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[Accidental hypothermia in the elderly]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57258
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Mar 10;122(7):715-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2002
Author
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Author Affiliation
Mottagelsen Ullevål universitetssykehus 0407 Oslo. anettehylen.ranhoff@ulleval.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Mar 10;122(7):715-7
Date
Mar-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hypothermia - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Prognosis
Rewarming - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Accidental hypothermia is unintended body core temperature of 35 degrees C or below, a known hazard to elderly people in temperate and cold climates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We present two old patients with severe hypothermia and a review of the literature focusing on risk factors, clinical presentation, and the treatment of hypothermia in the elderly. RESULTS: Two patients, aged 90 and 102 years, with body core temperature
PubMed ID
11998737 View in PubMed
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Cognitive impairment influences the risk of reoperation after hip fracture surgery: results of 87,573 operations reported to the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307332
Source
Acta Orthop. 2020 04; 91(2):146-151
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
04-2020
Author
Målfrid Holen Kristoffersen
Eva Dybvik
Ole Martin Steihaug
Torbjørn Berge Kristensen
Lars Birger Engesaeter
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Jan-Erik Gjertsen
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Hip Fracture Register, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen.
Source
Acta Orthop. 2020 04; 91(2):146-151
Date
04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cognitive Dysfunction - complications - epidemiology
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Hemiarthroplasty - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - psychology - surgery
Hip Prosthesis - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Periprosthetic Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - surgery
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis-Related Infections - epidemiology - surgery
Registries
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
Background and purpose - About one-fourth of hip fracture patients have cognitive impairment. We investigated whether patients' cognitive function affects surgical treatment, risk of reoperation, and mortality after hip fracture, based on data in the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register (NHFR).Patients and methods - This prospective cohort study included 87,573 hip fractures reported to the NHFR in 2005-2017. Hazard rate ratios (HRRs) for risk of reoperation and mortality were calculated using Cox regression adjusted for sex, age, ASA class, fracture type, and surgical method.Results - Cognitive impairment was reported in 27% of patients. They were older (86 vs. 82 years) and had higher ASA class than non-impaired patients. There were no differences in fracture type or operation methods. Cognitively impaired patients had a lower overall reoperation rate (4.7% vs. 8.9%, HRR 0.71; 95% CI 0.66-0.76) and lower risk of reoperation after osteosynthesis (HRR 0.58; CI 0.53-0.63) than non-impaired patients. Cognitively impaired hip fracture patients had an increased reoperation risk after hemiarthroplasty (HRR 1.2; CI 1.1-1.4), mainly due to dislocations (1.5% vs. 1.0%, HRR 1.7; CI 1.3-2.1). Risk of dislocation was particularly high following the posterior approach (4.7% vs. 2.8%, HRR 1.8; CI 1.2-2.7). Further, they had a higher risk of reoperation due to periprosthetic fracture after uncemented hemiarthroplasty (HRR 1.6; CI 1.0-2.6). Cognitively impaired hip fracture patients had higher 1-year mortality than those without cognitive impairment (38% vs. 16%, HRR 2.1; CI 2.1-2.2).Interpretation - Our findings support giving cognitively impaired patients the same surgical treatment as non-impaired patients. But since the risk of hemiprosthesis dislocation and periprosthetic fracture was higher in cognitively impaired patients, they should probably not have posterior approach surgery or uncemented implants.
PubMed ID
31928100 View in PubMed
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Disability in instrumental activities of daily living in elderly patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108358
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(3-4):146-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karin Hesseberg
Hege Bentzen
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Knut Engedal
Astrid Bergland
Author Affiliation
Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2013;36(3-4):146-53
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - psychology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mild Cognitive Impairment - diagnosis - psychology
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway
Registries
Sex Characteristics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The aim is to examine disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) in elderly persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), further to identify items of IADL which separate the two conditions and to explore potential gender differences.
A cross-sectional study of 729 patients aged =65 years recruited from outpatient memory clinics. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used in the main analysis to explore the association between IADL and diagnosis.
We found an association between IADL and diagnosis, and a difference in the proportion of disability in IADL in patients with MCI and AD, i.e. 66 and 88%, respectively. Six of the 8 items revealed differences in the proportions of patients with IADL disability among MCI and AD. No substantial gender differences were found, except for laundry.
PubMed ID
23900051 View in PubMed
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The effect of coping on the burden in family carers of persons with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114483
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):973-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Frøydis Kristine Bruvik
Ingun Dina Ulstein
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Knut Engedal
Author Affiliation
a Norwegian Centre for Dementia Research , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(8):973-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - nursing - physiopathology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study explores the association between coping, measured by the extent of locus of control, and the burden of care on family carers of persons with dementia (PWD).
Two hundred thirty PWD living at home and their family carers were recruited from 20 Norwegian municipalities. The carers' burden was assessed by the Relatives' Stress Scale (RSS) and coping by the Locus of Control Behaviour Scale. The PWD were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI-Q), the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) scale, and the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE).
Locus of control (LoC) was found to be the most important factor associated with the burden on carers of PWD, even when we had controlled for the PWD variables, such as the NPI-Q score. The LoC and the carer's use of hours per day to assist the PWD were the only two variables the carers found that affected the extent of the burden. The NPI-Q was the most important variable in the PWD that affected the burden on the carers.
Carers who believe that what happens to them is the consequence of their own actions are likely to be less burdened than carers not expecting to have control. This finding gives a possibility to identify carers with a high risk of burden.
PubMed ID
23614391 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life in older patients with acute coronary syndrome randomised to an invasive or conservative strategy. The After Eighty randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294203
Source
Age Ageing. 2018 Jan 01; 47(1):42-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-01-2018
Author
Nicolai Tegn
Michael Abdelnoor
Lars Aaberge
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Knut Endresen
Erik Gjertsen
Rita Skårdal
Lars Gullestad
Bjørn Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Age Ageing. 2018 Jan 01; 47(1):42-47
Date
Jan-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Age Factors
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Conservative Treatment - adverse effects
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Non-ST Elevated Myocardial Infarction - diagnostic imaging - psychology - therapy
Norway
Percutaneous Coronary Intervention - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
in the After Eighty study (ClinicalTrials.gov.number, NCT01255540), patients aged 80 years or more, with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI), and unstable angina pectoris (UAP), were randomised to either an invasive or conservative management approach. We sought to compare the effects of these management strategies on health related quality of life (HRQOL) after 1 year.
the After Eighty study was a prospective randomised controlled multicenter trial. In total, 457 patients aged 80 or over, with NSTEMI or UAP, were randomised to either an invasive strategy (n = 229, mean age: 84.7 years), involving early coronary angiography, with immediate evaluation for percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass graft, optimal medical therapy, or to a conservative strategy (n = 228, mean age: 84.9 years). The Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36) was used to assess HRQOL at baseline, and at the 1-year follow-up.
baseline SF-36 completion was achieved for 208 and 216 patients in the invasive and conservative groups, respectively. A total of 137 in the invasive group and 136 patients in the conservative group completed the SF-36 form at follow-up. When comparing the changes from follow-up to baseline (delta) no significant changes in quality-of-life scores were observed between the two strategies in any of the domains, expect for a small but statistically significant difference in bodily pain. This difference in only one of the SF-36 subscales may not necessarily be clinically significant.
from baseline to the 1 year follow-up, only minor differences in change of HRQOL as measured by SF-36 were seen by comparing an invasive and conservative strategy.
NCT01255540.
PubMed ID
28985265 View in PubMed
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Inappropriate prescribing for older people admitted to an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122297
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Sep;30(3):169-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Marit Stordal Bakken
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Anders Engeland
Sabine Ruths
Author Affiliation
Kavli Research Centre for Ageing and Dementia, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Marit.Bakken@isf.uib.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Sep;30(3):169-75
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Geriatric Nursing
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To identify inappropriate prescribing among older patients on admission to and discharge from an intermediate-care nursing home unit and hospital wards, and to compare changes during stay within and between these groups.
Observational study.
Altogether 400 community-dwelling people aged = 70 years, on consecutive emergency admittance to hospital wards of internal medicine and orthopaedic surgery, were randomized to an intermediate-care nursing home unit or hospital wards; 290 (157 at the intermediate-care nursing home unit and 133 in hospital wards) were eligible for this sub-study.
Prevalence on admission and discharge of potentially inappropriate medications (Norwegian general practice [NORGEP] criteria) and drug-drug interactions; changes during stay.
The mean (SD) age was 84.7 (6.2) years; 71% were women. From admission to discharge, the mean numbers of drugs prescribed per person increased from 6.0 (3.3) to 9.3 (3.8), p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22830533 View in PubMed
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Increased risk of hip fracture among older people using antidepressant drugs: data from the Norwegian Prescription Database and the Norwegian Hip Fracture Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116049
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Jul;42(4):514-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Marit Stordal Bakken
Anders Engeland
Lars B Engesæter
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Steinar Hunskaar
Sabine Ruths
Author Affiliation
Kavli Research Centre for Ageing and Dementia, Haraldsplass Deaconess Hospital, Bergen, Norway. marit.bakken@isf.uib.no
Source
Age Ageing. 2013 Jul;42(4):514-20
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Antidepressive Agents, Tricyclic - adverse effects
Drug Prescriptions
Female
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
hip fractures are usually caused by a combination of reduced bone mineral density and falls; using antidepressant drugs may affect both of these.
we aimed to examine associations between exposure to antidepressant drugs and the risk of hip fracture among older people, and, provided associations found, to estimate the attributable risk of hip fracture.
we conducted a nationwide prospective cohort study of the 906,422 people in Norway born before 1945.
information on all prescriptions of antidepressants dispensed in 2004-10 and all primary hip fractures in 2005-10 was obtained from the Norwegian Prescription Database, and the Norwegian Hip Fracture Registry, respectively. The incidence rates of hip fracture during the time people were exposed and unexposed to antidepressant drugs were compared by calculating the standardised incidence ratio (SIR).
altogether 39,938 people (4.4%) experienced a primary hip fracture. The risk of hip fracture was increased for people exposed to any antidepressant [SIR = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-1.8]; tricyclic antidepressants (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI: 1.3-1.5); selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (SIR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.7-1.8) and other antidepressants (SIR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.5-1.7). The risk of hip fracture attributable to exposure to antidepressant drugs was 4.7%.
this study indicated an increased risk of hip fracture among people exposed to antidepressants, especially those with serotonergic properties such as SSRIs. This association needs to be explored further in clinical studies.
PubMed ID
23438446 View in PubMed
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The last three days of life: a comparison of pain management in the young old and the oldest old hospitalised patients using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277108
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2015 Dec;10(4):263-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Simen Alexander Steindal
Inger Schou Bredal
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Liv Wergeland Sørbye
Anners Lerdal
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2015 Dec;10(4):263-72
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Geriatric Nursing
Humans
Male
Norway
Nursing Assessment
Pain Management - methods
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care - methods
Retrospective Studies
Terminal Care - methods
Abstract
Pain is a common symptom in older patients at the end of life. Little research has evaluated pain management among the oldest hospitalised dying patients.
To compare the pain characteristics documented by healthcare workers for the young old and the oldest old hospitalised patients and the types of analgesics administered in the last three days of life.
A retrospective cross-sectional comparative study.
The study included 190 patients from a Norwegian general hospital: 101 young old patients (aged 65-84 years) and 89 oldest old patients (aged 85-100 years). Data were extracted from electronic patient records (EPRs) using the Resident Assessment Instrument for Palliative Care.
No significant differences were found between the young old and the oldest old patients with regard to pain characteristics. Pain intensity was poorly recorded in the EPRs. Most of the patients received adequate pain control. Morphine was the most frequently administered analgesic for dying patients. Compared to the oldest old patients, a greater proportion of the young old patients received paracetamol combined with codeine (OR = 3.25, 95% CI 1.02-10.40).
There appeared to be no differences in healthcare workers' documentation of pain characteristics in young old and oldest old patients, but young old patients were more likely to receive paracetamol in combination with codeine.
A limitation of the study is the retrospective design and that data were collected from a single hospital. Therefore, caution should be taken for interpretation of the results. The use of systematic patient-reported assessments in combination with feasible validated tools could contribute to more comprehensive documentation of pain intensity and improved pain control.
PubMed ID
25418556 View in PubMed
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Lower bone mineral density in older female endurance skiers - a cross-sectional, observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296159
Source
Eur Rev Aging Phys Act. 2018; 15:12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Anne K Gulsvik
Marius Myrstad
Ida Wilson Landgraff
Nina Emaus
Anette Hylen Ranhoff
Author Affiliation
1Department of Internal medicine, Diakonhjemmet hospital, Pb 23 Vinderen, 0319 Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur Rev Aging Phys Act. 2018; 15:12
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Physical activity (PA) is generally beneficial for bone health, but the effect of high levels of PA over many years, in older women, is unknown.
T-score from Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and self-reported baseline characteristics were recorded for 24 female, cross-country-skiing-competitors, aged 68-76?years, from the Birkebeiner Ageing Study. Data from 647 women in the same age range from the Tromso-6 population study, with recorded DXA findings, were used for comparison.
The athletes reported a median(range) of 9(1-34) participations in the 54?km, yearly ski-race, indicating long-term PA. They also reported more moderate and high levels of PA than women in the general population (52% vs. 12 and 30% vs. 0%, respectively). The athletes had lower body mass index (BMI) than the controls (mean BMI 21.7 vs 26.9?kg/m2, p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
30473734 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.