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Technology in the lives of women who live with memory impairment as a result of a traumatic brain injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165562
Source
Assist Technol. 2006;18(2):170-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Abigail Dry
Angela Colantonio
Jill I Cameron
Alex Mihailidis
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Assist Technol. 2006;18(2):170-80
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Computers
Brain Injury, Chronic - complications - rehabilitation
Computers, Handheld
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Memory Disorders - etiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Ontario
Self-Help Devices
Abstract
A large number of individuals who have experienced a traumatic brain injury are women; unfortunately, there is a lack of literature focusing on their treatment preferences. Electronic memory aids have the potential to offer tremendous assistance to increase the independence of individuals with memory impairment; however, the use of electronic memory aids with this female population has not been explored. The objective of this study was to investigate the perceptions and use of electronic memory aids in women with memory impairment as a result of a traumatic brain injury to further their use of this technology to enable their independence. Two focus groups were conducted, each with five women who self-reported a moderate to severe head injury. The primary theme that emerged was the willingness and interest of this sample to use this technology when provided with an appropriate introduction and learning environment. The results reaffirm current literature supporting the use of electronic memory aids with a population with a head injury. Individuals not currently using this technology were motivated to employ electronic memory aids in their daily lives. Further research must be conducted to develop strategies to enable this population's use of electronic memory aids.
PubMed ID
17236476 View in PubMed
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