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Acute alcohol consumption and motivation to reduce drinking among injured patients in a Swedish emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120290
Source
J Addict Nurs. 2012 Oct;23(3):152-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Anna Trinks
Karin Festin
Preben Bendtsen
Cheryl J Cherpitel
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Anna Trinks, MSc, Karin Festin, PhD, Preben Bendtsen, PhD, and Per Nilsen, PhD, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping, Sweden. Cheryl J. Cherpitel, DrPH, Alcohol Research Group, Berkeley, California.
Source
J Addict Nurs. 2012 Oct;23(3):152-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Binge Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Injuries constitute a major public health problem. Millions of people are injured each year, and acute drinking is a well-known risk factor for injuries. Research suggests that acknowledgment of alcohol as a factor in an injury enhances willingness to change drinking behavior, possibly because the patient becomes aware of the negative consequences of their drinking. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of acute alcohol consumption (drinking before the event) among injury patients and to examine the importance of factors potentially associated with motivation to reduce alcohol consumption among these patients. All patients aged 18-69 years were requested to answer alcohol-related questions on a touchscreen computer. Fifteen percent of injured patients were categorized as acute drinkers, and of these, 64% reported that their injury was connected to alcohol. There were significant differences for all sociodemographic and drinking characteristics between acute drinkers and nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were categorized as risky drinkers to a much higher extent than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had a considerably higher average weekly alcohol consumption and engaged far more frequently in heavy episodic drinking than nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers were motivated to reduce their alcohol intake to a greater extent than nonacute drinkers; 51% were in the action, preparation, and contemplation stages, compared with 19% of the nonacute drinkers. Acute drinkers had considerably more detrimental alcohol consumption than nonacute drinkers, and the acute drinkers were more motivated to reduce their drinking than the nonacute drinkers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24335731 View in PubMed
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Reach and effectiveness of a computer-based alcohol intervention in a Swedish emergency room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142918
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2010 Jul;18(3):138-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Anna Trinks
Karin Festin
Preben Bendtsen
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Science, Division of Community Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. anna.trinks@liu.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2010 Jul;18(3):138-46
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods
Emergency Service, Hospital
Emergency Treatment - methods
Feedback, Psychological
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study evaluates a computerized alcohol intervention implemented in a Swedish emergency department (ED) with regard to the effectiveness of two different types of tailored brief feedback on patients' drinking patterns and the reach of the intervention.
The study was a prospective, randomized controlled trial of ED patients. The designated target population was the ED population aged 18-69 years who registered at the triage room before receiving care. Patients who were categorized as risky drinkers and completed the computerized test were randomized to either a long or a short feedback. The feedback was tailored on the basis of the individual patient's responses to questions on their drinking patterns.
The computerized intervention reached 41% of the target population. Those who completed the computerized test and received the feedback were younger than those who did not receive the intervention. Among those who could be followed up, the feedback was effective in reducing the patient's weekly alcohol consumption and the number of heavy episodic drinking occasions. The long feedback was slightly more effective than the short feedback, but the differences were not statistically significant.
PubMed ID
20542239 View in PubMed
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Senior alert: a quality registry to support a standardized, structured, and systematic preventive care process for older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278721
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2015 Apr-Jun;24(2):96-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joakim Edvinsson
Magnus Rahm
Anna Trinks
Pär J Höglund
Source
Qual Manag Health Care. 2015 Apr-Jun;24(2):96-101
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Quality Control
Quality of Health Care
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The average life expectancy and the proportion of the elderly in the Western countries are increasing. The care processes used for the elderly are known to differ between the care providers in Sweden. Accordingly, the need to develop a system to support the processes in order to attain a standardized, structured, and systematic approach to improve preventive care processes for the elderly has been called for. The County Council of Jönköping developed a national Web-based quality registry, Senior Alert, with a focus on the following areas: falls, pressure ulcers, malnutrition, and oral health. The patients are evaluated using validated risk assessment instruments, and the care is planned, executed, evaluated. The registry supports the users to work with preventive care systematically and in a standardized way and provides feedback to the care providers on their preventive care processes. The registry helps the caregivers fulfill the preventive care according to the best available clinical knowledge and practice. The registry also provides the government and health care politicians with data for setting aims for elderly care. The registry is used in 90% of the municipalities and county councils throughout the country. The total number of risk assessments completed from 2009 to 2014 exceeded 1 000 000.
PubMed ID
25830619 View in PubMed
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What makes emergency department patients reduce their alcohol consumption?--a computer-based intervention study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117672
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Jan;21(1):3-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Anna Trinks
Karin Festin
Preben Bendtsen
Per Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Science, Division of Community Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. anna.trinks@liu.se
Source
Int Emerg Nurs. 2013 Jan;21(1):3-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Computer Terminals
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
This study investigates the effectiveness of a computerized emergency department intervention for alcohol consumption and identifies explanation factors associated with reduced alcohol consumption from risk to non-risk drinking.
Patients aged 18-69 years registered at the ED triage answered alcohol-related questions on a touch-screen computer. Follow-up data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire that was mailed to the patients 6 months after their ED visit.
There were four independent explanations for reduced alcohol consumption: being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider. 339 patients could be followed up and of these were 97 categorized as risk drinkers at baseline and 45 became non-risk drinker 6 month later.
Being motivated to reduce alcohol consumption at baseline, influenced by just visiting the emergency department, considering the alcohol-related feedback information and impact from a health care provider were predictors for change from risk to non-risk drinking 6 months later.
PubMed ID
23273798 View in PubMed
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