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Assessment of smoking behaviors in the home and their influence on children's passive smoking: development of a questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29652
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2005 Jul;15(6):453-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
AnnaKarin Johansson
Arne Halling
Göran Hermansson
Johnny Ludvigsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@IMV.liu.se
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2005 Jul;15(6):453-9
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
PURPOSE: To construct and validate a questionnaire aiming to measure children's exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the home. METHODS: The development of the instrument included epidemiological studies, qualitative interviews, pilot studies, and validation with biomarkers and is described in seven consecutive steps. Parents of preschool children, from different population-based samples in south-east Sweden, have participated in the studies. RESULTS: Content and face validity was tested by an expert panel and core elements for the purpose of the instrument identified. Reliability was shown with test-retest of the first version. The validation with biomarkers indicated that the sensitivity of the instrument was high enough to discriminate between children's ETS exposure levels. Cotinine/creatinine levels were related to parents' described smoking behaviors. Differences were shown between children from non-smoking homes, and all groups with smoking parents, independent of their smoking behavior (p
PubMed ID
15967393 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137958
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Carina Wennerholm
Björn Grip
Annakarin Johansson
Hans Nilsson
Marja-Liisa Honkasalo
Tomas Faresjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2011;10:5
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Social Environment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases estimate to be the leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The purpose of this study was to compare the occurrence of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in two close cities, the Twin cities.
We focused on the total population in two neighbour and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants each. These twin cities represent two different social environments in the same Swedish county. According to their social history they could be labelled a "blue-collar" and a "white-collar" city. Morbidity data for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care. The morbidity data presented are cumulative incidence rates and the data on mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish statistics.
The cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women revealed significantly differences for studied cardiovascular diagnoses. The occurrence rates were in all aspects highest in the population of the "blue-collar" twin city for both sexes.
This study revealed that there are significant differences in risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the populations in the studied different social environments. These differences seem to be profound and stable over time and thereby give implication for public health policy to initiate a community intervention program in the "blue-collar" twin city.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21226912 View in PubMed
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Experiences of community health nurses regarding father participation in child health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132331
Source
J Child Health Care. 2011 Sep;15(3):153-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Siw Alehagen
Monica Hägg
Maria Kalén-Enterlöv
AnnaKarin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
J Child Health Care. 2011 Sep;15(3):153-62
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Health Services
Community Health Nursing
Father-Child Relations
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Traditionally child health care (CHC) has been an arena where mothers and nurses meet, but in recent years fathers are entering CHC with increasing frequency. The aim of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of fathers' participation in CHC. Nine Swedish nurses working in CHC were interviewed and asked to give a description of their experiences from meetings with fathers in CHC. Phenomenology according to Giorgi was used for the analysis and the essence of the findings was that father participation was seen from the perspective of mother participation and was constantly compared to mother participation in CHC. The essence is explicated in the following themes: participation through activities; equal participation although diverse; influence of structures in society; and strengthening participation. Clinical implications include the need for creating a separate identity in CHC for fathers and more communication directed at fathers.
PubMed ID
21828167 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with nutritional risk in 75-year-old community living people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134025
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Ulrika Söderhamn
Lennart Christensson
Ewa Idvall
Annakarin Johansson
Margareta Bachrach-Lindström
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Nursing Sciences and Centre for Caring Research-Southern Norway, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, Arendal, Norway. ulrika.soderhamn@uia.no
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2012 Mar;7(1):3-10
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Elder Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Female
Housing for the Elderly - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Malnutrition - diagnosis - epidemiology
Nutrition Assessment
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To identify risk factors for being at nutritional risk, by means of a nutritional screening, in a population based sample of 75-year-old people living in three county councils in Sweden.
Undernutrition in older people is known to contribute to poor health. The instrument 'Nutritional Form For the Elderly' (NUFFE) helps to identify those at nutritional risk.
The screening instrument 'Nutritional Form For the Elderly', background variables and health related questions were mail distributed. A total of 1461 persons (75 years old) were included in the study. Descriptive statistical methods were used in the analyses.
One percent of the participants had high risk, 21.3% medium and 77.7% low risk for undernutrition. Medium or high risk was predicted by: living alone, receiving help and impaired perceived health. Low Body Mass Index was associated with low risk for undernutrition.
By using a simple nutritional screening instrument, significant risk factors were highlighted. Relevance to practice. This instrument can identify older people at nutritional risk and is easy to use. Older people living alone have an increased risk of undernutrition. Body Mass Index (BMI) should be used with caution as one and only indicator of nutritional risk in older people.
PubMed ID
21631877 View in PubMed
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How should parents protect their children from environmental tobacco-smoke exposure in the home?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30414
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Apr;113(4):e291-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
AnnaKarin Johansson
Gören Hermansson
Johnny Ludvigsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Paediatrics, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@IMV.liu.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Apr;113(4):e291-5
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - urine
Creatinine - urine
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Children's exposure to tobacco smoke is known to have adverse health effects, and most parents try to protect their children. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effectiveness of parents' precautions for limiting their children's tobacco-smoke exposure and to identify variables associated to parents' smoking behavior. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Children, 2.5 to 3 years old, participating in All Babies in Southeast Sweden, a prospective study on environmental factors affecting development of immune-mediated diseases. Smoking parents of 366 children answered a questionnaire on their smoking behavior. Cotinine analyses were made on urine specimen from these children and 433 age-matched controls from nonsmoking homes. RESULTS: Smoking behavior had a significant impact on cotinine levels. Exclusively outdoor smoking with the door closed gave lower urine cotinine levels of children than when mixing smoking near the kitchen fan and near an open door or indoors but higher levels than controls. Variables of importance for smoking behavior were not living in a nuclear family (odds ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.1-4.1) and high cigarette consumption (odds ratio: 1.6; 95% confidence interval: 1.2-2.1). An exposure score with controls as the reference group (1.0) gave an exposure score for outdoor smoking with the door closed of 2.0, for standing near an open door + outdoors of 2.4, for standing near the kitchen fan + outdoors of 3.2, for mixing near an open door, kitchen fan, and outdoors of 10.3, and for indoor smoking of 15.2. CONCLUSION: Smoking outdoors with the door closed was not a total but the most effective way to protect children from environmental tobacco-smoke exposure. Other modes of action had a minor effect.
PubMed ID
15060255 View in PubMed
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How to minimize children's environmental tobacco smoke exposure: an intervention in a clinical setting in high risk areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262277
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Noomi Carlsson
AnnaKarin Johansson
Agneta Abrahamsson
Boel Andersson Gäre
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2013;13:76
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cotinine - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - urine
Smoking Cessation - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Despite the low prevalence of daily smokers in Sweden, children are still being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), primarily by their smoking parents. A prospective intervention study using methods from Quality Improvement was performed in Child Health Care (CHC). The aim was to provide nurses with new methods for motivating and supporting parents in their efforts to protect children from ETS exposure.
Collaborative learning was used to implement and test an intervention bundle. Twenty-two CHC nurses recruited 86 families with small children which had at least one smoking parent. Using a bundle of interventions, nurses met and had dialogues with the parents over a one-year period. A detailed questionnaire on cigarette consumption and smoking policies in the home was answered by the parents at the beginning and at the end of the intervention, when children also took urine tests to determine cotinine levels.
Seventy-two families completed the study. Ten parents (11%) quit smoking. Thirty-two families (44%) decreased their cigarette consumption. Forty-five families (63%) were outdoor smokers at follow up. The proportion of children with urinary cotinine values of >6 ng/ml had decreased.
The intensified tobacco prevention in CHC improved smoking parents' ability to protect their children from ETS exposure.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23672646 View in PubMed
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Indoor and outdoor smoking: impact on children's health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31023
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2003 Mar;13(1):61-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Annakarin Johansson
Arne Halling
Göran Hermansson
Author Affiliation
Division of Paediatrics, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@imv.liu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2003 Mar;13(1):61-6
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Welfare
Male
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many children are exposed to ETS (environmental tobacco smoke), which has both immediate and long-term adverse health effects. The aim was to determine the prevalence and nature of smoking among parents with infants and the association of indoor or outdoor smoking with the health of their children. METHODS: Mail-questionnaire study, which was performed in a county in the south-east of Sweden, as a retrospective cross-sectional survey including 1990 children, 12-24 months old. RESULTS: 20% of the children had at least one smoking parent; 7% had parents who smoked indoors and 13% parents who smoked only outdoors. Indoor smoking was most prevalent among single and blue-collar working parents. In the case of smoking cessation during pregnancy, smoking was usually resumed after delivery or at the end of the breast-feeding period. Coughing more than two weeks after a URI (upper respiratory infection), wheezing without a URI as well as pooled respiratory symptoms differed significantly between children of non-smokers and indoor smokers. CONCLUSION: Further research of the common belief that outdoor smoking is sufficient to protect infants from health effects due to ETS exposure is warranted.
PubMed ID
12678316 View in PubMed
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Parents' attitudes to children's tobacco smoke exposure and how the issue is handled in health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30162
Source
J Pediatr Health Care. 2004 Sep-Oct;18(5):228-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
AnnaKarin Johansson
Göran Hermansson
Johnny Ludvigsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Paediatrics, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@IMV.liu.se
Source
J Pediatr Health Care. 2004 Sep-Oct;18(5):228-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Nursing - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - prevention & control
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Education - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Parents
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The objective of the study was to understand the opinions and attitudes among parents of preschool children towards children's passive smoking, to show how attitudes influenced smoking and smoking behavior, and how the parents had experienced the handling of the tobacco issue in antenatal and child health care. METHOD: A subsample of smoking and nonsmoking parents (n = 300) with 4- to 6-year-old children participating in All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS), a prospective study on environmental factors affecting development of immune-mediated diseases, answered a questionnaire on their opinions and attitudes to children's passive smoking. RESULTS: Indoor smokers were more positive regarding smoking, less aware of the adverse health effects from passive smoking, and more negative regarding the handling of tobacco prevention in health care than both outdoor smokers and nonsmokers. Indoor smokers' idea of how children should be protected from tobacco smoke exposure was significantly different from the idea of nonsmokers and outdoor smokers. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that further intense efforts are needed to convince the remaining indoor smokers about the adverse health effects related to tobacco smoke exposure. Pediatric nurses meet these parents in their daily work and should be aware of the need to focus this group and their use of protective measures.
PubMed ID
15337917 View in PubMed
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Parents' attitudes to smoking and passive smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in child health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100062
Source
J Child Health Care. 2010 Nov 15;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2010
Author
Noomi Carlsson
Annakarin Johansson
Göran Hermansson
Boel Andersson-Gäre
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University; Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Linköping.
Source
J Child Health Care. 2010 Nov 15;
Date
Nov-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe parents' attitudes to smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in antenatal care and in Child Health Care (CHC) in Sweden. A population based survey in which 62 percent of 3000 randomly selected parents with 1- and 3-year-old children answered a questionnaire. Fifty-six percent stated that smoking was registered in the health record of the child yet no further discussion regarding passive smoking took place. The parents' educational level and smoking status was related to the attitudes and experiences of the tobacco preventive work. The results indicated that the dialogue with parents regarding children and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure has to be redesigned and intensified in order to meet the needs of parents with different backgrounds.
PubMed ID
21078698 View in PubMed
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"Smoking in Children's Environment Test": a qualitative study of experiences of a new instrument applied in preventive work in child health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128730
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2011;11:113
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Noomi Carlsson
Siw Alehagen
Boel Andersson Gäre
Annakarin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. noomi.carlsson@lj.se
Source
BMC Pediatr. 2011;11:113
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - methods
Child Welfare
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incidence
Nurses - standards
Questionnaires
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Abstract
Despite knowledge of the adverse health effects of passive smoking, children are still being exposed. Children's nurses play an important role in tobacco preventive work through dialogue with parents aimed at identifying how children can be protected from environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure. The study describes the experiences of Child Health Care (CHC) nurses when using the validated instrument SiCET (Smoking in Children's Environment Test) in dialogue with parents.
In an intervention in CHC centres in south-eastern Sweden nurses were invited to use the SiCET. Eighteen nurses participated in focus group interviews. Transcripts were reviewed and their contents were coded into categories by three investigators using the method described for focus groups interviews.
The SiCET was used in dialogue with parents in tobacco preventive work and resulted in focused discussions on smoking and support for behavioural changes among parents. The instrument had both strengths and limitations. The nurses experienced that the SiCET facilitated dialogue with parents and gave a comprehensive view of the child's ETS exposure. This gave nurses the possibility of taking on a supportive role by offering parents long-term help in protecting their child from ETS exposure and in considering smoking cessation.
Our findings indicate that the SiCET supports nurses in their dialogue with parents on children's ETS exposure at CHC. There is a need for more clinical use and evaluation of the SiCET to determine its usefulness in clinical practice under varying circumstances.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22172056 View in PubMed
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