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Assessing health status in Manitoba children: acute and chronic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15290
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S44-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita L Kozyrskyj
G Elske Hildes-Ripstein
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S44-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Adult
Child
Child Health Services - utilization
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Status Indicators
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Prevalence
Public Health Informatics
Regional Health Planning
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Numerous child health status measures have been developed, ranging from assessments of physical and mental health to activity continuums. Our objective was to report the regional distribution of physical morbidity among children in Manitoba. METHODS: Using Manitoba's population-based prescription and health care data for 1998/99, the prevalence of children with lower respiratory tract infections, four chronic conditions (asthma, cardiovascular disease, Type 1 diabetes mellitus and seizure disorders) and physical disabilities, including spina bifida and cerebral palsy, was determined for 12 Regional Health Authorities and 12 Winnipeg Community Areas, ranked by a measure of population healthiness, the premature mortality rate (PMR). Prescription rates were also reported by neighbourhood income quintile, derived from census data. RESULTS: Hospitalization for lower respiratory tract infection was highest in infants (6%) and increased with successive decreases in neighbourhood income or in the population healthiness of a region. On the basis of a physician diagnosis or prescription drug for asthma, 10% of school-age children had asthma. Asthma treatment rates in northern Manitoba were substantially lower than in Winnipeg. Treatment rates for cardiovascular conditions, Type I diabetes and seizure disorders approached 1% in adolescents and there were no regional differences in the distribution of these conditions. The prevalence of physical disability was highest in northern Manitoba. CONCLUSION: A minority of Manitoba children suffer from chronic and serious acute health problems in childhood, but the burden of illness is not evenly distributed among children.
PubMed ID
12580390 View in PubMed
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The association between community stressors and asthma prevalence of school children in Winnipeg, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125560
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Feb;9(2):579-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Tyler P Pittman
Candace I J Nykiforuk
Javier Mignone
Piush J Mandhane
Allan B Becker
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2J3, Canada. tpp@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Feb;9(2):579-95
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Asthma - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Humans
Prevalence
Abstract
It is generally surmised that community stressors have an incubating effect for a variety of diagnoses on maternal and child health. This is of public health significance, as children of mothers facing long-term distress were found to have a 60% higher risk for asthma diagnosis at age 7 in Manitoba, Canada. Our objective was to determine the association of community stressors with childhood asthma prevalence in Winnipeg, Canada from participants who completed the Study of Asthma, Genes and the Environment (SAGE) survey administered in 2002-2003 to a birth cohort from 1995. Measures of community socioeconomic makeup and community disorder with rank ordinalized by quintile at the census tract level were obtained from the 1996 Canada Census. Crime data (annual incidence per 10,000 persons) by neighbourhood profile for 2001 was provided by the Winnipeg Police Service. Dichotomous caregiver report of child asthma along with other indicators from the geocoded SAGE survey allowed linkage to 23 neighbourhood profiles. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the effect of community stressors on childhood asthma prevalence for birth and non-birth home children (N = 1472) and children resident of birth homes at age 7 or 8 (N = 698). After adjusting for individual risk factors, children resident of birth homes in a high thefts over $5,000 neighbourhood profile were twice as likely (Adjusted OR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.11-3.81) to have report of asthma compared to children in a lower thefts over $5,000 profile, with community thefts over $5,000 explaining over half of the observed neighbourhood variation in asthma.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22470311 View in PubMed
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Association of urokinase-type plasminogen activator with asthma and atopy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164633
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Jun 1;175(11):1109-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2007
Author
Philippe Bégin
Karine Tremblay
Denise Daley
Mathieu Lemire
Sébastien Claveau
Charleen Salesse
Sabine Kacel
Alexandre Montpetit
Allan Becker
Moira Chan-Yeung
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Thomas J Hudson
Catherine Laprise
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal Community Genomic Medicine Centre, Chicoutimi University Hospital, Saguenay, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Jun 1;175(11):1109-16
Date
Jun-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Asthma - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA - genetics
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prevalence
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator - blood - genetics
Abstract
Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) interacts with its receptor on inflammatory and migrating cells to regulate extracellular matrix degradation, cell adhesion, and inflammatory cell activation. It is necessary for the development of an appropriate immune response and is involved in tissue remodeling. The PLAU gene codes for this enzyme, and is located on 10q24. This region has demonstrated evidence for linkage in a genome scan for asthma in a sample from northeastern Quebec. Here, we hypothesized that uPA may function as a regulator of asthma susceptibility.
To test for association between asthma and genetic variants of PLAU.
We sequenced PLAU and tested for genetic association between identified variants and asthma-related traits in a French-Canadian familial collection (231 families, 1,139 subjects). Additional association studies were performed in two other family-based Canadian cohorts (Canadian Asthma Primary Prevention Study [CAPPS], 238 trios; and Study of Asthma Genes and the Environment [SAGE], 237 trios).
In the original sample, under the dominant model, the common alleles, rs2227564C (P141) and rs2227566T, were associated with asthma (p = 0.011 and 0.045, respectively) and with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) (p = 0.026 and 0.038, respectively). Analysis of the linkage disequilibrium pattern also revealed association of the common haplotype for asthma, atopy, and AHR (p = 0.031, 0.043, and 0.006, respectively). Whereas no significant association was detected for PLAU single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CAPPS cohort, association was observed in the SAGE cohort between the rs4065C allele and atopy under additive (p = 0.005) and dominant (p = 0.0001) genetic models.
This suggests a role for the uPA pathway in the pathogenesis of the disease.
PubMed ID
17363771 View in PubMed
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Asthma is not enough: continuation of smoking among parents with an asthmatic child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161179
Source
Can Respir J. 2007 Sep;14(6):349-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Joel J Liem
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Cecilia M Benoit
Allan B Becker
Author Affiliation
Section of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Can Respir J. 2007 Sep;14(6):349-53
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Parents
Prevalence
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Abstract
Ideally, on diagnosis of asthma in a child, parents are counselled to decrease environmental tobacco smoke exposure to their children.
To determine whether a diagnosis of asthma in children altered parental smoking behaviour toward a reduction in environmental tobacco smoke exposure.
In 2002/2003, a survey was sent to 12,556 households with children born in 1995 in Manitoba. Parents were asked whether their seven-year-old child had asthma, and whether smokers were present in the home in 1995 and/or currently. The likelihood (OR) of a change in parental smoking behaviour was determined according to the presence of asthma in their child, a family history of asthma, the location of residence (rural or urban) and their socioeconomic status.
A total of 3580 surveys (28.5%) were returned. The overall prevalence of parental smoking in 1995 and 2002/2003 was 32.2% and 23.4%, respectively (31.9%/23.2% and 32.3%/23.6% in rural and urban environments, respectively). In 2002/2003, the prevalence of parental smoking in homes with asthmatic children was 29.8%. Parents were not more likely to quit smoking (OR=1.01, 95% CI 0.66 to 1.54) or smoke outside (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.83) if their child developed asthma. Parental smoking behaviour (quit smoking or smoked outside) did not change if there was a positive family history of asthma (OR=1.04, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.37), if they lived in a rural or urban location (OR=0.94, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.23), or if they were from a low- or high-income household (OR=1.12, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.47).
The likelihood of altering parental smoking behaviour occurred independently of a diagnosis of asthma in their child, a family history of asthma, the location of residence and their socioeconomic status.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17885695 View in PubMed
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"Asthma isn't an excuse, it's just a condition": youths' perceptions of physical activity and screen time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124718
Source
J Asthma. 2012 Jun;49(5):496-501
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jennifer L P Protudjer
Jonathan M McGavock
Clare D Ramsey
Gustaaf P Sevenhuysen
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Allan B Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Health Sciences, Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. jprotudjer@ mich.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2012 Jun;49(5):496-501
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - physiopathology - psychology
Cohort Studies
Computers
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Sedentary lifestyle
Social Media
Abstract
During puberty, physical activity patterns begin to decline, while sedentary time increases. These changes may be confounded by asthma. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into youths' perceptions of screen time and physical activity by asthma status.
Four interviews and seven focus groups with boys only or girls only were conducted with 15- to 16-year-old youth enrolled in either of two asthma-focused cohorts in Manitoba, Canada. Using a semi-structured interview guide, youth were asked about their perceptions of physical activity and screen time such as texting, watching television, electronic games, and Internet chatting and about their perceptions of the influence that asthma has on these behaviors. Data were analyzed using thematic coding.
Two themes were common to youth with asthma and without asthma: (1) sports are an integral part of youths' lives and (2) screen time is important to youth. Two themes were identified among youth with asthma only: (1) physical activity used to be more difficult and (2) being active and living with asthma. Youth with asthma described physical activity as neither a hindrance to activity nor an excuse for inactivity, although asthma may still present some challenges. They also acknowledged their reliance on screen time for communication and for entertainment.
Youth with asthma believe that physical activity has become increasingly easier as they become older and that being active with asthma, despite its challenges, is a key part of their lives.
PubMed ID
22554059 View in PubMed
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The burden of seizures in Manitoba children: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180983
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Feb;31(1):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Asuri N Prasad
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Winnipeg, MB Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Feb;31(1):48-52
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Manitoba - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Seizures - drug therapy - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Population-based studies are necessary to better understand the risk factors for developing seizure disorders and the impact of these conditions on children. We undertook an assessment of the prevalence of seizure disorders in a population of children on the basis of health care utilization records.
Using Manitoba's population-based prescription and health care data for 1998/99, the prevalence of children with seizure disorders, on the basis of at least one physician visit or hospitalization for epilepsy or a prescription for an antiepileptic drug, was determined by age, urban/rural region and socioeconomic status. The latter was measured as neighbourhoods stratified by income quintiles according to Census data.
Age-specific prevalence rates for seizure disorders in Manitoba children, determined from health care administrative records, were similar to published data on the prevalence of epilepsy, with one exception. Prevalence rates in adolescents were higher than those reported in the literature. No statistically significant differences in prevalence rates were observed between urban and rural populations. However, a higher prevalence was found among children of all ages living in lower socioeconomic neighbourhoods in urban areas, which presented as a gradient of increased prevalence with decreased levels of income.
Population-based health care administrative data can be used to describe the geographical distribution of seizure disorders. Our data suggest that the burden of seizure disorders is not evenly distributed among children.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Feb;31(1):3-415038465
PubMed ID
15038470 View in PubMed
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Childhood wheezing syndromes and healthcare data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184729
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2003 Aug;36(2):131-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Cameron A Mustard
Allan B Becker
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. kozyrsk@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2003 Aug;36(2):131-6
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - therapy
Bronchitis - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Resources - utilization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Multivariate Analysis
Recurrence
Respiratory Sounds
Risk factors
Seasons
Single-Parent Family
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
There is convincing evidence that several distinct wheezing syndromes exist in childhood. The purpose of this research was to assess the potential of using healthcare utilization profiles to identify wheezing syndromes in children which are distinct from asthma. Using population-based healthcare administrative data, a cohort of children, aged 5-15 years, with bronchitis diagnoses from time of birth to 1995, but no physician diagnoses of asthma, was followed over the period January 1996-March 1998. In this follow-up period, 13% had subsequent healthcare utilization for asthma, 23% had continued healthcare utilization for bronchitis, and 64% had no further healthcare utilization. The likelihood of bronchitis vs. asthma outcomes was determined for a variety of asthma risk factors. In a cohort of 11,043 children with initial healthcare contact for bronchitis but not asthma, two potentially distinct entities of bronchitis emerged from our data: 1) transient bronchitis, similar to transient wheezing of early childhood, which was associated with winter-only healthcare utilization and absence of allergy, and 2) recurrent bronchitis which differed from asthma on the basis of winter-only healthcare utilization, prematurity at birth, absence of allergy, and low socioeconomic status. Healthcare administrative records can be used to describe the natural history of wheezing in children and to identify markers which may discriminate asthma from other syndromes.
PubMed ID
12833492 View in PubMed
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Community resources and determinants of the future health of Manitobans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186712
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S70-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Patricia Fergusson
Jennifer Bodnarchuk
Marni Brownell
Charles Burchill
Teresa Mayer
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB. Anita_Kozyrskyj@cpe.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S70-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Day Care Centers
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Educational Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics
Health Resources - supply & distribution
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Manitoba - epidemiology
Population Dynamics
Regional Health Planning
Residence Characteristics - classification
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Life history studies in health show that some of the key determinants of health inequalities lie in biological and social experiences at the earliest times of life. The objectives of this research were to describe the regional distribution of childhood determinants of adult health, such as school achievement, and the environments which contribute to their development.
Using Manitoba data from the National Population Health Survey, the National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, the Department of Education, Training and Youth, the Department of Family Services and Housing, the Library Association website and the Agriculture and Food website, the regional distribution of Grade 3 standards test scores and neighbourhood resources such as child care services, libraries, sports participation and food costs were determined for 12 Regional Health Authorities and 12 Winnipeg Community Areas, ranked by a measure of population healthiness, the premature mortality rate. Findings were also reported by income level and larger geographic regions.
Children living in neighbourhoods with less healthy populations were more likely to have poorer school performance, as indicated by Grade 3 math standards test scores. They were-also more likely to change schools, less likely to participate in sports, and had decreased access to affordable food and licenced day care. They had similar access to library books as children living in more healthy neighbourhoods, although book lending rates were not measured.
We documented regional variation in the availability of resources to support healthy childhood development.
Notes
Comment On: Can J Public Health. 2002 Nov-Dec;93 Suppl 2:S9-1412580384
PubMed ID
12580394 View in PubMed
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Decrease in antibiotic use among children in the 1990s: not all antibiotics, not all children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179157
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jul 20;171(2):133-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-20-2004
Author
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Anita G Carrie
Garey B Mazowita
Lisa M Lix
Terry P Klassen
Barbara J Law
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Manitoba Centre for Health Policy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg. kozyrsk@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2004 Jul 20;171(2):133-8
Date
Jul-20-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Humans
Income
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Manitoba
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Abstract
Decreases in antibiotic use were widely reported in the 1990s. This study was undertaken to determine trends in the use of antibiotics from fiscal year (FY) 1995 (April 1995 to March 1996) to FY 2001 in a complete population of Manitoba children.
Using Manitoba's health care databases, we determined annual population-based rates of antibiotic prescription among children by antibiotic class (narrow-spectrum and broader-spectrum antibiotics), age group, physician diagnosis (e.g., otitis media or bronchitis) and neighbourhood income in urban areas (derived from the 1996 census). Antibiotic prescription rates were generated within a generalized linear model framework with general estimating equations, and differences between FY 2001 and FY 1995 were tested. Differences in antibiotic use over time were compared across antibiotic classes, age groups, diagnoses and income neighbourhoods.
The overall antibiotic prescription rate decreased by almost one-third, from 1.2 prescriptions per child in FY 1995 to 0.9 prescriptions in FY 2001. Total antibiotic use declined for all respiratory tract infections; decreases were greatest for the sulfonamides (decrease to less than one-third the FY 1995 rate) and narrow-spectrum macrolides (decrease to less than half the FY 1995 rate). In contrast, the FY 2001 rate for broader-spectrum macrolides was as much as 12.5 times the FY 1995 rate. Otitis media accounted for one-quarter of the use of the latter agents. Preschool children and low-income children received the greatest number of antibiotic prescriptions. Declines in antibiotic prescriptions were of a lesser magnitude for low-income children (for whom rates in FY 2001 were four-fifths the rates in FY 1995) than for higher-income children (for whom rates in FY 2001 were about two-thirds the rates in FY 1995).
Overall, antibiotic use declined over the late 1990s in this population of Canadian children, but the increasing use of broader-spectrum macrolides and higher rates of antibiotic use among preschool and low-income children may have implications for antibiotic resistance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15262881 View in PubMed
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Depression is more common in girls with nonatopic asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135479
Source
Chest. 2011 Nov;140(5):1138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Salma Bahreinian
Geoff D C Ball
Ian Colman
Allan B Becker
Anita L Kozyrskyj
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. bahreini@ualberta.ca
Source
Chest. 2011 Nov;140(5):1138-45
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - complications - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Skin Tests
Abstract
Asthma may increase the risk of comorbid depressive disorders in children. Children suffering from asthma or depression are more often overweight. We examined whether depression was more likely in children with atopic and nonatopic asthma, independent of abdominal adiposity.
A cross-sectional analysis was performed on data collected in the Study of Asthma, Genes, and Environment in Canada. Children aged 11 to 14 years were assessed by a pediatric allergist to confirm asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis diagnosis. Atopic asthma was defined based on skin prick testing and allergic asthma based on the presence of allergic rhinitis or atopic dermatitis in addition to asthma. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Children's Depression Inventory-Short Form. Data were analyzed using logistic regression modeling to determine likelihood of depression in children with asthma, stratified by gender and adjusting for ethnicity, waist circumference (WC), and atopy.
Four hundred thirty-one children aged 11 to 14 years (136 with asthma and 295 without asthma) were studied. After adjusting for the covariates, girls who had nonatopic or nonallergic asthma were three times more likely to have comorbid depressive symptoms compared with healthy girls (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.00-8.10; OR, 3.47; 95% CI, 1.30-9.25, respectively). For each 10-cm increase in WC of girls, our model showed a 39% to 56% increase in the chance of depression. In boys, neither asthma nor WC showed an association with depression.
We recommend all health practitioners who see girls with asthma or girls who are overweight watch for depressive symptoms and treat comorbid depression seriously.
Notes
Comment In: Chest. 2011 Nov;140(5):1108-1022045872
PubMed ID
21474570 View in PubMed
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