Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

16 records – page 1 of 2.

Understanding the inverse care law: a register and survey-based study of patient deprivation and burnout in general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268424
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13:121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Peter Vedsted
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2014;13:121
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - etiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
General Practitioners - psychology - supply & distribution
Health Services Accessibility - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
According to the inverse care law, there is a mismatch between patients' medical needs and medical care supply. As an example, the number of doctors is often lower in areas with high deprivation compared to areas with no deprivation, and doctors with a deprived patient population may experience a high work pressure, have insufficient time for comprehensive tasks and be at higher risk for developing burnout. The mechanisms responsible for the inverse care law might be mutually reinforcing, but we know very little about this process. In this study, the association between patient deprivation and burnout in the general practitioners (GPs) was examined.
Active GPs in the Central Denmark Region were invited to participate in a survey on job satisfaction and burnout and 601 GPs returned the questionnaire (72%). The Danish Regions provided information about which persons were registered with each practice, and information concerning socioeconomic characteristics for each patient on the list was obtained from Statistics Denmark. A composite deprivation index was also used.
There was significantly more burnout among GPs in the highest quartile of the deprivation index compared to GPs in the lowest quartile (OR: 1.91; 95% CI: 1.06-3.44; p-value: 0.032). Among the eight variables included in the deprivation index, a high share of patients on social benefits was most strongly associated with burnout (OR: 2.62; 95% CI: 1.45-4.71; p-value: 0.001).
A higher propensity of GP burnout was found among GPs with a high share of deprived patients on their lists compared to GPs with a low share of deprived patients. This applied in particular to patients on social benefits. This indicates that beside lower supply of GPs in deprived areas, people in these areas may also be served by GPs who are in higher risk of burnout and not performing optimally.
Notes
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Dec 5;156(49):7372-67801401
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1997 Sep;47(422):547-529406487
Cites: Health Care Manage Rev. 2007 Jul-Sep;32(3):203-1217666991
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2007 Nov-Dec;5(6):503-1018025487
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2008 Jan;58(546):15-918186991
Cites: Fam Pract. 2008 Aug;25(4):245-6518622012
Cites: Med Educ. 2010 Mar;44(3):236-4720444054
Cites: Ann Surg. 2010 Jun;251(6):995-100019934755
Cites: Swiss Med Wkly. 2010;140:w1307020809437
Cites: JAMA. 2010 Sep 15;304(11):1173-8020841530
Cites: Acad Med. 2010 Oct;85(10 Suppl):S33-620881699
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jan;61(582):e12-2121401985
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:24021501467
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jul;61(588):e404-1021722448
Cites: Acad Med. 2011 Oct;86(10):1304-1021869661
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 Aug;90(8):1197-20110936995
Cites: Annu Rev Psychol. 2001;52:397-42211148311
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2001 Jun;51(467):456-6011407050
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Oct 6;323(7316):784-711588082
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Mar 5;136(5):358-6711874308
Cites: J Public Health Med. 2002 Mar;24(1):43-811939382
Cites: Lancet. 1971 Feb 27;1(7696):405-124100731
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1587-926439333
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Oct 7;299(6704):886-92510878
Cites: BMJ. 1991 Feb 16;302(6773):393-62004146
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1992 May;42(358):181-51389427
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2012 Jul;62(600):346-722781970
Cites: Maturitas. 2012 Dec;73(4):295-923007006
Cites: Int J Equity Health. 2013;12:6723962150
Cites: BMJ. 2014;348:g368824899639
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jul 20;360(9328):252-412133675
PubMed ID
25495229 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Stress and burnout increase among general practitioners in Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274758
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jan 20;176(2):135-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2014
Author
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Christina Maar Andersen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jan 20;176(2):135-8
Date
Jan-20-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - etiology - psychology - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
General Practitioners - psychology
Humans
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Burnout is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment. In agreement with international studies, Danish figures have revealed an increase in prevalence of severe burnout from 2.8% in 2004 to 5.3% in 2012. There is only little research on the consequences for the burned-out general practitioner (GP) and his patients as well as on appropriate intervention strategies. Even though burnout appears to be caused by a combination of personality factors and environmental conditions, the literature has one-sidedly focused on the resilience of the individual GP.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jan 20;176(2):13024629676
PubMed ID
24629678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-assessed health, perceived stress and non-participation in breast cancer screening: A Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275021
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:392-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Line Flytkjær Jensen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Berit Andersen
Peter Vedsted
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:392-8
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology - utilization
Female
Health status
Humans
Mammography - psychology - utilization
Mass Screening
Mental health
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
Population-based cancer screening is offered in many countries to detect early stages of cancer and reduce mortality. Screening efficiency and equality is susceptible due to a group of non-participants. We investigated associations between self-assessed health, perceived stress and subsequent non-participation in breast cancer screening.
This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who were also the target group (aged 50-69 years) for the first organised breast cancer screening programme -3 years later in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-2009.
A U-shaped association was observed for physical health assessment as women with the highest (PR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.06-1.55), and the lowest (PR=1.41, 95% CI: 1.18-1.68) physical health scores were less likely to participate in the programme than women with physical health scores in the middle range. Women with low mental health assessment were more likely not to participate than women with mental health scores in the middle range (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.22-1.69). Higher non-participation propensity was also observed for women with the highest perceived stress scores (PR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.07-1.51) compared with women scoring in the middle range.
Women with highest and lowest self-assessed physical health, with lowest mental health or highest perceived stress were significantly more likely not to participate in breast cancer screening 2-3 years later than women who reported average health. Interventions targeting these groups may promote equal participation in future breast cancer screening programmes.
PubMed ID
26494608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to healthcare seeking, beliefs about cancer and the role of socio-economic position. A Danish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269893
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Feb;71:107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Line Hvidberg
Christian Nielsen Wulff
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Peter Vedsted
Source
Prev Med. 2015 Feb;71:107-13
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Culture
Denmark
Fear
Female
General practitioners
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Cancer-related health behaviours may be affected by barriers to healthcare seeking and beliefs about cancer. The aim was to assess anticipated barriers to healthcare seeking and beliefs about cancer in a sample of the Danish population and to assess the association with socio-economic position.
A population-based telephone interview with 3000 randomly sampled persons aged 30 years or older was performed using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure from 31 May to 4 July 2011. The Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure includes statements about four anticipated barriers to healthcare seeking and three positively and three negatively framed beliefs about cancer. For all persons, register-based information on socio-economic position was obtained through Statistics Denmark.
Two anticipated barriers, worry about what the doctor might find and worry about wasting the doctor's time, were present among 27% and 15% of the respondents, respectively. Overall, a high proportion of respondents concurred with positive beliefs about cancer; fewer concurred with negative beliefs. Having a low educational level and a low household income were strongly associated with having negative beliefs about cancer.
The fact that worry about what the doctor might find and worry about wasting the doctor's time were commonly reported barriers call for initiatives in general practice. The association between low educational level and low household income and negative beliefs about cancer might to some degree explain the negative socio-economic gradient in cancer outcome.
PubMed ID
25524610 View in PubMed
Less detail

Social support and non-participation in breast cancer screening: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288357
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2016 Jun;38(2):335-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Line Flytkjær Jensen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Berit Andersen
Peter Vedsted
Source
J Public Health (Oxf). 2016 Jun;38(2):335-42
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Mammography
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Compliance - psychology
Social Environment
Social Support
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Social support may have an impact on screening participation. We studied the association between social support in 2006, defined as frequencies of contacts, instrumental support and emotional support and participation in breast cancer screening in 2008-09.
This population-based cohort study included 4512 women who had participated in a Health Survey in 2006 and who also were in the target group for the first round of organized breast cancer screening in the Central Denmark region in 2008-09.
Women with infrequent contacts with friends and family in 2006 were more likely not to participate in screening in 2008-09 [prevalence ratio (PR) 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.26-2.26, P-value
PubMed ID
25922368 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer awareness and socio-economic position: results from a population-based study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262152
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:581
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Line Hvidberg
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Christian Nielsen Wulff
Peter Vedsted
Source
BMC Cancer. 2014;14:581
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Differences in cancer awareness between individuals may explain variations in healthcare seeking behaviour and ultimately also variations in cancer survival. It is therefore important to examine cancer awareness and to investigate possible differences in cancer awareness among specific population subgroups. The aim of this study is to assess awareness of cancer symptoms, risk factors and perceived 5-year survival from bowel, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer in a Danish population sample and to analyse the association between these factors and socio-economic position indicators.
A population-based telephone survey was carried out among 1,000 respondents aged 30-49 years and 2,000 respondents aged 50 years and older using the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer measure. Information on socio-economic position was obtained by data linkage through Statistics Denmark. Prevalence ratios were used to determine the association between socio-economic position and cancer awareness.
A strong socio-economic gradient in cancer awareness was found. People with a low educational level and a low household income were more likely to have a lower awareness of cancer symptoms, cancer risk factors and the growing risk of cancer with age. Furthermore, men and people outside the labour force tended to be less aware of these factors than women and people within the labour force. However, women were more likely than men to lack awareness of the relationship between age and cancer risk. No clear associations were found between socio-economic position and lack of awareness of 5-year survival from bowel, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers.
As cancer awareness has shown to be positively associated with cancer-related behaviour, e.g. healthcare seeking, consideration must be given to tackle inequalities in cancer awareness and to address this issue in future public health strategies, which should be targeted at and tailored to the intended recipient groups.
Notes
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2012 Mar 27;106(7):1262-722415239
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2011;11:28422027084
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2013 Feb 1;132(3):676-8522623157
Cites: Health Policy. 2013 Sep;112(1-2):148-5523693117
Cites: Br J Health Psychol. 2014 Feb;19(1):36-5123379417
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2004 Apr 5;90(7):1367-7315054456
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 2008;32(1):45-5118406067
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2008 Sep;44(14):2074-8518674895
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2008 Nov;17(9):1477-9818954237
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Feb;74(2):221-719059747
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2009;24(1):58-6419259867
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1999;(25):15-2010854451
Cites: Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):417-2811006068
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Jan;12(1):33-711227923
Cites: Public Health. 2001 Jan;115(1):54-6111402353
Cites: Public Health. 2001 May;115(3):173-411429711
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2002 Mar;7(1):19-4011928888
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 May;36(5):525-3512689797
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2003 Oct 20;3:2114567763
Cites: Br J Psychol. 2004 May;95(Pt 2):219-3415142303
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Sep 28;313(7060):799-8028842078
Cites: Prev Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;26(2):170-79085385
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1997 Nov;44(5):535-99408738
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 1998 Sep;35(1):35-429832895
Cites: Women Health. 1999;28(4):93-11210378347
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Nov;52(11):1111-610527006
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Sep 3-9;366(9488):825-3116139657
Cites: J Health Commun. 2006;11 Suppl 1:1-1716641071
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S1-419956152
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2006 Nov;53(4):441-917150149
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S18-2319956158
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S24-3019956159
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S92-S10119956172
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2010 Mar;46(4):765-8120116997
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2010 Jun;49(5):713-2420491527
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Sep;19(9):2272-720660602
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2010 Nov;38(7):699-70620851845
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jan 8;377(9760):127-3821183212
Cites: J Public Health Dent. 2009 Winter;69(1):34-4018662249
Cites: Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2011 Feb;15(1):31-720584627
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2011;33:135-4721586673
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2012 May;21(5):835-4222434535
PubMed ID
25108301 View in PubMed
Less detail

Identifying specific non-attending groups in breast cancer screening--population-based registry study of participation and socio-demography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118988
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:518
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Line Flytkjær Jensen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Berit Andersen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
The Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, Aarhus C 8000, Denmark. line.jensen@alm.au.dk
Source
BMC Cancer. 2012;12:518
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Early Detection of Cancer - methods - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A population-based breast cancer screening programme was implemented in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-09. The objective of this registry-based study was to examine the association between socio-demographic characteristics and screening participation and to examine whether the group of non-participants can be regarded as a homogeneous group of women.
Participation status was obtained from a regional database for all women invited to the first screening round in the Central Denmark Region in 2008-2009 (n=149,234). Participation data was linked to registries containing socio-demographic information. Distance to screening site was calculated using ArcGIS. Participation was divided into 'participants' and 'non-participants', and non-participants were further stratified into 'active non-participants' and 'passive non-participants' based on whether the woman called and cancelled her participation or was a 'no-show'.
The screening participation rate was 78.9%. In multivariate analyses, non-participation was associated with older age, immigrant status, low OECD-adjusted household income, high and low level education compared with middle level education, unemployment, being unmarried, distance to screening site >20 km, being a tenant and no access to a vehicle. Active and passive non-participants comprised two distinct groups with different socio-demographic characteristics, with passive non-participants being more socially deprived compared with active non-participants.
Non-participation was associated with low social status e.g. low income, unemployment, no access to vehicle and status as tenant. Non-participants were also more likely than participants to be older, single, and of non-Danish origin. Compared to active non-participants, passive non-participants were characterized by e.g. lower income and lower educational level. Different interventions might be warranted to increase participation in the two non-participant groups.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Mar 16;359(9310):909-1911918907
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Feb;13(1):73-8211899121
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Sep 3;137(5 Part 1):347-6012204020
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2003 Dec;12(6):487-9414639126
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2004 Feb 20;108(5):754-6014696103
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Apr 1;159(7):702-615033648
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2003 Oct 20;3:2114567763
Cites: Breast. 2004 Aug;13(4):284-915325662
Cites: J Med Screen. 1999;6(2):82-810444726
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2005 Jan 20;113(3):464-7015455383
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2006 Jun;15(3):242-816679867
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15;122(2):418-2317893881
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(2):260-7518022299
Cites: Cancer. 2009 Oct 15;115(20):4828-3819645031
Cites: Health Educ Behav. 2009 Dec;36(6):1012-2519233947
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2009 Oct;20(8):1339-5319449107
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010;10:14620302614
Cites: Int J Public Health. 2010 Jun;55(3):209-1520340039
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jan 8;377(9760):127-3821183212
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2011 Jun;58(6):C428721651881
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2011 Jul;33(1):135-4721586673
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2011 Aug;21(4):512-920656691
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):42-521775350
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2000 Feb;9(1):25-3310777007
Cites: Prev Med. 2000 Oct;31(4):417-2811006068
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 6;164(3):329-3411232132
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Oct 20;358(9290):1340-211684218
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2001 Nov;70(2):145-5311768605
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Jan;50(1):62-812028248
PubMed ID
23151053 View in PubMed
Less detail

Coping strategies and patient delay in patients with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115385
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2013;31(2):204-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Frede Olesen
Rikke Pilegaard Hansen
Robert Zachariae
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
Research Unit for General Practice and Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. AFP@alm.au.dk
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2013;31(2):204-18
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aged
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
This study examined associations between avoidance and approach coping and patient delay in cancer patients (N = 1024). Approach coping was associated with short appraisal intervals (time from symptom discovery to recognition of symptom seriousness). Avoidance coping was associated with long appraisal intervals when adjusting for covariates. Help-seeking intervals (time from recognition of symptom seriousness to contact to general practitioner) were only associated with approach coping and only when adjusting for the influence of covariates. The results revealed a complex relationship between coping and patient delay and supported that normal processing of health threats implies avoidance and approach coping strategies.
PubMed ID
23514255 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measurement properties of the Danish version of the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer (ABC) measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290244
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2017 Apr 26; 17(1):74
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-26-2017
Author
Line Hvidberg
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Christian Nielsen Wulff
Anders Helles Carlsen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care (CaP), Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. LINE.HVIDBERG@PH.AU.DK.
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2017 Apr 26; 17(1):74
Date
Apr-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership aims to study international differences in cancer survival and the possible causes. Participating countries are Australia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK and a particular focus area is differences in awareness and beliefs about cancer. In this connection, the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer (ABC) measure has been translated into multiple languages. The aim of this study is to appraise the translation process and measurement properties of the Danish version of the ABC measure.
The translation process included forward and backward translations and a pilot-test. Data quality was assessed using survey data from 3000 Danish respondents and content validity indexes were calculated based on judgments from ten academic researchers. Construct validity was determined by a confirmative factor analysis (CFA) and exploratory factor analyses (EFA) using survey data and a known group comparison analysis including 56 persons. Test-retest reliability was assessed based on responses from 123 person whom completed the interview twice with an interval of 2-3 weeks.
The translation process resulted in a Danish ABC measure conceptually equivalent to the English ABC measure. Data quality was acceptable in relation to non-response to individual items which was maximum 0.3%, but the percentage of respondents answering 'don't know' was above 3% for 16 out of 48 items. Content validity indexes showed that items adequately reflected and represented the constructs to be measured (item content validity indexes: 0.9-1.0; construct content validity indexes: 0.8-1.0). The hypothesised factor structure could not be replicated by a CFA, but EFA on each individual subscale showed that six out of seven subscales were unidimensional. The ABC measure discriminated well between non-medical academics and medical academics, but had some difficulties in discriminating between educational groups. Test-retest reliability was moderate to substantial for most items.
The Danish ABC measure is a useful measurement that is accepted and understood by the target group and with accepted measurement criteria for content validity and test-retest reliability. Future studies may further explore the factorial structure of the ABC measure and should focus on improving the response categories.
Notes
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2011 Aug 23;11:366 PMID 21859500
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2007 Aug;30(4):459-67 PMID 17654487
Cites: J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care. 2012 Jul;38(3):167-74 PMID 21933805
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-42 PMID 17161752
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(5):827-36 PMID 19054666
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 May;36(5):525-35 PMID 12689797
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S18-23 PMID 19956158
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2014 Aug 09;14:581 PMID 25108301
Cites: Br J Psychol. 2004 May;95(Pt 2):219-34 PMID 15142303
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S13-7 PMID 19956157
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Feb;71:107-13 PMID 25524610
Cites: Ann Oncol. 2003;14 Suppl 5:v128-49 PMID 14684503
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2007 Sep;8(9):773-83 PMID 17714991
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2010 May;46(8):1374-81 PMID 20335018
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1979 Mar;86(2):420-8 PMID 18839484
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jan 8;377(9760):127-38 PMID 21183212
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74 PMID 843571
Cites: Nurs Res. 1986 Nov-Dec;35(6):382-5 PMID 3640358
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Dec 18;2(6):null PMID 23253874
Cites: Thorax. 2012 May;67(5):426-32 PMID 22426791
PubMed ID
28446140 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric morbidity and non-participation in breast cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277030
Source
Breast. 2016 Feb;25:38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Line Flytkjær Jensen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Bodil Hammer Bech
Berit Andersen
Peter Vedsted
Source
Breast. 2016 Feb;25:38-44
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer - methods - psychology
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - psychology
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - psychology
Registries
Abstract
Organised breast cancer screening is currently one of the best strategies for early-stage breast cancer detection. However, early detection has proven challenging for women with psychiatric disease. This study aims to investigate psychiatric morbidity and non-participation in breast cancer screening.
We conducted an observational cohort study including women invited to the first organised screening round in the Central Denmark Region. Data on psychiatric diagnosis, psychoactive prescription medicine and consultation with private psychiatrists were obtained from Danish registries and assessed for a period of up to 10 years before the screening date.
The cohort comprised 144,264 women whereof 33.0% were registered with an indication of psychiatric morbidity. We found elevated non-participation propensity among women with a psychiatric diagnosis especially for women with schizophrenia and substance abuse. Also milder psychiatric morbidity was associated with higher non-participation likelihood as women who had redeemed psychoactive prescription medicine or have had minimum one consultation with a private psychiatrist were more likely not to participate. Finally, we found that the chronicity of psychiatric morbidity was associated with non-participation and that woman who had a psychiatric morbidity defined as 'persistent' had higher likelihood of non-participation than women with recently active morbidity or inactive psychiatric morbidity.
This study showed a strong association between psychiatric morbidity and an increased likelihood of non-participation in breast cancer screening in a health care system with universal and tax-funded health services. This knowledge may inform interventions targeting women with psychiatric morbidity as they have poorer breast cancer prognosis.
PubMed ID
26585065 View in PubMed
Less detail

16 records – page 1 of 2.