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The effect of person-centred dementia care to prevent agitation and other neuropsychiatric symptoms and enhance quality of life in nursing home patients: a 10-month randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107351
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(5-6):340-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Janne Røsvik
Øyvind Kirkevold
Geir Selbaek
Jurate Saltyte Benth
Knut Engedal
Author Affiliation
Ageing and Health, Norwegian Centre for Research, Education and Service Development, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(5-6):340-53
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - complications - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Patient-Centered Care - methods - organization & administration
Psychomotor Agitation - etiology - prevention & control
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We examined whether Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) or the VIPS practice model (VPM) is more effective than education of the nursing home staff about dementia (control group) in reducing agitation and other neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as in enhancing the quality of life among nursing home patients.
A 10-month three-armed cluster-randomized controlled trial compared DCM and VPM with control. Of 624 nursing home patients with dementia, 446 completed follow-up assessments. The primary outcome was the change on the Brief Agitation Rating Scale (BARS). Secondary outcomes were changes on the 10-item version of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q), the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD) and the Quality of Life in Late-Stage Dementia (QUALID) scale.
Changes in the BARS score did not differ significantly between the DCM and the control group or between the VPM and the control group after 10 months. Positive differences were found for changes in the secondary outcomes: the NPI-Q sum score as well as the subscales NPI-Q agitation and NPI-Q psychosis were in favour of both interventions versus control, the QUALID score was in favour of DCM versus control and the CSDD score was in favour of VPM versus control.
This study failed to find a significant effect of both interventions on the primary outcome. Positive effects on the secondary outcomes indicate that the methods merit further investigation.
PubMed ID
24022375 View in PubMed
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Effects on Symptoms of Agitation and Depression in Persons With Dementia Participating in Robot-Assisted Activity: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274702
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 1;16(10):867-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2015
Author
Nina Jøranson
Ingeborg Pedersen
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Camilla Ihlebæk
Source
J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2015 Oct 1;16(10):867-73
Date
Oct-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Artificial Intelligence
Dementia - therapy
Depression - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mild Cognitive Impairment - therapy
Norway
Nursing Homes
Psychomotor Agitation
Robotics - instrumentation
Abstract
To examine effects on symptoms of agitation and depression in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia participating in a robot-assisted group activity with the robot seal Paro.
A cluster-randomized controlled trial. Ten nursing home units were randomized to either robot-assisted intervention or a control group with treatment as usual during 3 intervention periods from 2013 to 2014.
Ten adapted units in nursing homes in 3 counties in eastern Norway.
Sixty residents (67% women, age range 62-95 years) in adapted nursing home units with a dementia diagnosis or cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental State Examination score lower than 25/30).
Group sessions with Paro took place in a separate room at nursing homes for 30 minutes twice a week over the course of 12 weeks. Local nurses were trained to conduct the intervention.
Participants were scored on baseline measures (T0) assessing cognitive status, regular medication, agitation (BARS), and depression (CSDD). The data collection was repeated at end of intervention (T1) and at follow-up (3 months after end of intervention) (T2). Mixed models were used to test treatment and time effects.
Statistically significant differences in changes were found on agitation and depression between groups from T0 to T2. Although the symptoms of the intervention group declined, the control group's symptoms developed in the opposite direction. Agitation showed an effect estimate of -5.51, CI 0.06-10.97, P = .048, and depression -3.88, CI 0.43-7.33, P = .028. There were no significant differences in changes on either agitation or depression between groups from T0 to T1.
This study found a long-term effect on depression and agitation by using Paro in activity groups for elderly with dementia in nursing homes. Paro might be a suitable nonpharmacological treatment for neuropsychiatric symptoms and should be considered as a useful tool in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
26096582 View in PubMed
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The impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on competence in person-centred dementia care and job satisfaction of care staff.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291344
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2017 Jun; 12(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Betty Sandvik Døble
Knut Engedal
Øyvind Kirkevold
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Geir Selbaek
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health, Vestfold Health Trust, Tønsberg, Norway.
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2017 Jun; 12(2):
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Dementia - nursing
Female
Humans
Inservice training
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workload
Abstract
The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on the participants' competence in person-centred care and on their level of job satisfaction.
The development of person-centred care for people with dementia is highly recommended, and staff training that enhances such an approach may positively influence job satisfaction and the possibility of recruiting and retaining competent care staff.
The study is a longitudinal survey, following participants over a period of 24 months with a 6-month follow-up after completion of the programme.
A total of 1,795 participants from 90 municipalities in Norway are included, and 580 from 52 municipalities completed all measurements. The person-centred care assessment tool (P-CAT) is used to evaluate person-centredness. The psychosocial workplace environment and job satisfaction questionnaire is used to investigate job satisfaction. Measurements are made at baseline, and after 12, 24 and 30 months.
A statistically significant increase in the mean P-CAT subscore of person-centred practice and the P-CAT total score is found at 12, 24 and 30 months compared to baseline. A statistically significant decrease in scores in the P-CAT subscore for organisational support is found at all points of measurement compared to baseline. Statistically significant increases in satisfaction with workload, personal and professional development, demands balanced with qualifications and variation in job tasks as elements of job satisfaction are reported.
The evaluation of the Dementia ABC educational programme identifies statistically significant increases in scores of person-centredness and job satisfaction, indicating that the training has a positive impact.
The results indicate that a multicomponent training programme including written material, multidisciplinary reflection groups and workshops has a positive impact on the development of person-centred care practice and the job satisfaction of care staff.
PubMed ID
27868356 View in PubMed
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Targeted Interdisciplinary Model for Evaluation and Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293513
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Jan; 26(1):25-38
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Bjørn Lichtwarck
Geir Selbaek
Øyvind Kirkevold
Anne Marie Mork Rokstad
Jurate Šaltyte Benth
Jonas Christoffer Lindstrøm
Sverre Bergh
Author Affiliation
Centre for Old Age Psychiatric Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Ottestad, Norway; Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: bjornlic@online.no.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2018 Jan; 26(1):25-38
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aggression - physiology
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Dementia - complications - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Male
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Nursing Homes
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Psychomotor Agitation - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
To determine the effectiveness of the Targeted Interdisciplinary Model for Evaluation and Treatment of Neuropsychiatric Symptoms (TIME) for treatment of moderate to severe agitation in people with dementia.
In a single-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial in 33 nursing homes (clusters) from 20 municipalities in Norway, 229 patients (104 patients in 17 nursing homes and 125 patients in 16 nursing homes) were randomized to an intervention or control group, respectively. The intervention group received TIME, and the control group received a brief education-only intervention. TIME is an interdisciplinary multicomponent intervention and consists of a comprehensive assessment of the patient with the goal to create and put into action a tailored treatment plan. The primary outcome was the between-group difference in change at the agitation/aggression item of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Nursing Home version between baseline and 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes were the between-group difference in change at the agitation/aggression between baseline and 12 weeks in other neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life, and use of psychotropic and analgesic medications between baseline and 8 and 12 weeks.
A significant between-group difference in reduction of agitation at both 8 weeks (1.1; 95% confidence interval: 0.1-2.1; p?=?0.03) and 12 weeks (1.6; 95% confidence interval: 0.6-2.7; p?=?0.002) in favor of the TIME intervention was found.
The implementation of TIME resulted in a significant reduction of agitation among nursing homes patients with dementia. These results should inform training programs for care staff in Norway and internationally.
PubMed ID
28669575 View in PubMed
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