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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Food Index Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Type-2 Diabetes--The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273886
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sandra Amalie Lacoppidan
Cecilie Kyrø
Steffen Loft
Anne Helnæs
Jane Christensen
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet - ethnology - standards
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Type-2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Lifestyle factors, in particular obesity, diet, and physical activity play a significant role in the etiology of the disease. Of dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet has been studied, and generally a protective association has been identified. However, other regional diets are less explored.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and the risk of T2D. The index consists of six food items: fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples and pears, and root vegetables.
Data was obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, at baseline, of whom 7366 developed T2D (median follow-up: 15.3 years). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association between the healthy Nordic food index and risk of T2D, adjusted for potential confounders.
Greater adherence to the healthy Nordic food index was significantly associated with lower risk of T2D after adjusting for potential confounders. An index score of 5-6 points (high adherence) was associated with a statistically significantly 25% lower T2D risk in women (HR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.61-0.92) and 38% in men (HR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.53-0.71) compared to those with an index score of 0 points (poor adherence).
Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was found to be inversely associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that regional diets other than the Mediterranean may also be recommended for prevention of T2D.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26506373 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17245
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Marian Pavuk
Alain Leblanc
Pierre Dumas
Jean Philippe Weber
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Exposure to environmental organochlorines has been examined as a potential risk factor for human breast cancer with mixed results. Our purpose was to examine associations between organochlorines and the development of breast cancer in a large prospective study using stored adipose tissue. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study of 409 postmenopausal women who developed breast cancer and 409 controls selected from the 29,875 women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort between 1993 and 1997. We measured concentrations of 14 pesticides and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls in adipose tissue, collected upon enrollment, and estimated relative risk (RR) of breast cancer using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The results showed no higher risk of breast cancer among women with higher levels of any pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR associated with the upper quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2, 2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene concentration was 0.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.5-1.2] contrasting the lower quartile, and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls the similar risk was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7). We observed a pattern of substantially lower risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in association with higher levels of most of the pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR for the higher quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene was 0.1 (95% CI, 0.0-0.5) and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls it was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.9). CONCLUSION: The results do not support that higher organochlorine body levels increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The interpretation of the inverse association for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer is currently unclear.
PubMed ID
15668478 View in PubMed
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An association between dietary arachidonic acid, measured in adipose tissue, and ulcerative colitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140034
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Punyanganie S A de Silva
Anja Olsen
Jane Christensen
Erik Berg Schmidt
Kim Overvaad
Anne Tjonneland
Andrew R Hart
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Norwich, United Kingdom. punyanganie@yahoo.com
Source
Gastroenterology. 2010 Dec;139(6):1912-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism - pathology
Aged
Arachidonic Acid - adverse effects - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Dietary arachidonic acid, an n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA), might be involved in the etiology of ulcerative colitis (UC). We performed a prospective cohort study to determine whether high levels of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue samples (which reflects dietary intake) are associated with UC.
We analyzed data collected from 57,053 men and women in the EPIC-Denmark Prospective Cohort Study from 1993 to 1997. Adipose tissue biopsy samples were collected from gluteal regions at the beginning of the study, the cohort was monitored over subsequent years, and participants who developed UC were identified. A subcohort of 2510 randomly selected participants were used as controls. Concentrations of arachidonic acid were measured in adipose tissue samples. In the analysis, arachidonic acid levels were divided into quartiles; relative risks (RR) were calculated and adjusted for smoking, use of aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and levels of n-3 PUFAs.
A total of 34 subjects (56% men) developed incident UC at a median age of 58.8 years (range, 50.0-69.0 years). Those in the highest quartile for arachidonic acid concentrations in adipose tissue had an RR for UC of 4.16 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.56-11.04); a trend per 0.1% increase in arachidonic acid of 1.77 in RR was observed (95% CI: 1.38-2.27). The fraction attributed the highest levels of arachidonic acid was 40.3%.
Individuals with the highest relative concentrations of arachidonic acid in adipose tissue have a significantly greater risk of developing UC. Dietary modifications might therefore prevent UC or reduce disease symptoms.
PubMed ID
20950616 View in PubMed
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Association between 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine excretion and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer: nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114047
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Jul;22(7):1289-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Steffen Loft
Anja Olsen
Peter Møller
Henrik E Poulsen
Anne Tjønneland
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Section of Enviromental Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. stl@sund.ku.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2013 Jul;22(7):1289-96
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism - urine
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
DNA Damage
Denmark - epidemiology
Deoxyguanosine - analogs & derivatives - urine
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress - genetics - physiology
Postmenopause - genetics - urine
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Estrogen - biosynthesis
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - urine
Abstract
Oxidative stress may be important in carcinogenesis and a possible risk factor for breast cancer. The urinary excretion of oxidatively generated biomolecules, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), represents biomarkers of oxidative stress, reflecting the rate of global damage to DNA in steady state.
In a nested case-control design, we examined associations between urinary excretion of 8-oxodG and risk of breast cancer in a population-based cohort of 24,697 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 64 years with 3 to 7 years follow-up. The accruing cases of breast cancer were matched to controls by age at diagnosis, baseline age, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Spot urine samples collected at entry was analyzed for 8-oxodG by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Incidence rate ratio (IRR; 95% confidence intervals) based on 336 matched pairs with all information was estimated per unit increase in 8-oxodG divided by creatinine for all and estrogen receptor (ER) positive and negative breast cancers.
There was a borderline significant positive association between 8-oxodG and risk of all breast cancer (IRR: 1.08; 1.00-1.17 per unit increase in nmol/mmol creatinine). This association was significant with respect to the risk of ER-positive cancer (IRR: 1.11; 1.01-1.23) and among women not using HRT (IRR: 1.11; 0.97-1.26) or with low dietary iron intake (IRR: 1.10; 1.06-1.37 per unit increase) for all breast cancer.
We observed positive association between 8-oxodG excretion and risk of especially ER-positive breast cancer.
Our results suggest that oxidative stress with damage to DNA is important for the development of breast cancer.
PubMed ID
23658396 View in PubMed
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Associations between GPX1 Pro198Leu polymorphism, erythrocyte GPX activity, alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76101
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Gitte Ravn-Haren
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Lars O Dragsted
Bjørn A Nexø
Håkan Wallin
Kim Overvad
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Ulla Vogel
Author Affiliation
Department of Toxicology and Risk Assessment, Danish Institute for Food and Veterinary Research, Søborg, Denmark. grh@dfvf.dk
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2006 Apr;27(4):820-5
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glutathione Peroxidase - genetics - metabolism
Humans
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
Breast cancer may be related to oxidative stress. Breast cancer patients have been reported to have lower antioxidant enzyme activity than healthy controls and the polymorphism GPX1 Pro198Leu has been associated with risk of lung and breast cancer. The purpose of the present nested case-control study was to determine whether GPX1 Pro198Leu and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in prospectively collected blood samples are associated with breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women and whether GPX activity levels are associated with other known breast cancer risk factors. We matched 377 female breast cancer cases with 377 controls all nested within the prospective 'Diet, Cancer and Health' study of 57 000 Danes. Carriers of the variant T-allele of GPX1 Pro198Leu were at 1.43-fold higher risk of breast cancer compared with non-carriers (95% CI=1.07-1.92). Pre-diagnostic GPX activity tended to be lower in cases compared with controls. GPX activity was positively correlated with intake of alcohol (P
PubMed ID
16287877 View in PubMed
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Body mass index and participation in organized mammographic screening: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272285
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:294
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sophie Sell Hellmann
Sisse Helle Njor
Elsebeth Lynge
My von Euler-Chelpin
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Ilse Vejborg
Zorana Jovanovic Andersen
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:294
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Humans
Mammography - methods
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Patient Participation
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thinness - epidemiology
Abstract
Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women, and early diagnosis is essential for future prognosis. Evidence from mainly cross-sectional US studies with self-reported exposure and outcome found positive association of body mass index (BMI) with non-participation in mammographic screening, but hardly addressed the influence of potential effect-modifiers. We studied the association between objective measures of BMI and participation in mammographic screening in a Danish prospective cohort, and explored the influence of menopausal status, hormone therapy (HT), previous screening participation, and morbidities on this relationship.
A total of 5,134 women from the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort who were invited to population based mammographic screening in Copenhagen were included in analysis. Women were 50-64 years old at inclusion (1993-97) when their height and weight were measured and covariates collected via questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between BMI and mammographic screening participation were estimated by logistic regression, adjusted for other breast cancer risk factors and morbidities. Effect modification was evaluated by an interaction term and tested by Wald test.
Underweight (BMI
Notes
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PubMed ID
25880028 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of Norwegian women eating wholegrain bread.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274503
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Oct;18(15):2836-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Toril Bakken
Tonje Braaten
Anja Olsen
Eiliv Lund
Guri Skeie
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Oct;18(15):2836-45
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Bread
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Eating
Edible Grain
Energy intake
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage
Life Style
Middle Aged
Norway
Residence Characteristics
Smoking
Thiamine - administration & dosage
Abstract
To investigate dietary and non-dietary characteristics of wholegrain bread eaters in the Norwegian Women and Cancer study.
Cross-sectional study using an FFQ.
Women were divided into two groups according to wholegrain bread consumption.
Adult women (n 69 471).
Median daily consumption of standardized slices of wholegrain bread was 2·5 in the low intake group and 4·5 in the high intake group. The OR for high wholegrain bread consumption was 0·28, 2·19 and 4·63 for the first, third and fourth quartile of energy intake, respectively, compared with the second quartile. Living outside Oslo or in East Norway and having a high level of physical activity were associated with high wholegrain bread consumption. BMI and smoking were inversely associated with wholegrain bread consumption. Intake of many food items was positively associated with wholegrain bread consumption (P trend
PubMed ID
25711149 View in PubMed
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