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Dietary reference intakes: a comparison with the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187315
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002;63(4):176-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Angela L Fitzgerald
David R Maclean
Paul J Veugelers
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002;63(4):176-83
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements
Population Surveillance
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the newly released dietary reference intakes with the 1990 Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey and identify characteristics that influence compatibility with these new recommendations. For each of 17 nutrient recommendations, we calculated the proportion of participants who consumed intakes within the recommended range. We constructed a score reflecting overall compatibility between the new recommendations and the Nova Scotia Nutrition Survey data. Using this score as the dependent variable, we conducted multivariate regression analysis to evaluate the importance of demographic and behavioural factors for compatibility with the dietary reference intakes. Results indicate that compatibility with the dietary reference intakes was poor among Nova Scotians, particularly for magnesium, vitamins C and E, and macronutrients. Compatibility was lower among females than among males, and differed independently by age, body mass index, socioeconomic factors, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Dietary intervention is needed in Nova Scotia. Reduced fat intake and increased intake of specific vitamins should be promoted. We recommend that nutrition education campaigns coinciding with the introduction of the dietary reference intakes in Nova Scotia target younger people, those of lower socioeconomic background, smokers, and those who are obese.
PubMed ID
12493140 View in PubMed
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