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A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
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Adult dyslipidemia prediction is improved by repeated measurements in childhood and young adulthood. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Joel Nuotio
Mervi Oikonen
Costan G Magnussen
Jorma S A Viikari
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Antti Jula
Russell Thomson
Matthew A Sabin
Stephen R Daniels
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - blood - physiopathology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dyslipidemias - blood - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipids - blood - chemistry
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prediction of adult dyslipidemia has been suggested to improve with multiple measurements in childhood or young adulthood, but there is paucity of specific data from longitudinal studies.
The sample comprised 1912 subjects (54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had fasting lipid and lipoprotein measurements collected at three time-points in childhood/young adulthood and had at least one follow-up in later adulthood. Childhood/young adult dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) or triglycerides (TG) in the highest quintile, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the lowest quintile. Adult dyslipidemia was defined according to European cut-points (TC > 5.0 mmol/L, LDL-C >3 mmol/L, Non-HDL-C >3.8 mmol/L, HDL-C  1.7 mmol/L). With the exception of triglycerides, Pearson correlation coefficients for predicting adult levels significantly improved when two lipid or lipoprotein measurements in childhood/young adulthood were compared with one measurement (all P 
PubMed ID
25682034 View in PubMed
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Albuminuria and Microalbuminuria as Predictors of Cognitive Performance in a General Population: An 11-Year Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298098
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Laura L Ekblad
Sini Toppala
Jouni K Johansson
Seppo Koskinen
Jouko Sundvall
Juha O Rinne
Pauli Puukka
Matti Viitanen
Antti Jula
Author Affiliation
Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, c/o Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(2):635-648
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk factors
Abstract
Microalbuminuria, defined as urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR)>3.0?mg/mmol and = 30?mg/mmol, is an early marker of endothelial damage of the renal glomeruli. Recent research suggests an association among microalbuminuria, albuminuria (UACR?>?3.0?mg/mmol), and cognitive impairment. Previous studies on microalbuminuria, albuminuria, and cognition in the middle-aged have not provided repeated cognitive testing at different time-points. We hypothesized that albuminuria (micro- plus macroalbuminuria) and microalbuminuria would predict cognitive decline independently of previously reported risk factors for cognitive decline, including cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, we hypothesized that UACR levels even below the cut-off for microalbuminuria might be associated with cognitive functioning. These hypotheses were tested in the Finnish nationwide, population-based Health 2000 Survey (n?=?5,921, mean age 52.6, 55.0% women), and its follow-up, Health 2011 (n?=?3,687, mean age at baseline 49.3, 55.6% women). Linear regression analysis was used to determine the associations between measures of albuminuria and cognitive performance. Cognitive functions were assessed with verbal fluency, word-list learning, word-list delayed recall (at baseline and at follow-up), and with simple and visual choice reaction time tests (at baseline only). Here, we show that micro- plus macroalbuminuria associated with poorer word-list learning and a slower reaction time at baseline, with poorer word-list learning at follow-up, and with a steeper decline in word-list learning during 11 years after multivariate adjustments. Also, higher continuous UACR consistently associated with poorer verbal fluency at levels below microalbuminuria. These results suggest that UACR might have value in evaluating the risk for cognitive decline.
PubMed ID
29480195 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is directly associated with carotid intima-media thickness in Finnish young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Mika Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Jukka Marniemi
Leena Räsänen
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Finland. markus.juonala@utu.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
There is substantial epidemiological data suggesting a J- or U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and coronary events. However, some studies in experimental animals suggest that alcohol may increase atherosclerosis. Therefore, our aim was to study whether alcohol consumption is associated with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, in young, healthy adults.
Alcohol consumption, carotid IMT and conventional cardiovascular risk factors were investigated in 2074 subjects, aged 24-39 years.
In subjects consuming none, >0 to or=4 units of alcohol per day, the respective carotid IMT values were 0.57+/-0.004, 0.59+/-0.003, 0.59+/-0.006, and 0.60+/-0.012 mm (mean+/-S.E.M., P
PubMed ID
19124122 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia and somatization in general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156341
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Jul;70(6):716-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Aino K Mattila
Erkki Kronholm
Antti Jula
Jouko K Salminen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Riitta-Liisa Mielonen
Matti Joukamaa
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, FIN-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. aino.mattila@uta.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2008 Jul;70(6):716-22
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Sentinel Surveillance
Socioeconomic Factors
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Even though the association between alexithymia and somatization seems plausible according to several studies with selected populations, it has not been verified in carefully controlled and nationally representative population studies. We conducted such a study to find out whether alexithymia is associated with somatization at population level.
This study was a part of the Finnish Health 2000 Study. The nationally representative sample comprised 5129 subjects aged 30 to 97 years. Alexithymia was measured with the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and somatic symptom reporting with the 12-item somatization scale derived from the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Sociodemographic and health-related variables, including depressive and anxiety disorders, and physician verified somatic diagnoses, were treated as confounders in multivariate analyses.
Alexithymia was associated with somatization independently of somatic diseases, depression and anxiety and confounding sociodemographic variables. The TAS-20 factor scale "Difficulties Identifying Feelings" was the strongest common denominator between alexithymia and somatization.
This was the first time the independent association between alexithymia and somatization was established in a large, nationally representative nonclinical sample of both young and old adults with and without mental disorders and somatic diseases.
PubMed ID
18596251 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein B, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and LDL particle size in predicting the incidence of metabolic syndrome: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130840
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1296-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Juha Koskinen
Costan G Magnussen
Peter Würtz
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Jorma Sa Viikari
Mika Kähönen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Markku Ahotupa
Terho Lehtimäki
Mika Ala-Korpela
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, Turku, Finland. jkkosk@utu.fi
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1296-303
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To test whether serum apolipoprotein B (apoB) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle characteristics (oxidation and mean particle size) predict the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS).
The 6-year follow-up study included 1429 adults (baseline mean age 31.5). Lipids, apoB, and apoA1 were measured at baseline in 2001. LDL oxidation was measured with monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (oxLDL-prot) and with a method measuring oxidized lipids in LDL (oxLDL-lipids). Mean LDL particle size was calculated from proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.
Increased concentrations of both oxLDL-measures were associated with increased apoB levels but not with LDL particle size. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for MetS incidence during a 6-year follow up by quartiles of apoB were 2.0 (1.0-3.8) for the second quartile, 3.1 (1.7-5.7) for the third quartile, and 4.2 (2.3-7.6) for the fourth quartile. This association remained after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, smoking, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL measures (p?=?0.01) in addition to risk factors comprising the MetS (p?=?0.03). OxLDL-prot and oxLDL-lipids levels were not independently associated with incident MetS after adjusting for apoB. Mean LDL particle size was not associated with the incidence of MetS.
ApoB is associated with increased risk of MetS incidence. We found no clear evidence to suggest that increased LDL oxidation or small mean LDL particle size would facilitate the development of MetS.
PubMed ID
21960651 View in PubMed
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Arterial pulse wave velocity in relation to carotid intima-media thickness, brachial flow-mediated dilation and carotid artery distensibility: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study and the Health 2000 Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131842
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Teemu Koivistoinen
Marko Virtanen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Jula
Markus Juonala
Leena Moilanen
Heikki Aatola
Jari Hyttinen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, FI-33521, Tampere, Finland. teemu.koivistoinen@uta.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Chi-Square Distribution
Compliance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Plethysmography, Impedance
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Pulsatile Flow
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vasodilation
Abstract
Increased arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. The data regarding the relationships between PWV and other indices of vascular damage is limited and partly controversial. We conducted the present study to examine PWV in relation to non-invasive measures of early atherosclerosis (brachial flow-mediated dilation [FMD], carotid intima-media thickness [IMT]) and local arterial stiffness (carotid artery distensibility [Cdist]).
The study population consisted of 1754 young adults (aged 30-45 years, 45.5% males) participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS), and of 336 older adults (aged 46-76 years, 43.2% males) participating in the Health 2000 Survey. FMD was measured only in the YFS cohort. FMD, IMT and Cdist were assessed by ultrasound, and PWV was measured using the whole-body impedance cardiography device.
In young adults, FMD and IMT were not associated with PWV independently of cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, FMD status was not found to modulate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and PWV. In older adults, PWV and IMT were directly and independently associated (?=1.233, p=0.019). In both cohorts, PWV was inversely related with Cdist, and this relation remained significant (p
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):319-2021899842
PubMed ID
21871623 View in PubMed
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Arterial tension time reflects subclinical atherosclerosis, arterial stiffness and stroke volume.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130657
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2011 Nov;31(6):464-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Teemu Koivistoinen
Tiit Kööbi
Leena Moilanen
Antti Jula
Terho Lehtimäki
Jari Hyttinen
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. teemu.koivistoinen@uta.fi
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2011 Nov;31(6):464-71
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asymptomatic Diseases
Cardiography, Impedance
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology
Compliance
Elastic Modulus
Female
Finland
Hemodynamics
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Cardiovascular
Predictive value of tests
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Abstract
To introduce and evaluate a new haemodynamic parameter known as arterial tension time (ATT) and study whether ATT is associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors as well as with indices of arterial stiffness, cardiac pump function and subclinical atherosclerosis.
Arterial tension time was measured from the whole-body impedance cardiography (ICG) signal and defined as the time difference between the onset of arterial distension induced by stroke volume (SV) and maximal integrated arterial distension. As measures of subclinical atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), Young's elastic modulus (YEM), arterial stiffness index (ASI) and carotid artery compliance (CAC) were assessed with ultrasound in 336 Finnish adults (aged 46-76 years, 43·2% men) participating in the Health 2000 Survey. In addition, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and stroke volume index (SI), as indices of arterial stiffness and cardiac pump function, were assessed with ICG.
Arterial tension time was associated inversely with PWV, IMT, YEM and ASI (P
PubMed ID
21981458 View in PubMed
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Association between periodontal condition and hypertension in a non-smoking population aged 30-49 years: results of the Health 2000 Survey in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268493
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Emilia Ollikainen
Tuomas Saxlin
Tellervo Tervonen
Anna Liisa Suominen
Matti Knuuttila
Antti Jula
Pekka Ylöstalo
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 2014 Dec;41(12):1132-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diabetes mellitus
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Smoking
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether periodontal condition is associated with hypertension and systolic blood pressure.
The study population consisted of dentate, non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years (n = 1296) in the national Health 2000 Survey in Finland. The number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) and deep (=6 mm) periodontal pockets and the number of sextants with gingival bleeding were used as explanatory variables. Hypertension and systolic blood pressure were used as outcome variables.
There was no consistent association between the number of teeth with deepened (=4 mm) (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.95-1.01) or deep (=6 mm) (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.90-1.12) periodontal pockets and hypertension after adjusting for confounding factors. Nor was there any essential association between the number of bleeding sextants and hypertension.
Periodontal pocketing and gingival bleeding did not appear to be related to hypertension in non-diabetic, non-smoking individuals aged 30-49 years. Further studies using experimental study designs would be required to determine the role of infectious periodontal diseases in the development or progression of hypertension.
PubMed ID
25256004 View in PubMed
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The association of dietary alpha-linolenic acid with blood pressure and subclinical atherosclerosis in people born small for gestational age: the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264230
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Michael R Skilton
Katja Pahkala
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli Simell
Antti Jula
Harri Niinikoski
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aorta - pathology
Atherosclerosis - blood
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intervention Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
To determine whether dietary alpha-linolenic (omega-3) fatty acid intake is associated with lower blood pressure and aortic intima-media thickness (IMT) in people born small for gestational age (SGA).
Participants were recruited at age 6 months and followed up every 6-12 months until age 19 years. Blood pressure and food records were assessed at each visit. A total of 1009 participants had at least one blood pressure measure and complete birth weight and gestational age data, including 115 (11%) born SGA (birth weight=10th percentile). Aortic IMT was assessed by ultrasound at 19 years (n=413). Analysis was by linear mixed models and multivariable linear regression.
Children born SGA had greater systolic and pulse pressure from age 14 years onwards. In those born SGA, systolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.8-3.3]; P=.001) and pulse pressure 1.4 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.3-2.4]; P=.01), per exponential increase in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) intake; weakened by adjustment for anthropometric measures. Long-term ALA intake was inversely associated with aortic IMT at 19 years in those born SGA (-0.30 mm [95% CI -0.52, -0.08] per exponential greater ALA intake; P=.008), independent of other dietary and anthropometric factors.
Long-term dietary ALA intake during childhood is associated with improved vascular health in people born SGA.
PubMed ID
25702059 View in PubMed
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109 records – page 1 of 11.