Skip header and navigation

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Construct validity of the Swedish version of the revised piper fatigue scale in an oncology sample--a Rasch analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104148
Source
Value Health. 2014 Jun;17(4):360-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Asa Lundgren-Nilsson
Anna Dencker
Sofie Jakobsson
Charles Taft
Alan Tennant
Author Affiliation
Centre for Person-centred Care, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Value Health. 2014 Jun;17(4):360-3
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Fatigue - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - physiopathology - psychology - radiotherapy
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom in cancer patients due to both the disease and its treatments. The concept of fatigue is multidimensional and includes both physical and mental components. The 22-item Revised Piper Fatigue Scale (RPFS) is a multidimensional instrument developed to assess cancer-related fatigue. This study reports on the construct validity of the Swedish version of the RPFS from the perspective of Rasch measurement.
The Swedish version of the RPFS was answered by 196 cancer patients fatigued after 4 to 5 weeks of curative radiation therapy. Data from the scale were fitted to the Rasch measurement model. This involved testing a series of assumptions, including the stochastic ordering of items, local response dependency, and unidimensionality. A series of fit statistics were computed, differential item functioning (DIF) was tested, and local response dependency was accommodated through testlets.
The Behavioral, Affective and Sensory domains all satisfied the Rasch model expectations. No DIF was observed, and all domains were found to be unidimensional. The Mood/Cognitive scale failed to fit the model, and substantial multidimensionality was found. Splitting the scale between Mood and Cognitive items resolved fit to the Rasch model, and new domains were unidimensional without DIF.
The current Rasch analyses add to the evidence of measurement properties of the scale and show that the RPFS has good psychometric properties and works well to measure fatigue. The original four-factor structure, however, was not supported.
PubMed ID
24968995 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identification of latent phase factors associated with active labor duration in low-risk nulliparous women with spontaneous contractions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96323
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Aug;89(8):1034-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Anna Dencker
Marie Berg
Liselotte Bergqvist
Håkan Lilja
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Perinatal Center, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. anna.dencker@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2010 Aug;89(8):1034-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to identify latent phase predictors of active labor duration. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Two delivery units in Sweden. SAMPLE: Healthy nulliparous women with a normal pregnancy, spontaneous onset of active labor at term, and a cervical dilatation of 4 cm or more on admission to the delivery ward (n = 2,072). METHODS: The women were asked to answer questions concerning their food and fluid intake, amount of rest and sleep during the preceding 24 hours and to assess their labor pain, sense of security and expectations of the childbirth on a visual analog scale (VAS). Duration and intervals of contractions, cervical dilatation, and position of the fetal head were noted by the midwife. A multiple regression analysis was performed with active labor duration as the outcome variable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Predictive factors of active labor duration. RESULTS: Normal food intake during the preceding 24 hours was associated with short labor duration. A long latent phase, low levels of assessed labor pain and few hours of rest and sleep during the preceding 24 hours were significant independent predictors of extended active labor duration, when high birth weight, long contraction intervals, slight cervical dilatation, intact membranes within 2 hours of admission, high maternal age and malposition of the fetal head were controlled for. CONCLUSION: New findings are that latent phase duration as well as food intake and the amount of rest and sleep during the preceding 24 hours are independent predictors of labor duration.
PubMed ID
20636242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measuring women's experiences of decision-making and aspects of midwifery support: a confirmatory factor analysis of the revised Childbirth Experience Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306319
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Apr 06; 20(1):199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-06-2020
Author
Anna Dencker
Liselotte Bergqvist
Marie Berg
Josephine T V Greenbrook
Christina Nilsson
Ingela Lundgren
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 457, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. anna.dencker@gu.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2020 Apr 06; 20(1):199
Date
Apr-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Decision Making
Delivery, Obstetric - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Midwifery
Parturition - psychology
Patient satisfaction
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
Women's experiences of labour and birth can have both short- and long-term effects on their physical and psychological health. The original Swedish version of the Childbirth Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) has shown to have good psychometric quality and ability to differentiate between groups known to differ in childbirth experience. Two subscales were revised in order to include new items with more relevant content about decision-making and aspects of midwifery support. The aim of the study was to develop new items in two subscales and to test construct validity and reliability of the revised version of CEQ, called CEQ2.
A total of 11 new items (Professional Support and Participation) and 14 original items from the first CEQ (Own capacity and Perceived safety), were answered by 682 women with spontaneous onset of labour. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to analyse model fit.
The hypothesised four-factor model showed good fit (CMIN?=?2.79; RMR?=?0.33; GFI?=?0.94; CFI?=?0.94; TLI?=?0.93; RMSEA?=?0.054 and PCLOSE?=?0.12) Cronbach's alpha was good for all subscales (0.82, 0.83, 0.76 and 0.73) and for the total scale (0.91).
CEQ2, like the first CEQ, yields four important aspects of experience during labour and birth showing good psychometric performance, including decision-making and aspects of midwifery support, in both primiparous and multiparous women.
PubMed ID
32252679 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multidimensional fatigue inventory and post-polio syndrome - a Rasch analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268250
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2015;13:20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Dencker
Katharina S Sunnerhagen
Charles Taft
Åsa Lundgren-Nilsson
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2015;13:20
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Fatigue - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome - epidemiology
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Fatigue is a common symptom in post-polio syndrome (PPS) and can have a substantial impact on patients. There is a need for validated questionnaires to assess fatigue in PPS for use in clinical practice and research. The aim with this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Swedish version of Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) in patients with PPS using the Rasch model.
A total of 231 patients diagnosed with PPS completed the Swedish MFI-20 questionnaire at post-polio out-patient clinics in Sweden. The mean age of participants was 62 years and 61% were females. Data were tested against assumptions of the Rasch measurement model (i.e. unidimensionality of the scale, good item fit, independency of items and absence of differential item functioning). Reliability was tested with the person separation index (PSI). A transformation of the ordinal total scale scores into an interval scale for use in parametric analysis was performed. Dummy cases with minimum and maximum scoring were used for the transformation table to achieve interval scores between 20 and 100, which are comprehensive limits for the MFI-20 scale.
An initial Rasch analysis of the full scale with 20 items showed misfit to the Rasch model (p?
Notes
Cites: Stat Med. 2000 Jun 15-30;19(11-12):1651-8310844726
Cites: Spinal Cord. 2001 May;39(5):243-5111438839
Cites: Support Care Cancer. 2001 Jul;9(5):355-6011497389
Cites: J Appl Meas. 2002;3(2):205-3112011501
Cites: Onkologie. 2003 Apr;26(2):140-412771522
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2003 Jul;10(4):407-1312823493
Cites: Med Care. 2004 Jan;42(1 Suppl):I37-4814707754
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1989 Nov;70(12):857-602818162
Cites: Orthopedics. 1991 Nov;14(11):1269-761758794
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Jan 21;310(6973):1707833759
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1995 Apr;39(3):315-257636775
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1996 Jan;73(2):241-58546913
Cites: Muscle Nerve. 2005 Jan;31(1):6-1915599928
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2006 Jun;5(6):493-50016713921
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2006 Aug;13(8):795-80116879288
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2007;46(1):97-10417438711
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2007 Dec 15;57(8):1358-6218050173
Cites: Disabil Rehabil. 2007 Nov 30;29(22):1665-7017852297
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):107-2819111779
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:3719400966
Cites: PM R. 2009 May;1(5):442-919627931
Cites: Br J Math Stat Psychol. 2010 Feb;63(Pt 1):101-1119341515
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2011 Jan;43(1):39-4521174052
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 Jun;92(6):899-90421621666
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2011 Oct;43(10):884-9121947180
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2013 Jul;45(7):685-9323803711
Cites: Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2014;12:2424559076
PubMed ID
25879413 View in PubMed
Less detail