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Association between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269469
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Nov;72(8):1039-46
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Carbonated Beverages
Computers
DMF Index
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Meals
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Periodontal Index
Sex Factors
Snacks
Sports
Sweden
Television
Tooth Erosion - classification
Toothbrushing
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the relationship between soft drink consumption, oral health and some lifestyle factors in Swedish adolescents.
A clinical dental examination and a questionnaire concerning lifestyle factors, including drinking habits, oral hygiene, dietary consumption, physical activity and screen-viewing habits were completed. Three hundred and ninety-two individuals completed the study (13-14 years, n = 195; 18-19 years, n = 197). The material was divided into high and low carbonated soft drink consumption groups, corresponding to approximately the highest and the lowest one-third of subjects in each age group. Differences between the groups were tested by the Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression.
Intake of certain dietary items, tooth brushing, sports activities, meal patterns, screen-viewing behaviors, BMI and parents born outside Sweden differed significantly between high and low consumers in one or both of the two age groups. Dental erosion (both age groups) and DMFT/DMFS (18-19 years group) were significantly higher in the high consumption groups. Logistic regression showed predictive variables for high consumption of carbonated soft drinks to be mainly gender (male), unhealthy dietary habits, lesser physical activity, higher BMI and longer time spent in front of TV/computer.
High soft drink consumption was related to poorer oral health and an unhealthier lifestyle.
PubMed ID
25183250 View in PubMed
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A 4 year prospective longitudinal study of progression of dental erosion associated to lifestyle in 13-14 year-old Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282697
Source
J Dent. 2016 Apr;47:55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Source
J Dent. 2016 Apr;47:55-62
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology
Dental Plaque - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Gingivitis - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Erosion - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
To evaluate the progression of dental erosion in 13-14 year-olds after 4 years, and its association with lifestyle and oral health.
227 randomly selected 13-14 year-olds from a Public Dental Clinic, Örebro, Sweden, were investigated. A clinical examination was performed which included dental caries/gingival/plaque status, as well as grading of dental erosion at the tooth surface and participant levels in "marker teeth", including buccal/palatal surfaces of 6 maxillary anterior teeth (13-23), and occlusal surfaces of first molars. An interview and a questionnaire regarding drinking habits and other lifestyle factors were completed. All investigations were repeated at follow-up. The participants were divided into high and low progression erosion groups and logistic regression statistics were applied.
175 individuals participated at follow-up. Progression occurred in 35% of the 2566 tooth surfaces. 32% of the surfaces had deteriorated by one severity grade (n=51 individuals) and 3% by two grades (n=2 individuals). Boys showed more severe erosion than girls at the follow-up. Among the variables predicting greater progression, a lower severity of erosive wear at baseline had the highest OR (13.3), followed in descending order by a "retaining" drinking technique, more frequent intake of drinks between meals, low GBI and lesser sour milk intake, with reference to the baseline recording. Using these five variables, sensitivity and specificity were 87% and 67% respectively, for predicting progression of erosion.
Progression of erosive lesions in Swedish adolescents aged 13-14 years followed up to age 17-18 years was common and related to certain lifestyle factors.
In permanent teeth, dental erosion may develop early in life and its progression is common. Dental health workers should be made aware of this fact and regular screenings for erosion and recording of associated lifestyle factors should be performed.
PubMed ID
26867982 View in PubMed
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Dental erosion and soft drink consumption in Swedish children and adolescents and the development of a simplified erosion partial recording system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137205
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Agneta Hasselkvist
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Public Dental Health, Orebro County Council, Orebro, Sweden. agneta.hasselkvist@orebroll.se
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(4):187-95
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Beverages - adverse effects
Carbonated Beverages - adverse effects
Child
Dental Enamel - pathology
Drinking Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Observer Variation
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Erosion - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of dental erosion among Swedish children and adolescents and to examine its relation to soft drink consumption. It was hypothesized that the prevalence of dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls,that it would show a correlation with soft drink consumption and that a further simplification ofa previously-used partial recording screening system for dental erosion would have an acceptable sensitivity and specificity. 801 individuals were invited to participate, of whom 609 (75%) accepted. 135 were 5-6 years, 227 were 13-14 years, and 247 were18-19 years old. A questionnaire survey of each individual's soft drink consumption habits, in addition to a clinical examination, were performed. Severe erosion extending into dentine on one or more maxillary anterior teeth/ molars was found to be 13.3% in the 5-6 group, 11.9% in 13-14 group and 22.3% in 18-19 group. The total prevalence for all age groups was 16.4%. The severity of erosion was highest among 18-19 year-old boys, 34.4 % of whom exhibited one or more teeth with severe erosive damage while none of the girls did so. Soft drink consumption was significantly correlated with severity of dental erosion in the 18-19 and 13-14 groups but not in the 5-6 years old group. A simplified erosion partial recording system (SEPRS) using 4 (permanent) or 6 (primary) surfaces as markers showed excellent sensitivity (100%/100%, respectively) and specificity (98%/100%, respectively) in relation to scoring of all maxillary canines/incisors and first permanent/all primary molars. In view of the high prevalence of dental erosion and soft drink consumption among Swedish children and adolescents reported here,there is clearly a need for a national epidemiological registration system as well as for community-based preventive programs to be implemented. The hypothesis that dental erosion would be higher in boys than girls and that it would show a correlation with soft drink intake was confirmed.
PubMed ID
21306084 View in PubMed
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Resting and stimulated whole salivary flow rates in Sjögren's syndrome patients over time: a diagnostic aid for subsidized dental care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13751
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Oct;62(5):264-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Lars Jorkjend
Anders Johansson
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Axel Bergenholtz
Author Affiliation
Section of Dental Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2004 Oct;62(5):264-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Eligibility Determination - methods
Female
Humans
Insurance, Dental
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate
Sjogren's Syndrome - diagnosis
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to evaluate Swedish and Norwegian criteria currently applied in the assessment of eligibility for subsidized dental care of Sjogren's syndrome (SS) patients. These criteria are partly based on a single salivary test showing a resting whole salivary secretion rate of
PubMed ID
15841813 View in PubMed
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Eating disorders and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders: a matched case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99957
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(3):139-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Anders Johansson
Lennart Unell
Claes Norring
Gunnar E Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry--Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. Ann-Katrin.Johansson@iko.uib.no
Source
Swed Dent J. 2010;34(3):139-47
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Binge-Eating Disorder - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Bulimia Nervosa - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Eating Disorders - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with eating disorders (ED) and to compare the prevalence with that in sex- and age-matched controls. During a 12-month period, all patients (n = 65) who accepted and initiated psychiatric/medical outpatient treatment in an Eating Disorder Clinic/Erikbergsgården, Orebro, Sweden were invited to participate in the study. Of the ED patients, 54 (83%) accepted participation. ED patients and controls underwent a comprehensive TMD questionnaire and clinical examination. Reported symptoms such as headache, facial pain,jaw tiredness, tongue thrusting, and lump feeling in the throat as well as dizziness, concentration difficulties and sleep disturbances were all significantly more prevalent among ED patients compared to controls. There was also a significantly higher prevalence of clinical TMD signs in the ED patients. Analyses within the ED group showed that those who reported self-induced vomiting reported significantly more heavy feeling in the head, nausea and snoring. Those with binge eating reported significantly more heavy feeling in the head, facial pain, dizzy feeling and concentration difficulties. No significant differences regarding subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD were found within the ED group with respect to duration of ED. In conclusion, orofacial pain and TMD related signs and symptoms are significantly more common in ED patients than in matched control subjects. Special emphasis should be made to those who reports vomiting and/or binge eating behaviors.
PubMed ID
21121413 View in PubMed
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Self-reported dry mouth in Swedish population samples aged 50, 65 and 75 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129938
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Anders Johansson
Lennart Unell
Gunnar Ekbäck
Sven Ordell
Gunnar E Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry-Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ann-katrin.johansson@iko.uib.no
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e107-15
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Age Factors
Aged
Attitude to Health
Burning Mouth Syndrome - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mastication - physiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Saliva - physiology - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Self Report
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Xerostomia - epidemiology
Abstract
Reduced salivary flow may have a negative impact on general well-being, quality of life and oral health.
To examine xerostomia in 50-, 65- and 75-year-olds, background factors and effect on Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP).
In 1992, a questionnaire was sent to all 50-year-old persons (n = 8888) in two Swedish counties. In 2007, the same questionnaire was sent to all 65-year-olds (n = 8313) in the two counties and to all 75-year-olds (n = 5195). Response rate was for the 50, 65 and 75 year olds 71.4, 73.1 and 71.9%, respectively.
Xerostomia was higher in women than in men in all age groups. There was higher prevalence of xerostomia with increasing age in both sexes and it was more frequent at night than during daytime. 'Often mouth dryness' was 2.6-3.4 times more prevalent in those who reported an impact from OIDP. The highest odd ratios were for daytime xerostomia and for the variables burning mouth (17.1), not feeling healthy (4.5), daily smoking (4.4), and medication (4.1).
The dramatic increase of xerostomia between age 50 and 75, especially amongst women, needs to be considered in the management of this age group.
PubMed ID
22050189 View in PubMed
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Eating disorders - knowledge, attitudes, management and clinical experience of Norwegian dentists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299043
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 14; 15(1):124
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Oct-14-2015
Author
Ann-Katrin Johansson
Anders Johansson
Eva Nohlert
Claes Norring
Anne Nordrehaug Åstrøm
Åke Tegelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Dentistry - Cariology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Årstadveien 19, N-5009, Bergen, Norway. Ann-Katrin.Johansson@iko.uib.no.
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2015 Oct 14; 15(1):124
Date
Oct-14-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Dentist-Patient Relations
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Female
General Practice, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health
Practice Patterns, Dentists'
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate knowledge, attitudes and clinical experience with regard to patients with eating disorders (ED) among Norwegian dentists.
In 2010, a questionnaire was sent to all dentists in Norway (N?=?4282) comprising 33 questions related to demographics of the participating dentists, their knowledge of ED (general and oral health aspects), clinical experience, attitudes and perceived management preferences.
The participation rate was 40 % (47 % women and 53 % men). Their knowledge about ED was often retrieved from common media sources and the greater part of the participants reported they had seen very few patients with ED during their professional career. Female dentists reported superior knowledge about ED compared to males, but the former experienced greater difficulties to inform about the condition. Referrals of the patient to other health facilities were significantly more common among female compared to male dentists. The majority of dentists (76 %) reported a need of more education related to ED management.
The Norwegian dentists in this study reported limited clinical experience and insufficient knowledge regarding ED. There is therefore a need to increase both undergraduate and continuing education in this field, which can improve preventive and management measures that a dentist can provide for ED patients.
PubMed ID
26463731 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.