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Clinical education in private practice: an interdisciplinary project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180876
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Lorna Doubt
Margo Paterson
Anne O'Riordan
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. lornadoubt@sympatico.ca
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):47-50
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Occupational Therapy - education
Ontario
Physical Therapy Specialty - education
Preceptorship - methods
Private Practice
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Speech Therapy - education
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
Education of rehabilitation professionals traditionally has occurred in acute care hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and other publicly funded institutions, but increasing numbers of rehabilitation professionals are now working in the community in private agencies and clinics. These privately owned clinics and community agencies represent underutilized resources for the clinical training of students. Historically, private practitioners have been less likely to participate in clinical education because of concerns over patient satisfaction and quality of care, workload, costs, and liability. Through a program funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario, we conducted a series of interviews and focus groups with private practitioners, which identified that several incentives could potentially increase the numbers of clinical placements in private practices, including participation in the development of student learning objectives related to private practice, professional recognition, and improved relationships with the university departments. Placement in private practices can afford students skills in administration, business management, marketing and promotion, resource development, research, consulting, networking, and medical-legal assessments and processes. This paper presents a discussion of clinical education issues from the perspective of private practitioners, based on the findings of a clinical education project undertaken at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and previous literature.
PubMed ID
15053220 View in PubMed
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Developing empathy as a foundation of client-centred practice: evaluation of a university curriculum initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169383
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Margaret Jamieson
Terry Krupa
Anne O'Riordan
Donna O'Connor
Margo Paterson
Caroline Ball
Susan Wilcox
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. jamiesnm@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):76-85
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Disabled Persons - psychology
Empathy
Humans
Occupational Therapy - education
Patient-Centered Care
Pilot Projects
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
The foundation of client-centred practice is the therapist's capacity to view the world through the client's eyes and to develop an understanding of the lived experience of disability.
This paper describes the evaluation of an educational initiative promoting student empathy to the lived experience of disability.
Pairs of first-year occupational therapy students visited adults with disabilities who shared their knowledge and experience of living with a disability. Students reflected on their visits in journals, which were later analyzed using pattern matching.
Students appeared to appreciate the co-existence of health and disorder and demonstrated a holistic understanding of living with a disability. Little attention was focused on cultural and institutional environments. Students struggled to define the nature of their relationship with their tutors. Practice Implications. The evaluation confirmed our belief that this educational initiative could facilitate student empathy, consistent with critical features of client-centred practice.
PubMed ID
16680911 View in PubMed
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Development and pilot testing of the collaborative practice assessment tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138388
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 May;25(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Corinne Schroder
Jennifer Medves
Margo Paterson
Vaughan Byrnes
Christine Chapman
Anne O'Riordan
Deborah Pichora
Carly Kelly
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 May;25(3):189-95
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Patient care team
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Collaborative practice is receiving increased attention as a model of healthcare delivery that positively influences the effectiveness and efficiency of patient care while improving the work environment of healthcare providers. The collaborative practice assessment tool (CPAT) was developed from the literature to enable interprofessional teams to assess their collaborative practice. The CPAT survey included 56 items across nine domains including: mission and goals; relationships; leadership; role responsibilities and autonomy; communication; decision-making and conflict management; community linkages and coordination; perceived effectiveness and patient involvement; in addition to three open-ended questions. The tool was developed for use in a variety of settings involving a diversity of healthcare providers with the aim of helping teams to identify professional development needs and corresponding educational interventions. The results of two pilot tests indicated that the CPAT is a valid and reliable tool for assessing levels of collaborative practice within teams. This article describes the development of the tool, the pilot testing and validation process, as well as limitations of the tool.
PubMed ID
21182434 View in PubMed
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A new inter-professional course preparing learners for life in rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158604
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):836
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer Medves
Margo Paterson
Christine Y Chapman
John H Young
Elizabeth Tata
Denise Bowes
Neil Hobbs
Brian McAndrews
Anne O'Riordan
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):836
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Professional - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The 'Professionals in Rural Practice' course was developed with the aim of preparing students enrolled in professional programs in Canada to become better equipped for the possible eventuality of professional work in a rural setting. To match the reality of living and working in a rural community, which by nature is interprofessional, the course designers were an interprofessional teaching team. In order to promote group cohesiveness the course included the participation of an interprofessional group of students and instructors from the disciplines of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, teacher education, and theology. The format of the course included three-hour classes over an eight-week period and a two-day field experience in a rural community. The course utilized various experiential and interactive teaching and learning methods, along with a variety of assessment methods. Data were collected from student participants over two iterations of the course using a mixed methods approach. Results demonstrate that students value the interprofessional and experiential approach to learning and viewed this course as indispensable for gaining knowledge of other professions and preparation for rural practice. The data reveal important organizational and pedagogical considerations specific to interprofessional education, community based action research, and the unique interprofessional nature of training for life and work in a rural community. This study also indicates the potential value of further longitudinal study of participants in this course. Key words: Canada, community based action research, education, interdisciplinary, interprofessional.
PubMed ID
18302494 View in PubMed
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