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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to the New Nordic Diet during pregnancy and subsequent maternal weight development: a study conducted in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299175
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Elling Bere
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
1Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition,University of Agder,PO Box 422,4604 Kristiansand,Norway.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1286-1294
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Child
Diet
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers
Norway - epidemiology
Overweight
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Risk factors
Weight Gain
Abstract
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a worldwide public health challenge. Pregnancy and beyond is a potentially important window for future weight gain in women. We investigated associations between maternal adherence to the New Nordic diet (NND) during pregnancy and maternal BMI trajectories from delivery to 8 years post delivery. Data are from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort. Pregnant women from all of Norway were recruited between 1999 and 2008, and 55 056 are included in the present analysis. A previously constructed diet score, NND, was used to assess adherence to the diet. The score favours intake of Nordic fruits, root vegetables, cabbages, potatoes, oatmeal porridge, whole grains, wild fish, game, berries, milk and water. Linear spline multi-level models were used to estimate the association. We found that women with higher adherence to the NND pattern during pregnancy had on average lower post-partum BMI trajectories and slightly less weight gain up to 8 years post delivery compared with the lower NND adherers. These associations remained after adjustment for physical activity, education, maternal age, smoking and parity (mean diff at delivery (high v. low adherers): -0·3 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·4, -0·2; mean diff at 8 years: -0·5 kg/m2; 95 % CI -0·6, -0·4), and were not explained by differences in energy intake or by exclusive breast-feeding duration. Similar patterns of associations were seen with trajectories of overweight/obesity as the outcome. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the NND may have beneficial properties to long-term weight regulation among women post-partum.
PubMed ID
29770760 View in PubMed
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Association between intake of artificially sweetened and sugar-sweetened beverages and preterm delivery: a large prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122026
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Linda Englund-Ögge
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margareta Haugen
Verena Sengpiel
Ali Khatibi
Ronny Myhre
Solveig Myking
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Marian Kacerovsky
Roy M Nilsen
Bo Jacobsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. linda.englund-ogge@vgregion.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):552-9
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor, Premature - etiology
Overweight - complications
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Single Person
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweetening Agents - adverse effects
Thinness - complications
Abstract
Artificially sweetened (AS) and sugar-sweetened (SS) beverages are commonly consumed during pregnancy. A recent Danish study reported that the daily intake of an AS beverage was associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
We examined the intake of AS and SS beverages in pregnant women to replicate the Danish study and observe whether AS intake is indeed associated with preterm delivery.
This was a prospective study of 60,761 pregnant women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Intakes of carbonated and noncarbonated AS and SS beverages and use of artificial sweeteners in hot drinks were assessed by a self-reported food-frequency questionnaire in midpregnancy. Preterm delivery was the primary outcome, and data were obtained from the Norwegian Medical Birth Registry.
Intakes of both AS and SS beverages increased with increasing BMI and energy intake and were higher in women with less education, in daily smokers, and in single women. A high intake of AS beverages was associated with preterm delivery; the adjusted OR for those drinking >1 serving/d was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.24). Drinking >1 serving of SS beverages per day was also associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery (adjusted OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.45). The trend tests were positive for both beverage types.
This study suggests that a high intake of both AS and SS beverages is associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854404 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between maternal iron supplementation during pregnancy and risk of celiac disease in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258027
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Apr;12(4):624-31.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Ketil Størdal
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Knut E A Lundin
Lars C Stene
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Østfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway. Electronic address: ketil.stordal@fhi.no.
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Apr;12(4):624-31.e1-2
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia - prevention & control
Celiac Disease - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects - methods
Female
Humans
Iron - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Abstract
The aim of our study was to determine whether the use of iron supplements during pregnancy affects the risk for celiac disease in children.
We assessed data from the prospective Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study, in which individuals with celiac disease were identified by answers on questionnaires and linkage to the Norwegian Patient Register. Complete data were available for 78,846 children (mean age 5.9 years, range 2-12 years); 314 children were identified with celiac disease. Questionnaires were given to pregnant women to collect information on use of iron-containing supplements, diet, anemia, and levels of hemoglobin.
Celiac disease was diagnosed in 4.65 of 1000 children whose mothers took iron supplements while they were pregnant, compared with 3.15 of 1000 children whose mothers did not. After adjusting for children's age, sex, and age of gluten introduction, and the presence of celiac disease in mothers, iron supplementation during pregnancy remained significantly associated with celiac disease in children (odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.68; P = .019). However, celiac disease was not associated with the mothers' intake of iron from foods (adjusted OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.97-1.03). Anemia before or during the early stages of pregnancy was not significantly associated with the risk of celiac disease in children (adjusted OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 0.84-2.00; P = .24). The use of iron supplements during pregnancy remained significantly associated with celiac disease in children after adjusting for children who were given iron supplements before 18 months of age, which itself was associated with celiac disease.
In a prospective Norwegian Mother and Child cohort study, we found an increased risk of celiac disease in children whose mothers used iron supplements during pregnancy; this association does not appear to arise from maternal anemia.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Apr;12(4):632-524211288
PubMed ID
24112997 View in PubMed
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Associations of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcome and postpartum weight retention: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260815
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Jan Alexander
Bente Oftedal
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Institute of Medicine (U.S.)
Live Birth - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - epidemiology
United States
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with pregnancy complications, and Norwegian Health Authorities have adopted the GWG recommendations of the US Institute of Medicine and National Research Council (IOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate if a GWG outside the IOM recommendation in a Norwegian population is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications like hypertension, low and high birth weight, preeclampsia, emergency caesarean delivery, and maternal post-partum weight retention (PPWR) at 6 and 18 months.
This study was performed in 56 101 pregnant women included in the prospective national Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) in the years 1999 to 2008. Women who delivered a singleton live born child during gestational week 37 to 42 were included. Maternal prepregnant and postpartum weight was collected from questionnaires at 17th week of gestation and 6 and 18 months postpartum.
A weight gain less than the IOM recommendations (GWG??IOM rec.) significantly increased the risk of pregnancy hypertension, a high birth weight baby, preeclampsia and emergency cesarean delivery in both nulliparous and parous normal weight women. Similar results were found for overweight women except for no increased risk for gestational hypertension in parous women with GWG?>?IOM rec. Seventy-four percent of the overweight nulliparous women and 66% of the obese women had a GWG?>?IOM rec. A GWG?>?IOM rec. resulted in increased risk of PPWR?>?2 kg in all weight classes, but most women attained their prepregnant weight class by 18 months post-partum.
For prepregnant normal weight and overweight women a GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk for unfavorable birth outcomes in both nulliparous and parous women. A GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk of a PPWR?>?2 kg at 18 months in all weight classes. This large study supports the Norwegian Health authorities' recommendations for normal weight and overweight women to comply with the IOM rec.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24917037 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding in relation to weight retention up to 36 months postpartum in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study: modification by socio-economic status?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259545
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jul;17(7):1514-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Martin Brandhagen
Lauren Lissner
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anna-Pia Häggkvist
Margaretha Haugen
Anna Winkvist
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Jul;17(7):1514-23
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Income
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Mothers
Norway
Obesity - prevention & control
Postpartum Period
Poverty
Pregnancy
Social Class
Weight Gain
Abstract
We investigated the association between full breast-feeding up to 6 months as well as partial breast-feeding after 6 months and maternal weight retention at 6, 18 and 36 months after delivery in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.
Cohort study. Information on exposure and outcome was collected by questionnaire.
Norway.
Women at 6 months (n 49 676), 18 months (n 27 187) and 36 months (n 17 343) postpartum.
Longer duration of full breast-feeding as well as partial breast-feeding was significantly related to lower weight retention at 6 months. At 18 months full breast-feeding (0-6 months) and partial breast-feeding for 12-18 months were significantly related to lower weight retention. At 36 months only full breast-feeding (0-6 months) was significantly related to lower weight retention. For each additional month of full breast-feeding, maternal weight was lowered by 0·50 kg/month at 6 months, 0·10 kg/month at 18 months and 0·14 kg/month at 36 months (adjusted for pre-pregnant BMI, pregnancy weight gain, age and parity). Partial breast-feeding resulted in 0·25 kg/month lower maternal weight at 6 months. Interactions were found between household income and full breast-feeding in relation to weight retention at 6, 18 and 36 months, indicating most benefit among women with low income.
The present study supports the hypothesis that full breast-feeding contributes to lower postpartum weight retention and shows that the effect is maintained for as long as 3 years postpartum.
PubMed ID
23915637 View in PubMed
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Caffeine exposure during pregnancy, small for gestational age birth and neonatal outcome - results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301107
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-26-2019
Author
Dominika Modzelewska
Rino Bellocco
Anders Elfvin
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Bo Jacobsson
Verena Sengpiel
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Academy, SE-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. dominika.modzelewska@gu.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Feb 26; 19(1):80
Date
Feb-26-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Weight - drug effects
Caffeine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - chemically induced
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Norway
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - chemically induced
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Maternal caffeine intake has repeatedly been linked to babies being born small for gestational age (SGA). SGA babies are known to be at increased risk for adverse neonatal outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between prenatal caffeine exposure and neonatal health.
The study is based on 67,569 full-term singleton mother-infant pairs from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Caffeine consumption from different sources was self-reported in gestational week 22. Neonatal compound outcomes, namely (1) morbidity/mortality and (2) neonatal intervention, were created based on the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Adjusted logistic regression was performed.
Caffeine exposure was associated to SGA (OR?=?1.16, 95%CI: 1.10; 1.23) and being born SGA was significantly associated with neonatal health (OR?=?3.09, 95%CI: 2.54; 3.78 for morbidity/mortality; OR?=?3.94, 95%CI: 3.50; 4.45 for intervention). However, prenatal caffeine exposure was neither associated with neonatal morbidity/mortality (OR?=?1.01, 95%CI: 0.96; 1.07) nor neonatal intervention (OR?=?1.02, 95%CI: 1.00; 1.05 for a 100?mg caffeine intake increase). Results did not change after additional adjustment for SGA status.
Moderate prenatal caffeine exposure (
PubMed ID
30808339 View in PubMed
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Changes and tracking of fruit, vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages intake from 18 months to 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265498
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mona Bjelland
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Wenche Nystad
Lene Frost Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Norway - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Public Health
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
A few studies have investigated tracking of dietary patterns or nutrient intake in pre-school children, but no studies have been identified examining tracking of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fruit and vegetable intakes in early childhood (1-7 year olds). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes and tracking of intakes of fruit, vegetables and SSB, and association between maternal education and dietary tracking, from 18 months to 7 years of age.
Longitudinal data from the nation-wide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health were used, including 9025 children participating at three time points (18 months, 36 months and 7 years). Frequencies of fruit, vegetables and SSB were assessed by questionnaire. Slightly different questions were used at each time point to collect information about intake. Maternal education was categorized into =?12 years, 13-16 years, =?17 years. Cross-tabulation, Spearman's rho and multinomial logistic regression were used for assessing change, tracking and differences by maternal education.
Analyses by gender indicated largest changes for intake of fruit and SSB from age 18 months to 7 years. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients (Spearman's rho = 0.23-0.46) for intake of fruit, vegetables and SSB were found and children assigned to low, medium and high frequency of consumption at 18 months continued to be in the same group at age 36 months and 7 years. Children of mothers with low education consumed fruit and vegetables less often and SSB more often compared to children of mothers with high education at 18 months of age. Children with higher educated mothers had lower odds for increasing fruit intake or decreasing SSB intake, compared to children with lower educated mothers showing a stable intake.
The tracking coefficients for intakes were fair to moderate and differences in intakes according to maternal education were found already at age 18 months. This suggests that promotion of healthy dietary behaviours at an early age is important to prevent unfavourable dietary behaviours later in childhood. Moreover, it seems important to target mothers in nutrition interventions for improving dietary habits among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24103398 View in PubMed
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Characteristics associated with organic food consumption during pregnancy; data from a large cohort of pregnant women in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99812
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010 Dec 21;10(1):775
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-21-2010
Author
Hanne Torjusen
Anne Lise Brantsaeter
Margaretha Haugen
Geir Lieblein
Hein Stigum
Gun Roos
Gerd Holmboe-Ottesen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010 Dec 21;10(1):775
Date
Dec-21-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the use of organic food during pregnancy. The aim of this study was to describe characteristics associated with the use of organic food among pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). METHODS: The present study includes 63,561 women who during the years 2002-2007 answered two questionnaires, a general health questionnaire at gestational week 15 and a food frequency questionnaire at weeks 17-22. We used linear binomial regression with frequent versus rare use of organic food as outcome variable and characteristics of the respondent as independent variables. The outcome variable was derived from self-reported frequency of organic food use in six main food groups (milk/dairy, bread/cereal, eggs, vegetables, fruit and meat). RESULTS: Organic eggs and vegetables were the food items which were most frequently reported to be used "often" or "mostly". The proportion of women reporting frequent intake of organic food was 9.1% (n=5754). This group included more women in the lower (40 years) age-groups, with normal or low body mass index, who were vegetarians, exercised regularly (3+times weekly), consumed alcohol and smoked cigarettes during pregnancy (p
PubMed ID
21172040 View in PubMed
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Children and adolescents need protection against energy drinks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297576
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 09 18; 138(14):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-18-2018
Author
Kaja Lund Iversen
Erik Arnesen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 09 18; 138(14):
Date
09-18-2018
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caffeine - adverse effects
Child
Energy Drinks - adverse effects
Humans
Marketing - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - chemically induced
Substance-Related Disorders - etiology
Notes
CommentIn: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 Oct 30;138(17): PMID 30378415
CommentIn: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2018 Oct 30;138(17): PMID 30378413
PubMed ID
30234262 View in PubMed
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