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Association of Helicobacter pylori IgA antibodies with the risk of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171090
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2005
Author
Timo U Kosunen
Kari Seppala
Seppo Sarna
Arpo Aromaa
Paul Knekt
Jarmo Virtamo
Anniina Salomaa-Rasanen
Hilpi Rautelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. timo.kosunen@helsinki.fi
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov 21;11(43):6871-4
Date
Nov-21-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Finland
Helicobacter Infections - immunology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - immunology
Middle Aged
Peptic Ulcer - immunology - microbiology
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - immunology - microbiology
Abstract
To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) IgG and IgA antibodies between adult subjects, with defined gastric diseases, non-defined gastric disorders and those representing the population.
Data on H pylori IgG and IgA antibodies, determined by enzyme immunoassay, were analyzed in 3,252 subjects with DGD including 482 patients with gastric ulcer, 882 patients with duodenal ulcer, 1,525 patients with chronic gastritis only and 363 subjects with subsequent gastric cancer, 19,145 patients with NoDg and 4,854 POPUL subjects. The age-adjusted prevalences were calculated for 1- and 20-year age cohorts.
The prevalences of IgG antibodies were equally high (89-96%) in all 20-year age cohorts of the DGD groups, whereas the prevalences of IgG antibodies were lower and increased by age in the POPUL and NoDg groups. The prevalences of IgA antibodies were also higher in the DGD groups; among them CA (84-89%) and GU groups (78-91%) showed significantly higher prevalences than DU (68-77%) and CG patients (59-74%) (OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.86-3.34 between the GU and DU groups). In the CA, GU, and DU groups, the IgA prevalences showed only minor variation according to age, while they increased by age in the CG, POPUL, and NoDg groups (P
PubMed ID
16425400 View in PubMed
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A "screen-and-treat" approach for Helicobacter pylori infection: a population-based study in Vammala, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144781
Source
Helicobacter. 2010 Feb;15(1):28-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Anniina Salomaa-Räsänen
Timo U Kosunen
Arpo R J Aromaa
Paul Knekt
Seppo Sarna
Hilpi Rautelin
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. anniina.salomaa@helsinki.fi
Source
Helicobacter. 2010 Feb;15(1):28-37
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To accelerate the decline of Helicobacter pylori infection, and to study the significance of the possible risk factors for H. pylori infection in Finland, we started a voluntary H. pylori"screen-treat-retest-and-retreat" program for all young adults at primary health care in Vammala, Finland after a pilot study in 1994 including 504 subjects aged 15-75.
A total of 3326 aged 15-40 in 1996, and 716 aged 15 and 584 aged 45 in 1997-2000 were screened for H. pylori using serology. Helicobacter pylori positive were treated, cure was verified by serology.
The eradication rates were 93.8%, 82.2%, and 77.6% per protocol in pilot study in 1994, in subjects invited in 1996 and 1997-2000, respectively. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence rates were calculated to have decreased from 36% to 14% in pilot study, from 12% to 4% among subjects invited in 1996, from 3% to 2% among subjects aged 15 and from 27% to 12% among subjects aged 45 in 1997-2000. An epidemiologic questionnaire in 1996 revealed that crowding in the childhood household, low education of the mother, current smoking and alcohol consumption, unfavorable housing conditions, and sick leaves due to dyspepsia were independently associated with H. pylori infection.
This intervention with high participation rates resulted in a significant decline in calculated H. pylori seroprevalence rates. Although the low prevalence of H. pylori infection may limit the cost efficiency of the program, the intervention is expected to reduce the burden of H. pylori-associated diseases.
PubMed ID
20302587 View in PubMed
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