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Avoidable cost of alcohol abuse in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138671
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2011;17(2):72-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jürgen Rehm
Jayadeep Patra
William H Gnam
Anna Sarnocinska-Hart
Svetlana Popova
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, CAMH, Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2011;17(2):72-9
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics - prevention & control
Alcoholism - economics - mortality
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy - economics
Humans
Models, Economic
Abstract
To estimate avoidable burden and avoidable costs of alcohol abuse in Canada for the year 2002.
A policy effectiveness approach was used. The impact of six effective and cost-effective alcohol policy interventions aimed to reduce alcohol consumption was modeled. In addition, the effect of privatized alcohol sales that would increase alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributable costs was also modeled. The effects of these interventions were compared with the baseline (aggregate) costs obtained from the second Canadian Study of Social Costs Attributable to Substance Abuse.
It was estimated that by implementing six cost-effective policies from about 900 million to two billion Canadian dollars per year could be saved in Canada. The greatest savings due to the implementation of these interventions would be achieved in the lowering of productivity losses, followed by health care, and criminality. Substantial increases in burden and cost would occur if Canadian provinces were to privatize alcohol sales.
The implementation of proven effective population-based interventions would reduce alcohol-attributable burden and its costs in Canada to a considerable degree.
PubMed ID
21150206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost of privatisation versus government alcohol retailing systems: Canadian example.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136668
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Jan;31(1):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Svetlana Popova
Jayadeep Patra
Anna Sarnocinska-Hart
William H Gnam
Norman Giesbrecht
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Public Health and Regulatory Policies, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. lana_popova@camh.net
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2012 Jan;31(1):4-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol-Related Disorders - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Computer simulation
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Privatization - economics
Abstract
Alcohol retail monopolies have been established in many countries to restrict alcohol availability and thus, minimise alcohol-related harm.The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of the privatisation of alcohol sales on the burden and direct health-care, law enforcement costs and indirect costs (lost productivity due to disability or premature mortality) in Canada.
Simulation modelling. International Guidelines for the Estimation of the Avoidable Costs of Substance Abuse were used. All burden and costs were compared with the baseline taken from the aggregate Cost Study on Substance Abuse in Canada 2002.
If all Canadian provinces and territories were to privatise alcohol sales we assume that consumption would increase from 10% to 20% based on available Canadian literature. Under the 10% scenario the costs would increase from 6% ($828 million) and under the 20% scenario costs would increase 12% ($1.6 billion).This increase is substantially greater than the tax and mark-up revenue gained from increased sales,and represents a net loss.
Alcohol-attributable burden and associated costs will increase markedly if all Canadian provinces and territories gave up the government alcohol retailing systems.For public health and economic reasons, governments should continue to have a strong role in alcohol retailing.
PubMed ID
21355934 View in PubMed
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The costs of alcohol, illegal drugs, and tobacco in Canada, 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160623
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 Nov;68(6):886-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Jürgen Rehm
William Gnam
Svetlana Popova
Dolly Baliunas
Serge Brochu
Benedikt Fischer
Jayadeep Patra
Anna Sarnocinska-Hart
Benjamin Taylor
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Room 2035B, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2S1, Canada. jtrehm@aol.com
Source
J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2007 Nov;68(6):886-95
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - economics
Canada - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Crime
Female
Humans
Male
Marijuana Abuse - economics
Smoking - economics
Substance-Related Disorders - economics
Time Factors
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate costs attributable to substance use and misuse in Canada in 2002.
Based on information about prevalence of exposure and risk relations for more than 80 disease categories, deaths, years of life lost, and hospitalizations attributable to substance use and misuse were estimated. In addition, substance-attributable fractions for criminal justice expenditures were derived. Indirect costs were estimated using a modified human capital approach.
Costs of substance use and misuse totaled almost Can. $40 billion in 2002. The total cost per capita for substance use and misuse was about Can. $1,267: Can. $463 for alcohol, Can. $262 for illegal drugs, and Can. $541 for tobacco. Legal substances accounted for the vast majority of these costs (tobacco: almost 43% of total costs; alcohol: 37%). Indirect costs or productivity losses were the largest cost category (61%), followed by health care (22%) and law enforcement costs (14%). More than 40,000 people died in Canada in 2002 because of substance use and misuse: 37,209 deaths were attributable to tobacco, 4,258 were attributable to alcohol, and 1,695 were attributable to illegal drugs. A total of about 3.8 million hospital days were attributable to substance use and misuse, again mainly to tobacco.
Substance use and misuse imposes a considerable economic toll on Canadian society and requires more preventive efforts.
PubMed ID
17960307 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of a smoking cessation policy on visits to a psychiatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153632
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;53(11):779-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Paul Kurdyak
John Cairney
Anna Sarnocinska-Hart
Russell C Callahan
Carol Strike
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario. paul_kurdyak@camh.net
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;53(11):779-82
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Services, Psychiatric - utilization
Health Policy
Hospitals, Psychiatric - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Ontario
Psychotic Disorders
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Smoking cessation policies are increasingly imposed in mental health facilities because of the high prevalence of tobacco smoking and its related adverse health consequences. The objective of this study was to measure the impact of 2 smoking cessation policies--one imposed in a specific psychiatric hospital and the other across the entire province of Ontario--on weekly visit rates to a psychiatric emergency department.
Administrative data records from consecutive patient visits to a psychiatric emergency department were grouped by week from March 1, 2002, to December 31, 2005. The patients were grouped into 3 broad diagnostic categories: substance-related disorders, psychotic disorders, and other disorders. The impact of 2 smoking cessation policies--one imposed on September 21, 2005 at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and one imposed on May 31, 2006 across the province of Ontario--on psychiatric emergency department visit rates was measured using time series analysis.
The CAMH-specific smoking cessation policy had no impact on psychiatric emergency department visit rates in any diagnostic category. The province-wide smoking cessation policy resulted in a 15.5% reduction in patient visits for patients with a primary diagnosis of psychotic disorder.
The benefits of a smoking cessation policy need to be balanced by the impact of the policy on the likelihood of patients to seek treatment.
PubMed ID
19087472 View in PubMed
Less detail