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Association Between Distance From Home to Tobacco Outlet and Smoking Cessation and Relapse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282305
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Anna Pulakka
Jaana I Halonen
Ichiro Kawachi
Jaana Pentti
Sari Stenholm
Markus Jokela
Ilkka Kaate
Markku Koskenvuo
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Source
JAMA Intern Med. 2016 Oct 01;176(10):1512-1519
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Commerce
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Products
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
Reduced availability of tobacco outlets is hypothesized to reduce smoking, but longitudinal evidence on this issue is scarce.
To examine whether changes in distance from home to tobacco outlet are associated with changes in smoking behaviors.
The data from 2 prospective cohort studies included geocoded residential addresses, addresses of tobacco outlets, and responses to smoking surveys in 2008 and 2012 (the Finnish Public Sector [FPS] study, n?=?53?755) or 2003 and 2012 (the Health and Social Support [HeSSup] study, n?=?11?924). All participants were smokers or ex-smokers at baseline. We used logistic regression in between-individual analyses and conditional logistic regression in case-crossover design analyses to examine change in walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet as a predictor of quitting smoking in smokers and smoking relapse in ex-smokers. Study-specific estimates were pooled using fixed-effect meta-analysis.
Walking distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet.
Quitting smoking and smoking relapse as indicated by self-reported current and previous smoking at baseline and follow-up.
Overall, 20?729 men and women (age range 18-75 years) were recruited. Of the 6259 and 2090 baseline current smokers, 1744 (28%) and 818 (39%) quit, and of the 8959 and 3421 baseline ex-smokers, 617 (7%) and 205 (6%) relapsed in the FPS and HeSSup studies, respectively. Among the baseline smokers, a 500-m increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet was associated with a 16% increase in odds of quitting smoking in the between-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.28) and 57% increase in within-individual analysis (pooled odds ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.32-1.86), after adjusting for changes in self-reported marital and working status, substantial worsening of financial situation, illness in the family, and own health status. Increase in distance to the nearest tobacco outlet was not associated with smoking relapse among the ex-smokers.
These data suggest that increase in distance from home to the nearest tobacco outlet may increase quitting among smokers. No effect of change in distance on relapse in ex-smokers was observed.
PubMed ID
27533777 View in PubMed
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Change in Neighborhood Disadvantage and Change in Smoking Behaviors in Adults: A Longitudinal, Within-individual Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289311
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2016
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Anna Pulakka
Sari Stenholm
Jaana Pentti
Ichiro Kawachi
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
From the aFinnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; bDepartment of Public Health, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; cSchool of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; dDepartment of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; eDepartment of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School, London, United Kingdom; fClinicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; and gTurku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 11; 27(6):803-9
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Over Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Smoking - economics - epidemiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
Evidence for an association between neighborhood disadvantage and smoking is mixed and mainly based on cross-sectional studies. To shed light on the causality of this association, we examined whether change in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with within-individual change in smoking behaviors.
The study population comprised participants of the Finnish Public Sector study who reported a change in their smoking behavior between surveys in 2008/2009 and 2012/2013. We linked participants' residential addresses to a total population database on neighborhood disadvantage with 250?×?250-m resolution. The outcome variables were changes in smoking status (being a smoker vs. not) as well as the intensity (heavy/moderate vs. light smoker). We used longitudinal case-crossover design, a method that accounts for time-invariant confounders by design. We adjusted models for time-varying covariates.
Of the 3,443 participants, 1,714 quit, while 967 began to smoke between surveys. Smoking intensity increased among 398 and decreased among 364 participants. The level of neighborhood disadvantage changed for 1,078 participants because they moved residence. Increased disadvantage was associated with increased odds of being a smoker (odds ratio of taking up smoking 1.23 [95% confidence interval: 1.2, 1.5] per 1 SD increase in standardized national disadvantage score). Odds ratio for being a heavy/moderate (vs. light) smoker was 1.14 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 1.52) when disadvantage increased by 1 SD.
These within-individual results link an increase in neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage, due to move in residence, with subsequent smoking behaviors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27337178 View in PubMed
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Change in physical activity and accumulation of cardiometabolic risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300378
Source
Prev Med. 2018 07; 112:31-37
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Tuija Leskinen
Sari Stenholm
Olli J Heinonen
Anna Pulakka
Ville Aalto
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Finland; Paavo Nurmi Centre & Department of Health and Physical Activity, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Electronic address: tuija.leskinen@utu.fi.
Source
Prev Med. 2018 07; 112:31-37
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology
Dyslipidemias - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
This study aims to examine the association between change in physical activity over time and accumulation of cardiometabolic risk factors. Four consecutive surveys (Time 1 to 4) were conducted with 4-year intervals in 1997-2013 (the Finnish Public Sector study). Physical activity of 15,634 cardio-metabolically healthy participants (mean age 43.3 (SD 8.7) years, 85% women) was assessed using four-item survey measure and was expressed as weekly metabolic equivalent (MET) hours in Time 1, 2, and 3. At each time point, participants were categorised into low (
PubMed ID
29605421 View in PubMed
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Trajectories of risky drinking around the time of statutory retirement: a longitudinal latent class analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291021
Source
Addiction. 2017 Jul; 112(7):1163-1170
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Jaana I Halonen
Sari Stenholm
Anna Pulakka
Ichiro Kawachi
Ville Aalto
Jaana Pentti
Tea Lallukka
Marianna Virtanen
Jussi Vahtera
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki/Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Addiction. 2017 Jul; 112(7):1163-1170
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Risk-Taking
Abstract
Life transitions such as retirement may influence alcohol consumption, but only a few studies have described this using longitudinal data. We identified patterns and predictors of risky drinking around the time of retirement.
A cohort study assessing trajectories and predictors of risky drinking among employees entering statutory retirement between 2000 and 2011.
A total of 5805 men and women from the Finnish Public Sector study who responded to questions on alcohol consumption one to three times prior to (w-3 , w-2 , w-1 ), and one to three times after (w+1 , w+2 , w+3 ) retirement.
We assessed trajectories of risky drinking (> 24 units per week among men, > 16 units among women, or an extreme drinking occasion during past year) from pre- to post-retirement, as well as predictors of each alcohol consumption trajectory.
Three trajectories were identified: sustained healthy drinking (81% of participants), temporary increase in risky drinking around retirement (12%) and slowly declining risky drinking after retirement (7%). The strongest pre-retirement predictors for belonging to the group of temporary increase in risky drinking were current smoking [odds ratio (OR) = 3.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.70-5.64], male sex (OR = 2.77, 95% CI = 2.16-3.55), depression (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.05-1.99) and work-place in the metropolitan area (OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.00-1.66). Compared with the slowly declining risky drinking group, the temporary increase in risky drinking group was characterized by lower occupational status and education, and work-place outside the metropolitan area.
In Finland, approximately 12% of people who reach retirement age experience a temporary increase in alcohol consumption to risky levels, while approximately 7% experience a slow decline in risky levels of alcohol consumption. Male gender, smoking, being depressed and working in a metropolitan area are associated with increased likelihood of increased alcohol consumption.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28257157 View in PubMed
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