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Activity limitation and participation restriction in adults seeking hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76071
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2006 Mar 15;28(5):281-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2006
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Geir Jacobsen
Siri Wennberg
Haakon Arnesen
Anders Ringdahl
Lillemor R-M Hallberg
Author Affiliation
ENT Department St. Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofie.Helvik@medsin.ntnu.no
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2006 Mar 15;28(5):281-8
Date
Mar-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Disability Evaluation
Female
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation of Hearing Impaired
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
PURPOSES: We first aimed to describe demographic and audiological characteristics of adults referred to a university hospital for hearing aid (HA) fitting and rehabilitation. Our second aim was to employ an inventory that assesses life consequences of hearing impairment (HI) in terms of perceived activity limitation and participation restriction for the first time in a Norwegian adult outpatient population. A third aim was to study life consequences by audiological and demographic characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: During one year consecutive patients (n = 343) were requested to answer the Hearing Disability and Handicap Scale (HDHS) assessing activity limitation and participation restriction in relation to an audiological examination and medical consultation. The mean threshold of hearing (MTH) was ascertained by pure tone thresholds at 0.5 - 1 - 2 - 4 kHz in the better ear. RESULTS: Activity limitation and participation restriction were both higher for HA experienced than HA naïve subjects ( p
PubMed ID
16492622 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in the vitamin D endocrine system during pregnancy: A longitudinal study of 855 healthy Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291111
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(4):e0195041
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Miriam K Gustafsson
Pål R Romundstad
Signe Nilssen Stafne
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Astrid Kamilla Stunes
Siv Mørkved
Kjell Åsmund Salvesen
Per Medbøe Thorsby
Unni Syversen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(4):e0195041
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
To ensure optimal calcium accrual in the fetal skeleton, a substantial rise occurs in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), but is dependent on sufficient 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D). Large longitudinal studies addressing free 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D during pregnancy are scarce. We aimed to assess levels of and relationship between 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and free 25(OH)D during pregnancy; determinants of vitamin D status; and association between vitamin D indices or PTH and pregnancy outcomes (gestational diabetes mellitus and birthweight). Altogether 855 pregnant Norwegian Caucasian women from Trondheim and Stavanger (latitude 63°N and 58°N) were recruited; 94 were lost to follow-up. The study was originally a randomized controlled trial (2007-2009) with gestational diabetes as primary outcome. Data were collected in second and third trimester. In third trimester, 246 (34%) had vitamin D insufficiency and 52 (7%) deficiency (25(OH)D
Notes
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Cites: Clin Chem Lab Med. 2017 Jan 1;55(1):3-26 PMID 27362963
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Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 May;70(5):685-90 PMID 18771564
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Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Sep;100(9):3356-63 PMID 26161453
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Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2016 May;4(5):393-402 PMID 26944421
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2014 Jul;18(45):1-190 PMID 25025896
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Jun 22;381(9884):2176-83 PMID 23518316
Cites: J Cardiovasc Transl Res. 2013 Aug;6(4):588-603 PMID 23719723
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Jan;135(1):e167-73 PMID 25511121
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jul;99(7):2448-55 PMID 24646102
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Sep;102(6):876-81 PMID 19331703
PubMed ID
29641551 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alterations in the vitamin D endocrine system during pregnancy: A longitudinal study of 855 healthy Norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293428
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(4):e0195041
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Miriam K Gustafsson
Pål R Romundstad
Signe Nilssen Stafne
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Astrid Kamilla Stunes
Siv Mørkved
Kjell Åsmund Salvesen
Per Medbøe Thorsby
Unni Syversen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(4):e0195041
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Diabetes, Gestational - metabolism
Endocrine System
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Norway
Nutritional Status
Parathyroid Hormone - metabolism
Pregnancy - metabolism
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy Trimesters
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vitamin D - metabolism
Vitamin D deficiency
Abstract
To ensure optimal calcium accrual in the fetal skeleton, a substantial rise occurs in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), but is dependent on sufficient 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D). Large longitudinal studies addressing free 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D during pregnancy are scarce. We aimed to assess levels of and relationship between 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and free 25(OH)D during pregnancy; determinants of vitamin D status; and association between vitamin D indices or PTH and pregnancy outcomes (gestational diabetes mellitus and birthweight). Altogether 855 pregnant Norwegian Caucasian women from Trondheim and Stavanger (latitude 63°N and 58°N) were recruited; 94 were lost to follow-up. The study was originally a randomized controlled trial (2007-2009) with gestational diabetes as primary outcome. Data were collected in second and third trimester. In third trimester, 246 (34%) had vitamin D insufficiency and 52 (7%) deficiency (25(OH)D
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Mar 29;11(3):e0152198 PMID 27022948
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 19;357(3):266-81 PMID 17634462
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2012 Jul;70(7):397-409 PMID 22747842
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Jul 24;12 (7):e0180483 PMID 28738090
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Oct;173:105-116 PMID 28093353
Cites: Healthcare (Basel). 2017 Mar 08;5(1): PMID 28282852
Cites: Nutr Bull. 2014 Dec;39(4):322-350 PMID 25635171
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2014 Oct;144 Pt A:138-45 PMID 24239505
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Jul;26(7):1609-16 PMID 21416506
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 May;99(5):1631-7 PMID 24483159
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jan 7;367 (9504):36-43 PMID 16399151
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2015 Aug;173(2):R69-83 PMID 25862787
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):856-64 PMID 23388180
Cites: Clin Nutr. 2015 Oct;34(5):892-8 PMID 25307530
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2017 Sep 15;453:113-130 PMID 28188842
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2012 Jan;119(1):29-36 PMID 22183208
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2006 Mar;91(3):906-12 PMID 16352684
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Aug;98(8):E1283-304 PMID 23922354
Cites: Ther Adv Musculoskelet Dis. 2016 Aug;8(4):124-35 PMID 27493691
Cites: BMJ. 2015 Jun 02;350:h2723 PMID 26037642
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2005 Apr;93(4):519-27 PMID 15946415
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Jul;96(7):1911-30 PMID 21646368
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2014;29(5):1088-95 PMID 24189972
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 2000;894:i-xii, 1-253 PMID 11234459
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Jan;98(1):398-404 PMID 23162094
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Apr;101(4):1729-36 PMID 26895390
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1081-7 PMID 25159824
Cites: Bone Res. 2017 Aug 29;5:17030 PMID 28868163
Cites: Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2012;52(2):103-12 PMID 22059957
Cites: Nutr Rev. 2010 Aug;68(8):465-77 PMID 20646224
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Mar 26;346:f1169 PMID 23533188
Cites: Hormones (Athens). 2010 Apr-Jun;9(2):136-44 PMID 20687397
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(8):e43868 PMID 22937114
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Mar 03;11(3):e0150385 PMID 26938997
Cites: Physiol Rev. 2016 Apr;96(2):449-547 PMID 26887676
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Oct;26(10):2341-57 PMID 21706518
Cites: J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Jun;31(6):1124-7 PMID 27172227
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Apr;174(4):445-52 PMID 26733479
Cites: Ann Lab Med. 2017 Jan;37(1):34-38 PMID 27834063
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Oct;84(10):3666-72 PMID 10523012
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):898-905 PMID 23168244
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 Jul 1;150(1):75-87 PMID 10400557
Cites: BMJ. 2010 Jan 11;340:b5664 PMID 20064851
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Jan 14;(1):CD008873 PMID 26765344
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1986 Oct;63(4):954-9 PMID 3745408
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 1992 Mar;41(3-8):469-77 PMID 1562518
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Feb;43(1):264-9 PMID 24366487
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2010 Jul;104(1):108-17 PMID 20193097
Cites: Clin Chem Lab Med. 2017 Jan 1;55(1):3-26 PMID 27362963
Cites: Lancet. 2014 May 10;383(9929):1665-1676 PMID 24412049
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 May;70(5):685-90 PMID 18771564
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Dec;99(12):4506-13 PMID 25202819
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Sep;100(9):3356-63 PMID 26161453
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):520S-528S PMID 18689394
Cites: Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. 2016 May;4(5):393-402 PMID 26944421
Cites: Health Technol Assess. 2014 Jul;18(45):1-190 PMID 25025896
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Jun 22;381(9884):2176-83 PMID 23518316
Cites: J Cardiovasc Transl Res. 2013 Aug;6(4):588-603 PMID 23719723
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Jan;135(1):e167-73 PMID 25511121
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jul;99(7):2448-55 PMID 24646102
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2009 Sep;102(6):876-81 PMID 19331703
PubMed ID
29641551 View in PubMed
Less detail

Applying clinical guidelines in general practice: a qualitative study of potential complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287058
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Jul 22;17:92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2016
Author
Bjarne Austad
Irene Hetlevik
Bente Prytz Mjølstad
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Jul 22;17:92
Date
Jul-22-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Conflict (Psychology)
Defensive Medicine
Female
Focus Groups
General Practice - methods - standards
General Practitioners - psychology
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Medical Overuse
Medicalization
Middle Aged
Norway
Polypharmacy
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Self Efficacy
Abstract
Clinical guidelines for single diseases often pose problems in general practice work with multimorbid patients. However, little research focuses on how general practice is affected by the demand to follow multiple guidelines. This study explored Norwegian general practitioners' (GPs') experiences with and reflections upon the consequences for general practice of applying multiple guidelines.
Qualitative focus group study carried out in Mid-Norway. The study involved a purposeful sample of 25 Norwegian GPs from four pre-existing groups. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using systematic text condensation, i.e. applying a phenomenological approach.
The GPs' responses clustered around two major topics: 1) Complications for the GPs of applying multiple guidelines; and, 2) Complications for their patients when GPs apply multiple guidelines. For the GPs, applying multiple guidelines created a highly problematic situation as they felt obliged to implement guidelines that were not suited to their patients: too often, the map and the terrain did not match. They also experienced greater insecurity regarding their own practice which, they admitted, resulted in an increased tendency to practice 'defensive medicine'. For their patients, the GPs experienced that applying multiple guidelines increased the risk of polypharmacy, excessive non-pharmacological recommendations, a tendency toward medicalization and, for some, a reduction in quality of life.
The GPs experienced negative consequences when obliged to apply a variety of single disease guidelines to multimorbid patients, including increased risk of polypharmacy and overtreatment. We believe patient-centered care and the GPs' courage to non-comply when necessary may aid in reducing these risks. Health care authorities and guideline developers need to be aware of the potential negative effects of applying a single disease focus in general practice, where multimorbidity is highly prevalent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27449959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are coping strategies and locus of control orientation associated with health-related quality of life in older adults with and without depression?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276290
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 May-Jun;64:130-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Guro Hanevold Bjørkløf
Kirsten Corazzini
Geir Selbæk
Jerson Laks
Truls Østbye
Knut Engedal
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 May-Jun;64:130-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - psychology
Depressive Disorder
Female
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain Measurement
Quality of Life - psychology
Residence Characteristics
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between coping and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in older adults (aged =60?years) with and without depression. This cross-sectional study included 144 depressed inpatients from seven psychogeriatric hospital units in Norway and 106 community-living older adults without depression. HRQoL was measured using Euro Qol Group's EQ-5D Index and visual analog scale (EQ-VAS). Two aspects of coping were of primary interest for HRQoL: locus of control (LOC) and ways of coping (WOC). Measures of depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning, instrumental activities of daily living, and general physical health were included as covariates. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, stronger external LOC was associated with poorer HRQoL in both depressed and non-depressed older adults. In the fully-specified regression models for both groups, the association between stronger external LOC and poorer HRQoL remained significant for the EQ-VAS score but not the EQ-5D Index. WOC was not associated with HRQoL in either group. Total amount of explained variance in fully-specified models was considerably lower in the sample of depressed, hospitalized older adults (17.1% and 15.5% for EQ-5D index and EQ-VAS, respectively), than in the sample of non-depressed, community-based older adults (45.8% and 48.9% for EQ-5D Index and EQ-VAS, respectively). One aspect of coping (LOC orientation) was associated with HRQoL in both depressed and non-depressed older adult samples, and therefore may be an important target for intervention for both groups. Differences in the amount of variance explained in models for the two groups warrant further research.
PubMed ID
26874239 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being stuck in a vice: The process of coping with severe depression in late life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271514
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27187
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Guro Hanevold Bjørkløf
Marit Kirkevold
Knut Engedal
Geir Selbæk
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Source
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being. 2015;10:27187
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Abstract
Articles describing older persons' experiences of coping with severe depression are, to our knowledge, lacking. This article is methodologically grounded in phenomenological hermeneutics, inspired by Paul Ricoeur, and applies a descriptive design with in-depth interviews for producing the data. We included 18 older persons, 13 women and 5 men, with a mean age of 77.9 years, depressed to a severe or moderate degree, 1-2 weeks after admission to a hospital for treatment of depression. We found the metaphor "being in a vice" to capture the essence of meaning from the participants' stories, and can be understood as being stuck in an immensely painful existence entirely dominated by depression in late life. This is the first article where coping in older men and women experiencing the most severe phase of depression is explored.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26119368 View in PubMed
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A comparison of depressive symptoms in elderly medical inpatients and the elderly in a population-based health study (the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130876
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):189-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Knut Engedal
Steinar Krokstad
Eystein Stordal
Geir Selbæk
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofi e.Helvik@ntnu.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;66(3):189-97
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Anxiety Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - complications
Female
Health status
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Risk
Rural Population
Urban Population
Abstract
To compare depression in a sample of the medically hospitalized elderly with elderly people participating in a population-based health study in Norway and further to study the odds for depression, controlling for demographic and health differences between the two samples.
This cross-sectional observational study evaluated 484 medical inpatients from rural areas and 10,765 drawn from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3 (HUNT-3 Study) including participants from rural and urban areas. All participants were elderly (=65 years) with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 80.7 ± 7.4 and 73.3 ± 6.3 years, respectively. Symptoms of depression were screened by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD).
The prevalence of symptoms indicating mild, moderate or more severe depression (depression score =8) was about the same in both groups. In regression analyses, adjusting demographic and health differences, the odds for depression was lower for the elderly in the hospital sample than in the HUNT-3 Study. Older age, male gender, perceiving general health as poor, having impaired ability to function in daily life, previous consultation or treatment for emotional problems and anxiety (anxiety score =8) were associated with increased odds for depression in the elderly independent of being hospitalized or not.
Surprisingly, we found the odds for depression after controlling for demographic and health variables to be lower in the hospitalized elderly individuals than in the elderly participating in the population-based health study. The health variables that were most strongly associated with an increased risk of depression were poor physical health and anxiety.
PubMed ID
21958367 View in PubMed
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A comparison of life satisfaction in elderly medical inpatients and the elderly in a population-based study: Nord-Trondelag Health Study 3.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135640
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jun;39(4):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Knut Engedal
Steinar Krokstad
Geir Selbæk
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofie.Helvik@ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jun;39(4):337-44
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged - psychology
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - prevention & control
Female
Health status
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Mental health
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Social Participation
Abstract
To compare the quality of life (QOL) in terms of overall life satisfaction in elderly medical inpatients and elderly persons in a large population-based study in Norway, and to study the odds for dissatisfaction, controlling for demographic, health, and social variables.
This cross-sectional observation study included 484 medical inpatients and 10,474 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3 (HUNT 3 Study). All participants were 65 years and older. Their life satisfaction was assessed with a single-item measure with seven response categories. For analytical purposes the variable was dichotomised; i.e. dissatisfied vs. satisfied with life.
In the logistic regression analysis controlled for demographic, health, and social variables, the odds for experiencing dissatisfaction with life was significantly increased in the hospital sample compared to the participants in the population-based study (OR 1.4). Poor general health, depression, and anxiety were strongly associated with being dissatisfied with life. Furthermore, disability, previous psychological distress, having no friends who could help, and not participating in activities were all associated with dissatisfaction with life.
The hospitalisation of the elderly has implications for the QOL in terms of life satisfaction, but general physical and psychological health seems to have an even stronger impact on life satisfaction. The prevention of the deterioration of physical and mental health in old age seems to be essential for a good life.
PubMed ID
21459872 View in PubMed
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Cornell's Depression for Dementia Scale: A psychometric study among Norwegian nursing home residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303802
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2021 Mar-Apr; 93:104325
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Geir-Tore Stensvik
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Sigrid Nakrem
Gørill Haugan
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway.. Electronic address: geir.t.stensvik@ntnu.no.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2021 Mar-Apr; 93:104325
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Abstract
Depression is common among residents in long term-care facilities. Therefore, access to a valid and reliable measure of depressive symptoms among nursing home (NH) residents is highly warranted.
The aim of this study was to test the psychometrical properties of the Norwegian version of the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD).
A sample of 309 NH residents were assessed for depressive symptoms using the CSDD in 2015-2016. Data on CSDD were missing for 64 residents, giving an effective sample of 245 (79.3%). Principal component and confirmatory factor analysis were used.
A five-dimensional solution yielded the best fit with the data (?2=174.927, df=94, ?2/df=1.86, p=0.0001, RMSEA=0.058, p-value for test of close fit=0.152, CFI=0.94, TLI=0.92 and SRMR=0.056). As expected, higher depressive symptoms correlated positively with higher scores on the Minimum Data Set Depression Rating Scale (MDSDRS) and correlated negatively with Quality of life assessed with the Quality of Life in Late Stage-Dementia Scale.
The excluded residents (n=64, 20.7%) had lower cognitive function, which may limit the generalizability of the study results.
This study suggests a five-dimensional solution of the CSDD scale. Sixteen of the 19 original items showed highly significant loadings, explaining a notable amount of the variation in the CSDD-construct. Further development and testing of a well-adapted scale assessing depression in the nursing home population with and without dementia is required.
PubMed ID
33383356 View in PubMed
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Depressive symptoms among the medically hospitalized older individuals -- a 1-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125210
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;28(2):199-207
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Anne-Sofie Helvik
Knut Engedal
Geir Selbaek
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. Anne-Sofie.Helvik@ntnu.no
Source
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;28(2):199-207
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present follow-up study of older medically hospitalized patients from a rural area in Norway assessed the prevalence of depressive symptoms at 1-year follow-up and furthermore explored whether depressive symptoms at follow-up was associated with change in the medical, functional or emotional situation between baseline and follow-up.
A 1-year follow-up study included 363 (175 men) older medical inpatients with age range 65-98 (mean?=?80.2; standard deviation (SD)?=?7.5) years. Information was collected at baseline and follow-up using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD), the Mini-Mental State Examination, Lawton and Brody's scales for physical self-maintenance and performance of the instrumental activities of daily living.
The prevalence of depressive symptoms, as defined by a score?=?8 at HAD-D, was 10% at baseline and 7% at follow-up. Of those with depressive symptoms at baseline, 78% had experienced remission. The incidence of depressive symptoms at follow-up was 5%. In logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, gender, and depressive symptoms at baseline, becoming or being in need of assistance from nursing or social services (odds ratio (OR)?=?8.1, 95% CI: 1.9-34.2 and OR?=?4.4, 95% CI: 1.1-17.4, respectively), having a cognitive decline (OR?=?1.1, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3), and exhibiting poorer physical self-maintenance (OR?=?1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3), becoming vision impaired (OR?=?8.3, 95% CI: 2.8-25.0), and with increased anxiety (OR?=?1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.3) during follow-up was associated with depressive symptoms at follow-up.
The 1-year follow-up study of older medical inpatients contributes to the research body regarding risk factors of depression in older people.
PubMed ID
22505371 View in PubMed
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