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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
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Associations of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with pregnancy outcome and postpartum weight retention: a prospective observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260815
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Margaretha Haugen
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Jan Alexander
Bente Oftedal
Per Magnus
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014;14:201
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Body mass index
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Emergencies
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Institute of Medicine (U.S.)
Live Birth - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Parity
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Thinness - epidemiology
United States
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with pregnancy complications, and Norwegian Health Authorities have adopted the GWG recommendations of the US Institute of Medicine and National Research Council (IOM). The aim of this study was to evaluate if a GWG outside the IOM recommendation in a Norwegian population is associated with increased risk of pregnancy complications like hypertension, low and high birth weight, preeclampsia, emergency caesarean delivery, and maternal post-partum weight retention (PPWR) at 6 and 18 months.
This study was performed in 56 101 pregnant women included in the prospective national Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) in the years 1999 to 2008. Women who delivered a singleton live born child during gestational week 37 to 42 were included. Maternal prepregnant and postpartum weight was collected from questionnaires at 17th week of gestation and 6 and 18 months postpartum.
A weight gain less than the IOM recommendations (GWG??IOM rec.) significantly increased the risk of pregnancy hypertension, a high birth weight baby, preeclampsia and emergency cesarean delivery in both nulliparous and parous normal weight women. Similar results were found for overweight women except for no increased risk for gestational hypertension in parous women with GWG?>?IOM rec. Seventy-four percent of the overweight nulliparous women and 66% of the obese women had a GWG?>?IOM rec. A GWG?>?IOM rec. resulted in increased risk of PPWR?>?2 kg in all weight classes, but most women attained their prepregnant weight class by 18 months post-partum.
For prepregnant normal weight and overweight women a GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk for unfavorable birth outcomes in both nulliparous and parous women. A GWG?>?IOM rec. increased the risk of a PPWR?>?2 kg at 18 months in all weight classes. This large study supports the Norwegian Health authorities' recommendations for normal weight and overweight women to comply with the IOM rec.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24917037 View in PubMed
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Maternal Prepregnant Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain Are Associated with Initiation and Duration of Breastfeeding among Norwegian Mothers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265382
Source
J Nutr. 2015 Jun;145(6):1263-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Anna Winkvist
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Martin Brandhagen
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Lauren Lissner
Source
J Nutr. 2015 Jun;145(6):1263-70
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Breast Feeding
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Obesity
Overweight
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Thinness
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is associated with weight gain. Moreover, overweight and obese women subsequently have difficulties with breastfeeding. Both of these factors may contribute to the observed relations between reproduction and weight problems.
In this study we evaluated the combined effects of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on the ability to initiate and sustain breastfeeding in a large, population-based study, the MoBa (Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study).
Initiation and maintenance of breastfeeding for 4 and 6 mo postpartum in relation to prepregnancy BMI and GWG were evaluated among 49,669 women with complete information on BMI, GWG, and breastfeeding by using multivariable logistic regression analyses.
An excess risk of unsuccessful initiation of breastfeeding was observed among all categories of prepregnant overweight and obese women as well as among most GWG categories of prepregnant underweight women. For all of these groups, risks of unsuccessful initiation of breastfeeding were significantly higher with GWG below recommendations. The same patterns were seen among all categories of prepregnant overweight and obese women with respect to risks of inability to sustain full or any breastfeeding for 4 and 6 mo postpartum. However, prepregnant obese women had the highest risk of inability to sustain full or any breastfeeding if they had also experienced GWG above recommendations. The associations between prepregnancy BMI and breastfeeding were modified by Apgar scores and maternal asthma.
The results show the importance of encouraging women to start pregnancy with a healthy BMI as well as to have GWG within recommendations for the benefit of successful breastfeeding. The interactions with medical conditions further highlight the complexity of the associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25904732 View in PubMed
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A randomized controlled cross-over trial investigating the effect of anti-inflammatory diet on disease activity and quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis: the Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis (ADIRA) study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300369
Source
Nutr J. 2018 04 20; 17(1):44
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-20-2018
Author
Anna Winkvist
Linnea Bärebring
Inger Gjertsson
Lars Ellegård
Helen M Lindqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 459, S-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. anna.winkvist@nutrition.gu.se.
Source
Nutr J. 2018 04 20; 17(1):44
Date
04-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - administration & dosage
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diet therapy
Cross-Over Studies
Diet
Fast Foods
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolomics
Middle Aged
Nutrients - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Patient Selection
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects 0.5-1.0% of the population, and where many patients in spite of modern pharmacological treatment fail to reach remission. This affects physical as well as mental wellbeing and leads to severely reduced quality of life and reduced work capacity, thus yielding high individual as well as societal costs. As a complement to modern pharmacological treatment, lifestyle intervention should be evaluated as a treatment option. Scientific evidence exists for anti-inflammatory effects by single foods on RA, but no study exists where these foods have been combined to obtain maximum effect and thus offer a substantial improvement in patient life quality. The main goal of the randomized cross-over trial ADIRA (Anti-inflammatory Diet In Rheumatoid Arthritis) is to test the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory diet intervention, compared to a regular diet, will decrease disease activity and improve quality of life in patients with stable established RA.
In total, 50 RA patients with moderate disease activity are randomized to receive initially either a portfolio diet based on several food items with suggested anti-inflammatory effects or a control diet during 2?×?10 weeks with 3 months wash-out between diets. Food bags are delivered weekly by a home food delivery chain and referred to as the fiber bag and the protein bag, respectively, to partially blind participants. Both groups continue with regular pharmacological treatment. Known food biomarkers will be analyzed to measure intervention compliance. Impact on disease severity (measured by DAS28, a composite score which predicts disability and progression of RA), risk markers for cardiovascular disease and quality of life are evaluated after each diet regimen. Metabolomics will be used to evaluate the potential to predict responders to dietary treatment. A health economic evaluation is also included.
The nutritional status of patients with RA often is poor and many ask their physician for diet advice. No evidence-based dietary guidelines for patients with RA exist because of the paucity of well-conducted sufficiently large diet intervention trials. ADIRA is an efficacy study and will provide evidence as to whether dietary treatment of RA can reduce disease activity and improve quality of life as well as reduce individual and societal costs.
ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02941055 .
PubMed ID
29678183 View in PubMed
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Surprisingly low compliance to local guidelines for risk factor based screening for gestational diabetes mellitus - A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98746
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2009;9:53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Margareta Persson
Anna Winkvist
Ingrid Mogren
Author Affiliation
Department of clinical science, Obstetrics and gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden. margareta.persson@obgyn.umu.se
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2009;9:53
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Screening for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is routine during pregnancy in many countries in the world. The screening programs are either based on general screening offered to all pregnant women or risk factor based screening stipulated in local clinical guidelines. The aims of this study were to investigate: 1) the compliance with local guidelines of screening for GDM and 2) the outcomes of pregnancy and birth in relation to risk factors of GDM and whether or not exposed to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). METHODS: This study design was a population-based retrospective cross-sectional study of 822 women. A combination of questionnaire data and data collected from medical records was applied. Compliance to the local guidelines of risk factor based screening for GDM was examined and a comparison of outcomes of pregnancy and delivery in relation to risk factor groups for GDM was performed. RESULTS: Of the 822 participants, 257 (31.3%) women fulfilled at least one criterion for being exposed to screening for GDM according to the local clinical guidelines. However, only 79 (30.7%) of these women were actually exposed to OGTT and of those correctly exposed for screening, seven women were diagnosed with GDM. Women developing risk factors for GDM during pregnancy had a substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. CONCLUSION: Surprisingly low compliance with the local clinical guidelines for screening for GDM during pregnancy was found. Furthermore, the prevalence of the risk factors of GDM in our study was almost doubled compared to previous Swedish studies. Pregnant women developing risk factors of GDM during pregnancy were found to be at substantially increased risk of giving birth to an infant with macrosomia. There is a need of actions improving compliance to the local guidelines.
PubMed ID
19917091 View in PubMed
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