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20 records – page 1 of 2.

The accessibility of a new oral motor pacifier to infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120045
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marja-Leena Haapanen
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Phoniatrics, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki University, Faculty of Medicine, PO Box 220, FI-00029 Helsinki, Finland. marja-leena.haapanen@hus.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Dec;76(12):1844-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation - methods
Child, Preschool
Equipment Design
Equipment Safety
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Pacifiers
Questionnaires
Sampling Studies
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine whether infants would accept an oral motor pacifier (OMP).
Sixteen infants were examined for their immediate acceptance of an OMP. The pacifier was regarded as accepted, if the child took it in the mouth and kept it there actively, i.e. sucked it in one way or other. Their parents were informed verbally and in writing literally about how to offer the OMP to the child and how to use it. The OMP was presented to the child and the child permitted to insert it into her/his mouth by her/himself or if the child failed to do so, the OMP was gently put to the child's mouth. The subjects' reactions were structurally evaluated in terms of 11 statements. The parents of the children received a structured questionnaire with a space for optional free comments and personal opinions.
The median age (6 females, 10 males) was 18 months (mean 19.2 months, s.d. 10.6 and range 2-38 months). The statement scores showed no significant differentiation based on the age of the subject. The parents' reports indicated that 14 (87.5%) of the 18 subjects accepted the OMP, 13 (81.3%) enjoyed watching the pacifier as it was shown to them, and 11 (68.8%) explored it with their fingers while holding it in their hands.
The vast majority of the children accepted the new OMP either at the first trial or after a few trials.
PubMed ID
23044359 View in PubMed
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Acute sinusitis: Finnish clinical practice guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174963
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2005;37(4):245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Karin Blomgren
Olli-Pekka Alho
Liisa Ertama
Pentti Huovinen
Matti Korppi
Marjukka Mäkelä
Matti Penttilä
Anne Pitkäranta
Seppo Savolainen
Helena Varonen
Jouko Suonpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. karin.blomgren@fimnet.fi
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2005;37(4):245-50
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Finland
Humans
Sinusitis - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Abstract
These clinical practice guidelines aim at providing assistance mainly to primary health care physicians for the diagnosis and management of acute sinusitis. Despite the huge impact of upper respiratory infections, criteria for diagnoses are often vague, and physicians are often uncertain of their diagnoses. This is not surprising, as the sole definition of acute sinusitis is somewhat confusing, not to mention the existing discrepancies between treatments, even among specialists. The Finnish Society of Otorhinolaryngology has set up a committee to evaluate existing data on acute sinusitis and to formulate these guidelines. The committee comprised Finnish experts in adult and paediatric otorhinolaryngology, clinical microbiology, radiology, paediatrics, and epidemiology. Recommendations given are based on the principles of evidence-based medicine, with the level of evidence presented.
PubMed ID
15871161 View in PubMed
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All snoring is not adenoids in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157819
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jun;72(6):879-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Katja Liukkonen
Paula Virkkula
Eeva T Aronen
Turkka Kirjavainen
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Finland. katja.liukkonen@hus.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Jun;72(6):879-84
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Parents
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Snoring - epidemiology
Tonsillectomy - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine the prevalence of snoring in young children and to assess age, growth, previous surgery therapy, respiratory problems and sleep-related symptoms in relation to child's snoring, and to evaluate the relationship between child's snoring and parents' snoring and smoking.
A cross-sectional study evaluated 2100 children 1-6 years of age in Helsinki, Finland. Child's frequency of snoring on a five-point scale (never to every night) and age, height, weight and body mass index, previous adenotonsillectomies, tympanostomies, allergic rhinitis and respiratory infections were determined as was frequency of parental snoring and smoking. Sleep problems were determined based on Finnish or Swedish modified version of the sleep disturbance scale for Children.
Of the 2100 eligible children, 1471 (71%) returned questionnaires. Children always or often snoring numbered 92 (6.3%), sometimes snoring, 183 (12.4%), and never or occasionally snoring, 1196 (81.3%). No difference in age (p=0.06) or gender (p=0.39) existed between snorers and non-snorers. History of previous adenotonsillectomies (p
PubMed ID
18400311 View in PubMed
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The clinical picture of juvenile parotitis in a prospective setup.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121272
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):177-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Riitta Saarinen
Kaija-Leena Kolho
Irja Davidkin
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland. riitta.t.saarinen@hus.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):177-81
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Amylases - blood
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Male
Mumps virus - immunology
Parotitis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Abstract
To characterize the features of juvenile parotitis in a prospective setup and epidemiology.
All children with parotitis admitted to Helsinki University Central Hospital 2005-2010 were recruited. Clinical characteristics, given treatment, outcome, blood leukocyte count, C-reactive protein, serum amylase and trypsinogen, SPINK-1 genotype and mumps antibodies were recorded. To map the epidemiology, a questionnaire was sent to 1000 randomly selected 13-year-old children.
The prospective study included 41 children (aged = 17) with acute parotitis, all in good general condition. Serum amylase, but not trypsinogen, was elevated in majority of the cases (79%) and C-reactive protein in 68%. Eleven (27%) children had an elevated blood leukocyte count. None had acute mumps. Most children recovered well, 51% being treated symptomatically only. Seven children were treated on ward. Seventeen (46%) children had recurrent symptoms. One child (2.4%) had SPINK P55S mutation. According to the epidemiological questionnaire, 1.1% of the respondents (8/728, response rate 73%) reported a verified episode(s) of parotitis.
Juvenile parotitis has a frequency close to 1%. In the majority, the general condition is good during the episode. Serum amylase serves as an additional marker for the disease. Parotitis has a tendency to recur in almost half of the cases.
PubMed ID
22924783 View in PubMed
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Complications of sclerotherapy for 75 head and neck venous malformations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277557
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Apr;273(4):1027-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Eeva Castrén
Johanna Aronniemi
Tuomas Klockars
Johanna Pekkola
Kimmo Lappalainen
Pia Vuola
Päivi Salminen
Anne Pitkäranta
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Apr;273(4):1027-36
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Head - blood supply
Humans
Male
Neck - blood supply
Polyethylene Glycols - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Sclerosing Solutions - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Sclerotherapy - methods
Sodium Tetradecyl Sulfate - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Malformations - diagnosis - therapy
Veins - abnormalities - drug effects
Abstract
Sclerotherapy is one treatment option for head and neck venous malformations (VMs). Evaluation of complication risks is, however, essential to improve its safety. We aimed to systematically report sclerotherapy complications by means of the Clavien-Dindo classification and to distinguish factors predisposing to complications. We identified our institution's head and neck VM patients who received sclerotherapy between 1 January 2007 and 31 August 2013, analyzed patient reports retrospectively, and applied to them the Clavien-Dindo classification. Our 75 VM patients underwent a total of 150 sclerotherapy sessions. The most common sclerosants were 3 % sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidocanol. Complications occurred in 13 patients (17.3 %) and in 15 sessions (10.0 %); 3 complications required extensive postprocedural treatment and caused permanent morbidity, whereas 12 received conservative treatment. Patients with sclerotherapy complications underwent more treatments (p = 0.009) and more often needed further surgery (p = 0.007). We thus consider sclerotherapy a relatively safe treatment modality for head and neck VMs. To avoid complications, evaluation of VM characteristics and optimal treatment technique in a multidisciplinary team is vital.
PubMed ID
25731642 View in PubMed
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Effect of accurate diagnostic criteria on incidence of acute otitis media in otitis-prone children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181269
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(1):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Karin Blomgren
Sara Pohjavuori
Tuija Poussa
Katja Hatakka
Riitta Korpela
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Helsinki, Finland. karin.blomgren@fimnet.fi
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2004;36(1):6-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - diagnosis - epidemiology
Otolaryngology - instrumentation - methods
Probability
Recurrence
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Over 70% of children currently suffer from acute otitis media (AOM) before their second birthday, and incidence is increasing rapidly. Recent studies have raised concern about inadequate use of diagnostic equipment and insufficient training in diagnoses. We recruited 309 children with a history of recurrent otitis media who were followed for 6 months during 1 infectious season. A study physician examined and treated any child whose parents suspected AOM. Pneumatic otoscope and tympanometry were used. Number of AOM diagnoses during the study was compared with AOM diagnoses during the preceding 6-month period. AOM diagnoses decreased 56%, and nearly 80% of children had fewer episodes of AOM discovered than during the preceding 6 months. AOM is frequently over-diagnosed. Use of proper diagnostic criteria, the pneumatic otoscope, and tympanometry can help correct diagnosis, and thereby reduce incidence of AOM.
PubMed ID
15000551 View in PubMed
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Finnish adenoidectomy and tympanostomy rates in children; national variation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168671
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Sep;70(9):1569-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Johanna Haapkylä
Gunnhild Karevold
Kari Jorunn Kvaerner
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, PL 220 00290 Helsinki, Finland. Johanna.haapkyla@helsinki.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2006 Sep;70(9):1569-73
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Middle Ear Ventilation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess upper respiratory surgery rates in Finnish children and compare the rates of adenoidectomy and tympanostomy tubes in 2002 with the 1987 cohort.
Descriptive study of national upper respiratory surgery in Finland in 1987 and 2002; adenoidectomies, tympanostomy tubes and combination of these two. Surgical rates were viewed in the light of child density and number of primary care physicians and otorhinolaryngologists.
Rates of adenoidectomy and tympanostomy tubes were highest in Western Finland and lowest in Eastern Finland (p
PubMed ID
16797731 View in PubMed
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Human bocavirus in the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129322
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Feb;76(2):206-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Liisa Lehtoranta
Maria Söderlund-Venermo
Johanna Nokso-Koivisto
Hanna Toivola
Karin Blomgren
Katja Hatakka
Tuija Poussa
Riitta Korpela
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Pharmacology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 63, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Feb;76(2):206-11
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
DNA, Viral - analysis - drug effects
Disease Susceptibility - epidemiology - virology
Double-Blind Method
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Human bocavirus - drug effects - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Intervention Studies
Logistic Models
Male
Nasopharynx - virology
Odds Ratio
Otitis Media - prevention & control - virology
Parvoviridae Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Probiotics - administration & dosage
Reference Values
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - prevention & control - virology
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Human bocavirus (HBoV) is frequently identified in children with respiratory tract infections, and its role in acute otitis media (AOM) has been suggested. The disease associations for the closely related bocaviruses HBoV2-4 remain unknown. Increasing evidence shows that probiotics may reduce the risk of AOM of viral origin. Objectives of the study was to examine the prevalence and persistence of bocaviruses in consecutive nasopharyngeal samples (NPS) of otitis-prone children, and whether an association exists between HBoV and the child's characteristics, respiratory symptoms, and AOM pathogens, and whether probiotics reduce the occurrence of HBoV.
In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, 6-month intervention study, 269 otitis-prone children (aged 9 months to 5.6 years), consumed daily either one capsule of probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, L. rhamnosus Lc705, Bifidobacterium breve 99 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii JS) or placebo. After a clinical examination and NPS collected at three-time points, the presence and persistence of HBoV1-4 DNA in NPS was determined by RT-qPCR at the baseline, after 3, and 6 months.
A high load (>10,000 copies/ml) of HBoV DNA was detected in 26 (17.1%) of 152 children, and 16 (10.5%) showed a prolonged presence of HBoV for at least 3 months. None had DNA of HBoV2-4. Higher number of siblings associated with increased HBoV prevalence (p=0.029). Prevalence or persistence of HBoV was not significantly associated with other characteristics, respiratory symptoms, or AOM pathogens. Probiotic intervention significantly reduced the number of HBoV DNA-positive samples (probiotic vs. placebo: 6.4% vs. 19.0%, OR=0.25, CI 95%=0.07-0.94, p=0.039).
HBoV, but not HBoV2-4, DNA occurs often in the nasopharynx of otitis-prone children, and may persist for 3-6 months. Probiotic treatment possibly reduced the presence of HBoV.
PubMed ID
22119148 View in PubMed
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Human picornavirus and coronavirus RNA in nasopharynx of children without concurrent respiratory symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191919
Source
J Med Virol. 2002 Mar;66(3):417-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Johanna Nokso-Koivisto
Teemu J Kinnari
Päivi Lindahl
Tapani Hovi
Anne Pitkäranta
Author Affiliation
Enterovirus Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. johanna.nokso-koivisto@hus.fi
Source
J Med Virol. 2002 Mar;66(3):417-20
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronavirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Enterovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Nasopharynx - virology
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology - virology
RNA, Viral - analysis
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - physiopathology - virology
Rhinovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
The prevalence of human rhino-, entero-, and coronaviruses was investigated by RT-PCR in nasopharyngeal aspirates from 107 children without concurrent respiratory symptoms. The children were admitted to the hospital for elective surgery. The parents filled a questionnaire about the occurrence of respiratory symptoms four weeks before and two weeks after the surgery. The rate of viral detection was 45% in children with related past or recent respiratory infection whereas 20% of the samples taken from children without any related past or recent respiratory infections were positive for picornavirus RNA, P = 0.008. Thirty-one (29%) of the nasopharyngeal aspirates were positive for viral RNA, 18% for rhinovirus, and 11% for enterovirus RNA. Coronavirus RNA was not found in any of the children. Fifty-five percent of the children with virus-positive samples had an infection-related diagnosis. In addition, 81% of the children with virus-positive samples had had previously respiratory symptoms or there were concurrent respiratory symptoms in other family members. Only four of the 31 virus-positive samples were from children without infection-related diagnosis or recent past (or immediate future) respiratory symptoms.
PubMed ID
11793396 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.