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Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278936
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 May;22(5):810-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Niina Putkuri
Anu Kantele
Lev Levanov
Ilkka Kivistö
Markus Brummer-Korvenkontio
Antti Vaheri
Olli Vapalahti
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 May;22(5):810-7
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Bunyaviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Finland - epidemiology
Geography
Humans
Immunoglobulin M - immunology
Incidence
Orthobunyavirus - classification - genetics - immunology
Population Surveillance
Retrospective Studies
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Serogroup
Abstract
Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001-2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (
Notes
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PubMed ID
27088268 View in PubMed
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An autochthonous case of cystic echinococcosis in Finland, 2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271261
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(42)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sari Hämäläinen
Anu Kantele
Miika Arvonen
Tapio Hakala
Jari Karhukorpi
Jukka Heikkinen
Ensio Berg
Kari Vanamo
Erja Tyrväinen
Tarja Heiskanen-Kosma
Antti Oksanen
Antti Lavikainen
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(42)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Dogs - parasitology
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - parasitology - surgery
Echinococcus - genetics - isolation & purification
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Male
Pleural effusion
Radiography, Thoracic
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography
Abstract
We report a case of pulmonary cystic echinococcosis in a child from eastern Finland with no history of travelling abroad. The cyst was surgically removed and the organism molecularly identified as Echinococcus canadensis genotype G10. This parasite is maintained in eastern Finland in a sylvatic life cycle involving wolves and moose; in the present case, the infection was presumably transmitted by hunting dogs.
PubMed ID
26538367 View in PubMed
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Antibody responses against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus after sequential vaccination with pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines in Finnish healthcare professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121384
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):431-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Mari Strengell
Niina Ikonen
Thedi Ziegler
Anu Kantele
Veli-Jukka Anttila
Ilkka Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Virology Unit, Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. mari.strengell@thl.fi
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013 May;7(3):431-8
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - immunology
Antibody formation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Personnel
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Middle Aged
Phylogeny
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus has been circulating in human population for three epidemic seasons. During this time, monovalent pandemic and trivalent seasonal influenza vaccination against this virus have been offered to Finnish healthcare professionals. It is, however, unclear how well vaccine-induced antibodies recognize different strains of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 circulating in the population and whether the booster vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine would broaden the antibody cross-reactivity.
Influenza vaccine-induced humoral immunity against several isolates of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was analyzed in healthcare professionals. Age-dependent responses were also analyzed.
Influenza viruses were selected to represent viruses that circulated in Finland during two consecutive influenza epidemic seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Serum samples from vaccinated volunteers, age 20-64 years, were collected before and after vaccination with AS03-adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine that was given 1 year later.
Single dose of pandemic vaccine induced a good albeit variable antibody response. On day 21 after vaccination, depending on the virus strain, 14-75% of vaccinated had reached antibody titers (=1:40) considered seroprotective. The booster vaccination 1 year later with a seasonal vaccine elevated the seroprotection rate to 57-98%. After primary immunization, younger individuals (20-48 years) had significantly higher antibody titers against all tested viruses than older persons (49-64 years) but this difference disappeared after the seasonal booster vaccination.
Even a few amino acid changes in influenza A HA may compromise the vaccine-induced antibody recognition. Older adults (49 years and older) may benefit more from repeated influenza vaccinations.
PubMed ID
22913369 View in PubMed
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Approach to non-invasive sampling in dengue diagnostics: exploring virus and NS1 antigen detection in saliva and urine of travelers with dengue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264663
Source
J Clin Virol. 2014 Nov;61(3):353-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Essi M Korhonen
Eili Huhtamo
Anna-Maija K Virtala
Anu Kantele
Olli Vapalahti
Source
J Clin Virol. 2014 Nov;61(3):353-8
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Dengue - diagnosis
Dengue Virus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Male
Molecular Sequence Data
RNA, Viral - analysis - genetics
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Saliva - virology
Sensitivity and specificity
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Serum - virology
Travel
Urine - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Dengue diagnostics currently relies on serum and plasma tests. Although the proof of concept for detecting dengue virus (DENV) RNA and nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen from urine and saliva has been demonstrated, few studies have explored their use in diagnostics.
To investigate the occurrence, excretion kinetics, and diagnostic potential of DENV-RNA and NS1 antigen in the urine and saliva of dengue patients.
We examined serial serum, urine (n=50) and saliva (n=48) samples of 14 Finnish travelers with dengue. All samples were analyzed by NS1 ELISA and DENV RT-PCR, and the first and last serum specimens were tested for DENV IgG and IgM. In addition, biochemical parameters were studied from the urine and clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected.
DENV-NS1 protein and RNA proved detectable from saliva and urine using tests developed for serum samples. RNA/NS1 detection showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 64%/54% and 60%/56% for urine and saliva, respectively. RNA analyses performed on days 7-13 after onset of symptoms revealed the sensitivity for urine (72%) to be greater than for serum (31%) or saliva (50%). The concentration of urine samples had no impact on RNA detection.
Noninvasive sampling enables an alternative approach to dengue diagnostics. The performance of the NS1 antigen assay may be improved by optimizing it for urine and saliva samples. The prolonged excretion of DENV-RNA in urine extends the sampling time window for molecular diagnostics and surveillance.
PubMed ID
25242312 View in PubMed
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A closer look at travellers' infections abroad: Finnish nationwide data with incidences, 2010 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282463
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2017 Jan - Feb;15:29-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heli Siikamäki
Pia Kivelä
Mikael Fotopoulos
Anu Kantele
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2017 Jan - Feb;15:29-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa
Asia
Communicable disease control
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Fever - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Information Storage and Retrieval
Male
Morbidity
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Travel
Vaccines
Abstract
Although infections represent the most common health problem of travellers abroad, data on morbidity and incidences of various infections are scarce.
Data on infections of Finnish travellers during 2010-2012 were retrieved from the database of SOS International, an assistance organization covering 95% of Finns requiring aid abroad. The study included 30,086 cases. For incidence calculation, the data were linked to the numbers of Finns visiting these regions during the same period as recorded by the Official Statistics of Finland.
The incidence of infections was particularly high in Africa, southern Europe plus the eastern Mediterranean, and Asia plus Oceania. The most frequent diagnoses were acute gastroenteritis (38.0%) and respiratory-tract infections (RTI) (34.5%), followed by infections of the ear (12.6%), skin or subcutaneous tissue (5.1%), urogenital tract (4.2%), eye (3.1%), and systemic febrile infections (2.2%). Vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) accounted for 0.8% of cases, with varicella as most (49%) and influenza as second-most (27%) common.
Incidence of infections was higher in southern than in eastern and western Europe. Gastroenteritis and RTI proved the most frequent diagnoses, whereas systemic febrile infections were uncommon. Despite pre-travel immunizations, VPDs still occurred; pre-travel consultation should cover both varicella and influenza.
PubMed ID
27773779 View in PubMed
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Dengue in travelers: kinetics of viremia and NS1 antigenemia and their associations with clinical parameters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259766
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e65900
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Elina O Erra
Essi M Korhonen
Liina Voutilainen
Eili Huhtamo
Olli Vapalahti
Anu Kantele
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(6):e65900
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Dengue - blood - immunology - virology
Dengue Virus - immunology
Female
Finland
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Immunoglobulin M - blood
Male
Middle Aged
RNA, Viral - blood
Time Factors
Travel
Viral Load
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - blood
Viremia - blood - immunology - virology
Abstract
Despite the increasing numbers of travel-acquired dengue, few studies have assessed virologic markers of the disease in non-endemic populations. We examined the kinetics of diagnostic markers and their associations with clinical parameters in 93 patients with travel-acquired dengue fever. Kinetics analyses suggested a longer average duration for viremia (9 days, CI95%: 8-10) and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) antigenemia (15 days, CI95%: 12-20) than reported in endemic populations. While none of the tests sufficed alone, the best diagnostic coverage was achieved by combining antibody detection with RNA or NS1 testing. Studied by regression models, early relative levels of viremia and NS1 antigenemia proved to be significantly associated with several clinical parameters: high viremia predicted greater likelihood and increased length of hospitalization, the degree of NS1 antigenemia correlated positively with hematocrit and liver transaminases, and both viremia and NS1 antigenemia levels negatively with platelet counts in follow-up. Levels of viremia and NS1 antigenemia may serve as predictors of the clinical manifestations in travel-acquired dengue.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23755291 View in PubMed
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Destination specific risks of acquisition of notifiable food- and waterborne infections or sexually transmitted infections among Finnish international travellers, 1995-2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296113
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2018 Sep - Oct; 25:35-41
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Viktor Zöldi
Jussi Sane
Anu Kantele
Ruska Rimhanen-Finne
Saara Salmenlinna
Outi Lyytikäinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Security, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland; European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training (EPIET), European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: viktor.zoldi@thl.fi.
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2018 Sep - Oct; 25:35-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Disease Notification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Travel
Waterborne Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
Overnight international travels made by Finns more than doubled during 1995-2015. To estimate risks and observe trends of travel-related notifiable sexually transmitted and food- and water-borne infections (STIs and FWIs) among travellers, we analysed national reports of gonorrhoea, syphilis, hepatitis A, shigellosis, campylobacteriosis and salmonellosis cases and related them to travel statistics.
Cases notified as travel-related to the Finnish infectious diseases register were used as numerators and overnight stays of Statistics Finland surveys as denominator. We calculated overall risks (per 100,000 travellers) and assessed trends (using regression model) in various geographic regions.
Of all travel-related cases during 1995-2015, 2304 were STIs and 70,929 FWIs. During 2012-2015, Asia-Oceania showed highest risk estimates for gonorrhoea (11.0; 95%CI, 9.5-13), syphilis (1.4; 0.93-2.1), salmonellosis (157; 151-164), and campylobacteriosis (135; 129-141), and Africa for hepatitis A (4.5; 2.5-7.9), and shigellosis (35; 28-43). When evaluating at country level, the highest risks of infections was found in Thailand, except for hepatitis A ranking Hungary the first. During 2000-2011, significantly decreasing trends occurred for most FWIs particularly in the European regions and for STIs in Russia-Baltics.
Our findings can be used in targeting pre-travel advice, which should also cover those visiting Thailand or European hepatitis A risk areas.
PubMed ID
29030321 View in PubMed
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Fever in travelers returning from malaria-endemic areas: don't look for malaria only.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133263
Source
J Travel Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;18(4):239-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heli M Siikamäki
Pia S Kivelä
Pyry N Sipilä
Annikaisa Kettunen
M Katariina Kainulainen
Jukka P Ollgren
Anu Kantele
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. heli.siikamaki@hus.fi
Source
J Travel Med. 2011 Jul-Aug;18(4):239-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Communicable Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnosis, Differential
Endemic Diseases
Female
Fever - complications
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Malaria - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Returning travelers with fever pose challenges for clinicians because of the multitude of diagnostic alternatives. Case data in a Finnish tertiary hospital were analyzed in order to define the causes of fever in returned travelers and to evaluate the current diagnostic approach.
A retrospective study of patient records comprised 462 febrile adults who, after traveling in malaria-endemic areas, were admitted to the Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH) emergency room from 2005 to 2009. These patients were identified through requests for malaria smear.
The most common groups of diagnoses were acute diarrheal disease (126 patients/27%), systemic febrile illness (95/21%), and respiratory illness (69/15%). The most common specific main diagnosis was Campylobacter infection (40/9%). Malaria was diagnosed in 4% (20/462). Blood culture was positive for bacteria in 5% of those tested (21/428). Eight patients were diagnosed with influenza. HIV-antibodies were tested in 174 patients (38%) and proved positive in 3% of them (5/174, 1% of all patients). The cause of fever was noninfectious in 12 (3%), remaining unknown in 116 (25%). Potentially life-threatening illnesses were diagnosed in 118 patients (26%), the strongest risk factors were baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) =100 (OR 3.6; 95% CI 2.0-6.4) and platelet count =140 (OR 3.8; 95% CI 2.0-7.3). Nine patients (2%) were treated in high dependency or intensive care units; one died of septicemia. Forty-five patients (10%) had more than one diagnosis.
The high proportion of patients with more than one diagnosis proves the importance of careful diagnostics. Every fourth returning traveler with fever had a potentially life-threatening illness. Septicemia was as common as malaria. The proportion of HIV cases exceeded the prevalence in population for which Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USA (CDC) recommends routine HIV testing. Both blood cultures and HIV tests should be considered in febrile travelers.
PubMed ID
21722234 View in PubMed
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Imported malaria in Finland 2003-2011: prospective nationwide data with rechecked background information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115537
Source
Malar J. 2013;12:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Heli Siikamäki
Pia Kivelä
Outi Lyytikäinen
Anu Kantele
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Aurora Hospital, Helsinki FI-00029, HUS, Finland. heli.siikamaki@hus.fi
Source
Malar J. 2013;12:93
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antimalarials - therapeutic use
Chemoprevention - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Malaria, Falciparum - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Plasmodium falciparum - isolation & purification
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Although described in several reports, imported malaria in Europe has not been surveyed nationwide with overall coverage of patients and individually rechecked background information. Plasmodium falciparum infections have been reported despite regularly taken appropriate chemoprophylaxis, yet the reliability of such questionnaire-based retrospective data has been questioned. This was the starting-point for conducting a prospective nationwide survey of imported malaria where compliance data was double-checked.
Data was collected on all cases of imported malaria confirmed and recorded by the reference laboratory of Finland (population 5.4 million) from 2003 to 2011, and these were compared with those reported to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR). Background information was gathered by detailed questionnaires sent to the clinicians upon diagnosis; missing data were enquired by telephone of clinician or patient. Special attention was paid to compliance with chemoprophylaxis: self-reported use of anti-malarials was rechecked for all cases of P. falciparum.
A total of 265 malaria cases (average annual incidence rate 0.5/100,000 population) had been recorded by the reference laboratory, all of them also reported to NIDR: 54% were born in malaria-endemic countries; 86% were currently living in non-endemic regions. Malaria was mainly (81%) contracted in sub-Saharan Africa. Plasmodium falciparum proved to be the most common species (72%). Immigrants constituted the largest group of travellers (44%). Pre-travel advice was received by 20% of those born in endemic regions and 81% of those from non-endemic regions. Of those with P. falciparum, 4% reported regular use of appropriate chemoprophylaxis (mefloquine or atovaquone/proguanil or doxycycline for regions with chloroquine-resistant and atovaquone/proguanil or doxycycline for regions with mefloquine-resistant P. falciparum); after individual rechecking, however, it was found that none of them had been fully compliant.
Information on compliance with chemoprophylactic regimen cannot be relied on, and it should be rechecked if malaria is suspected. The results of the present study suggest that mefloquine, atovaquone/proguanil and doxycycline are effective as chemoprophylaxis against P. falciparum malaria, when taken conscientiously.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23497115 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.