social influence of their peers regarding smoking, weaker self-efficacy to refuse smoking and more intentions to smoke in the future compared to students with high academic achievement. Moreover, the follow-up analyses after a 24-month interval revealed that self-efficacy to refuse smoking of students with poor grades had become weaker compared to students with high grades. Furthermore, the influence of seventh-grade academic achievement predicting ninth-grade weekly smoking was partially mediated through the self-efficacy beliefs and the intention to smoke.
Differences in academic achievement may have an impact on adolescents' self-efficacy beliefs and the intention to smoke in the future. To reduce health inequalities a strong input on continuing research to improve smoking prevention methods, especially for students with low academic achievement, is needed.
PubMed ID
21893606 View in PubMed
Less detail

Appetitive traits as behavioural pathways in genetic susceptibility to obesity: a population-based cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275595
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Clare Llewellyn
Jane Wardle
Karri Silventoinen
Anni Joensuu
Satu Männistö
Veikko Salomaa
Pekka Jousilahti
Jaakko Kaprio
Markus Perola
Ari Haukkala
Source
Sci Rep. 2015;5:14726
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Appetite
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Multifactorial Inheritance
Obesity - epidemiology - genetics
Population Surveillance
Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The mechanisms through which genes influence body weight are not well understood, but appetite has been implicated as one mediating pathway. Here we use data from two independent population-based Finnish cohorts (4632 adults aged 25-74 years from the DILGOM study and 1231 twin individuals aged 21-26 years from the FinnTwin12 study) to investigate whether two appetitive traits mediate the associations between known obesity-related genetic variants and adiposity. The results from structural equation modelling indicate that the effects of a polygenic risk score (90 obesity-related loci) on measured body mass index and waist circumference are partly mediated through higher levels of uncontrolled eating (ßindirect = 0.030-0.032, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
26423639 View in PubMed
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Associations of Weight Concerns With Self-Efficacy and Motivation to Quit Smoking: A Population-Based Study Among Finnish Daily Smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270690
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Sep;17(9):1134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Eeva-Liisa Tuovinen
Suoma E Saarni
Taru H Kinnunen
Ari Haukkala
Pekka Jousilahti
Kristiina Patja
Jaakko Kaprio
Tellervo Korhonen
Source
Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Sep;17(9):1134-41
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Cotinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Self Efficacy
Self Report
Smoking - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Tobacco Use Disorder - psychology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Concerns about weight gain occurring after smoking cessation may affect motivation and self-efficacy towards quitting smoking. We examined associations of smoking-specific weight concerns with smoking cessation motivation and self-efficacy in a population-based cross-sectional sample of daily smokers.
Six-hundred biochemically verified (blood cotinine) current daily smokers comprising 318 men and 282 women aged 25-74 years, were studied as part of the National FINRISK (Finnish Population Survey on Risk Factors on Chronic, Noncommunicable Diseases) study and its DIetary, Lifestyle and Genetic factors in the development of Obesity and Metabolic syndrome (DILGOM) sub-study that was conducted in Finland in 2007. Self-reported scales were used to assess weight concerns, motivation and self-efficacy regarding the cessation of smoking. Multiple regression analyses of concerns about weight in relation to motivation and self-efficacy were conducted with adjustments for sex, age (years), body mass index (BMI, [kg/m(2)]), physical activity (times per week), and further controlled for nicotine dependence (Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence).
Higher levels of weight concerns were associated with lower self-efficacy (ß = -0.07, p
PubMed ID
25542916 View in PubMed
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Changes in psychological resources moderate the effect of socioeconomic status on distress symptoms: a 10-year follow-up among young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121280
Source
Health Psychol. 2013 Jun;32(6):627-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Olli Kiviruusu
Taina Huurre
Ari Haukkala
Hillevi Aro
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. olli.kiviruusu@thl.fi
Source
Health Psychol. 2013 Jun;32(6):627-36
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Occupations
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Self Concept
Social Class
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on changes in psychological resources and whether these changes in turn moderate the effect of SES on distress symptoms in a prospective 10-year follow-up among young adults.
Subjects (N = 1239) were participants in two phases (1989, 22 years; 1999, 32 years) of a Finnish cohort study. The measurements were SES (basic education at 22 years, occupation at 32 years), distress symptoms (index of 17 somatic and mental complaints), and psychological resources (self-esteem, meaningfulness, locus of control).
The results showed that lower SES is associated with poorer psychological resources both concurrently and prospectively. Lower SES at age 22 also predicted slower resource development, but only among females. In prospective analyses among both genders, changes in psychological resources moderated the effect of SES on distress symptoms: for those with losses in psychological resources, lower SES was associated with greater increases in distress between 22 and 32 years of age, whereas for those with stable or increasing resources, no effects of SES on distress were found.
The results indicate that higher SES is associated with more favorable changes in psychological resources. In a longitudinal setting, SES differences in health seem to increase only when psychological resources decrease during the same period. The results emphasize the importance of dynamic conceptualizations of psychological resources in SES-health research.
PubMed ID
22924450 View in PubMed
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Comparing sense of coherence, depressive symptoms and anxiety, and their relationships with health in a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158302
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(12):2401-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Ari Haukkala
Antti Uutela
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Psychology, University of Helsinki, Unioninkatu 37, P.O. Box 54, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jun;66(12):2401-12
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Abstract
The strong negative correlations observed between the sense of coherence (SOC) scale and measures of depression and anxiety raise the question of whether the SOC scale inversely measures the other constructs. The main aim of the present study was to examine the discriminant validity of the three measures by comparing their associations with health indicators and behaviours. The participants were 25 to 74-year-old Finnish men (n=2351) and women (n=2291) from the National Cardiovascular Risk Factor Survey conducted in 1997. The SOC scale had high inverse correlations with both depression (r=-0.62 among both men and women) and anxiety measures (r=-0.57 among the men and r=-0.54 among the women). Although confirmatory factor analyses suggested that it was possible to differentiate between SOC, cognitive depressive symptoms and anxiety, the estimated correlations were even higher than those mentioned above. Education was related only to SOC, but the associations of SOC, cognitive depressive symptoms and anxiety with self-reported and clinically measured health indicators (body mass index, blood pressure, cholesterol) and health behaviours were almost identical. The variation in the lowest SOC tertile was more strongly associated with health variables than in the highest tertile. To conclude, the size of the overlap between the SOC and depression scales was the same as between depression and anxiety measures. This indicates that future studies should examine the discriminant validity of different psychosocial scales more closely, and should compare them in health research in order to bring parallel concepts into the same scientific discussion.
PubMed ID
18336974 View in PubMed
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Depression, emotional eating and long-term weight changes: a population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302014
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 03 20; 16(1):28
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-20-2019
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Tatjana van Strien
Satu Männistö
Pekka Jousilahti
Ari Haukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Nutrition, P.O. Box 66, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 03 20; 16(1):28
Date
03-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Depression - epidemiology
Eating - psychology
Emotions
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Weight Gain
Abstract
Emotional eating (i.e. eating in response to negative emotions) has been suggested to be one mechanism linking depression and subsequent development of obesity. However, studies have rarely examined this mediation effect in a prospective setting and its dependence on other factors linked to stress and its management. We used a population-based prospective cohort of adults and aimed to examine 1) whether emotional eating mediated the associations between depression and 7-year change in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and 2) whether gender, age, night sleep duration or physical activity moderated these associations.
Participants were Finnish 25- to 74-year-olds who attended the DILGOM study at baseline in 2007 and follow-up in 2014. At baseline (n?=?5024), height, weight and WC were measured in a health examination. At follow-up (n?=?3735), height, weight and WC were based on measured or self-reported information. Depression (Center for Epidemiological Studies - Depression Scale), emotional eating (Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18), physical activity and night sleep duration were self-reported. Age- and gender-adjusted structural equation models with full information maximum likelihood estimator were used in the analyses.
Depression and emotional eating were positively associated and they both predicted higher 7-year increase in BMI (R2?=?0.048) and WC (R2?=?0.045). The effects of depression on change in BMI and WC were mediated by emotional eating. Night sleep duration moderated the associations of emotional eating, while age moderated the associations of depression. More specifically, emotional eating predicted higher BMI (P?=?0.007 for the interaction) and WC (P?=?0.026, respectively) gain in shorter sleepers (7 h or less), but not in longer sleepers (9 h or more). Depression predicted higher BMI (P?
PubMed ID
30894189 View in PubMed
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Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271271
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Ari Haukkala
Agneta Yngve
Inga Thorsdottir
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Diet - standards
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Friends
Fruit
Humans
Male
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.
PubMed ID
26450715 View in PubMed
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Eating styles, self-control and obesity indicators. The moderating role of obesity status and dieting history on restrained eating.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151058
Source
Appetite. 2009 Aug;53(1):131-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Ari Haukkala
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Karri Silventoinen
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Psychology, Unionink. 37 (P.O. Box 54), 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Appetite. 2009 Aug;53(1):131-4
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Diet, Reducing
Eating - psychology
Emotions
Female
Finland
Humans
Inhibition (Psychology)
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Waist Circumference
Weight Loss
Abstract
We examined whether obesity status and dieting history affected the associations of eating styles with measured obesity indicators and self-control among Finnish men (n = 2325) and women (n = 2699) aged 25-75 years. Uncontrolled and emotional eating were positively associated with obesity and reversely with self-control. Among obese subjects and current/past dieters, higher restrained eating was related to lower adiposity, uncontrolled and emotional eating, and higher self-control while these associations were opposite among normal weight subjects and never dieters. These results suggest that restrained eating may be related to better weight control among those who need and/or are motivated to lose weight while among others it may indicate problems with eating.
PubMed ID
19433123 View in PubMed
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Emotional eating and physical activity self-efficacy as pathways in the association between depressive symptoms and adiposity indicators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140574
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1031-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Karri Silventoinen
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Satu Männistö
Ari Haukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Nov;92(5):1031-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers
Body Weights and Measures
Depression - complications
Emotions
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Obesity - psychology
Self Efficacy
Abstract
There is increasing evidence that depressive symptoms and obesity are positively related, but the mechanisms that explain the association between them are unclear.
We examined direct and indirect associations between depressive symptoms, emotional eating, physical activity (PA) self-efficacy (ie, an individual's confidence in his or her ability to overcome barriers to maintain PA behaviors), and adiposity indicators.
Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized mediation model in Finnish men (n = 2312) and women (n = 2674) aged 25-74 y from the National Cardiovascular Risk Factor Survey conducted in 2007. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18, and a PA barriers self-efficacy scale were used. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and percentage body fat of participants were measured in a health examination.
Depressive symptoms and emotional eating had positive correlations and PA self-efficacy had negative correlations with BMI, WC, and percentage body fat. Elevated depressive symptoms were related to higher emotional eating (ß = 0.38 for men and 0.31 for women) and lower PA self-efficacy (ß = -0.41 for men and -0.31 for women), whereas emotional eating and PA self-efficacy were inversely correlated (r = -0.12 and -0.18, respectively). The positive bivariate associations between depressive symptoms and adiposity indicators became nonsignificant in models that included emotional eating and PA self-efficacy, and both of these factors significantly mediated the effects of depressive symptoms on adiposity indicators.
Psychological factors related to both eating and PA may be relevant in explaining the positive relation between depressive symptoms and adiposity. Interventions that target obesity should take into account the effects of these factors on weight regulation.
PubMed ID
20861176 View in PubMed
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Emotional eating, depressive symptoms and self-reported food consumption. A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145559
Source
Appetite. 2010 Jun;54(3):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Hanna Konttinen
Satu Männistö
Sirpa Sarlio-Lähteenkorva
Karri Silventoinen
Ari Haukkala
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Psychology, University of Helsinki, Unionink. 37 (P.O. Box 54), 00014 Helsinki, Finland. hanna.konttinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Appetite. 2010 Jun;54(3):473-9
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Depression - psychology
Diet Records
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Eating - psychology
Emotions
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Waist Circumference
Abstract
We examined the associations of emotional eating and depressive symptoms with the consumption of sweet and non-sweet energy-dense foods and vegetables/fruit, also focusing on the possible interplay between emotional eating and depressive symptoms. The participants were 25-64-year-old Finnish men (n=1679) and women (n=2035) from the FINRISK 2007 Study (DILGOM substudy). The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire-R18, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and a 132-item Food Frequency Questionnaire were used. Emotional eating and depressive symptoms correlated positively (r=0.31 among men and women), and both were related to a higher body mass. Emotional eating was related to a higher consumption of sweet foods in both genders and non-sweet foods in men independently of depressive symptoms and restrained eating. The positive associations of depressive symptoms with sweet foods became non-significant after adjustment for emotional eating, but this was not the case for non-sweet foods. Depressive symptoms, but not emotional eating, were related to a lower consumption of vegetables/fruit. These findings suggest that emotional eating and depressive symptoms both affect unhealthy food choices. Emotional eating could be one factor explaining the association between depressive symptoms and consumption of sweet foods, while other factors may be more important with respect to non-sweet foods and vegetables/fruit.
PubMed ID
20138944 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.