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Concentration dataset for 4 essential and 5 non-essential elements in fish collected in Arctic and sub-Arctic territories of the Nenets Autonomous and Arkhangelsk regions of Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308189
Source
Data Brief. 2019 Dec; 27:104631
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-2019
Author
Nikita Sobolev
Evert Nieboer
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Valery Chashchin
Dag G Ellingsen
Yulia Varakina
Elena Plakhina
Dmitry Kotsur
Anna Kosheleva
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M. V. Lomonosov, Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Severnaya Dvina Emb. 17, 163002, Arkhangelsk, Russia.
Source
Data Brief. 2019 Dec; 27:104631
Date
Dec-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The raw concentration data for the research article entitled "Essential and non-essential trace elements in fish consumed by indigenous peoples of the European Russian Arctic" (Sobolev et al., 2019) [1] are herein presented. Fifteen fish species were collected in the Nenets Autonomous and Arkhangelsk Regions of the Russian Federation and were analysed for 9 elements (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se and Zn). The sampling sites were located in the European parts of the Russian Arctic and sub-Arctic territories. Within these territories, Nenets indigenous peoples commonly catch and consume local fish. Based on questionnaire data, local fish sources constituted ~ 90% of the total fish consumed by endemic individuals living in these regions. The data summarized in this publication fill a gap in knowledge.
PubMed ID
31720319 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of Persistent Organic Pollutants in Women's Serum in the European Arctic Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303759
Source
Toxics. 2021 Jan 07; 9(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-07-2021
Author
Yulia Varakina
Dmitry Lahmanov
Andrey Aksenov
Anna Trofimova
Rimma Korobitsyna
Natalia Belova
Nikita Sobolev
Dmitry Kotsur
Tatiana Sorokina
Andrej M Grjibovski
Valery Chashchin
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Northern (Arctic) Federal University Named after M. V. Lomonosov, Naberezhnaya Severnoy Dvini 17, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia.
Source
Toxics. 2021 Jan 07; 9(1):
Date
Jan-07-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are heterogeneous carbon-based compounds that can seriously affect human health. The aim of this study was to measure serum concentrations of POPs in women residing in the Euro-Arctic Region of Russia. A total of 204 women from seven rural settlements of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO) took part in the study. We measured serum concentrations of 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 17 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) across the study sites and among Nenets and non-Nenets residents. Measurement of POPs was performed using an Agilent 7890A gas chromatograph equipped with an Agilent 7000 series MS/MS triple quadrupole system. The concentrations of all POPs were low and similar to findings from other Arctic countries. However, significant geographic differences between the settlements were observed with exceptionally high concentrations of PCBs in Varnek located on Vaygach Island. Both SDDT (p = 0.011) and SPCB (p = 0.038) concentrations were significantly lower in Nenets. Our main findings suggest that the serum concentrations of the legacy POPs in women in the Euro-Arctic Region of Russia are low and similar to those in other Arctic countries. Significant variations between settlements, and between Nenets and non-Nenets residents, were found. Arctic biomonitoring research in Russia should include studies on the associations between nutrition and concentrations of POPs.
PubMed ID
33430444 View in PubMed
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Essential and non-essential elements in biological samples of inhabitants residing in Nenets Autonomous Okrug of the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311103
Source
Environ Int. 2021 Mar 21; 152:106510
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-21-2021
Author
Nikita Sobolev
Dag G Ellingsen
Natalia Belova
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Anna Trofimova
Yulia Varakina
Dmitriy Kotsur
Andrej M Grjibovski
Valerii Chashchin
Konstantin Bogolitsyn
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Northern (Arctic) Federal University Named After M. V. Lomonosov, Naberezhnaya Severnoy Dvini 17, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia. Electronic address: n.a.sobolev@outlook.com.
Source
Environ Int. 2021 Mar 21; 152:106510
Date
Mar-21-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Exposure of Arctic residents to environmental pollutants is an emerging public health problem receiving little global attention. The objective of this study was to assess whole blood concentrations of nine selected essential (Co, Cu, Mn, Se, Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb) elements among Nenets and non-Nenets adult residents of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO) living in seven coastal and inland settlements. Urine was collected in two settlements for assessment of iodine status. Altogether 297 whole blood and 68 urine samples were analysed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and the accuracy of the measurements was assessed by use of human whole blood and urine quality control materials. Several essential and non-essential showed significant variations in whole blood concentrations characterized by gender, population group and locality. Cd levels among non-Nenets non-smokers (0.19 µg/L) indicated a dietary intake at a natural global background level. Hg concentrations in whole blood show that not more than 10% of women in the fertile age had a Hg intake above the EFAS's recommendation. The Pb concentrations were in the range of, or partly exceeding reference values for increased risk of nephrotoxicity, and there is a need for a continued effort to reduce Pb exposure among the population groups in NAO. With high prevalence of obesity among the Nenets and non-Nenets population, a high prevalence of Fe-deficiency among menstruating women (
PubMed ID
33756428 View in PubMed
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Essential and non-essential elements in biological samples of inhabitants residing in Nenets Autonomous Okrug of the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311914
Source
Environ Int. 2021 07; 152:106510
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2021
Author
Nikita Sobolev
Dag G Ellingsen
Natalia Belova
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Anna Trofimova
Yulia Varakina
Dmitriy Kotsur
Andrej M Grjibovski
Valerii Chashchin
Konstantin Bogolitsyn
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Northern (Arctic) Federal University Named After M. V. Lomonosov, Naberezhnaya Severnoy Dvini 17, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia. Electronic address: n.a.sobolev@outlook.com.
Source
Environ Int. 2021 07; 152:106510
Date
07-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Humans
Mercury
Prevalence
Russia
Trace Elements - analysis
Abstract
Exposure of Arctic residents to environmental pollutants is an emerging public health problem receiving little global attention. The objective of this study was to assess whole blood concentrations of nine selected essential (Co, Cu, Mn, Se, Zn) and non-essential (As, Cd, Hg, Pb) elements among Nenets and non-Nenets adult residents of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO) living in seven coastal and inland settlements. Urine was collected in two settlements for assessment of iodine status. Altogether 297 whole blood and 68 urine samples were analysed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and the accuracy of the measurements was assessed by use of human whole blood and urine quality control materials. Several essential and non-essential showed significant variations in whole blood concentrations characterized by gender, population group and locality. Cd levels among non-Nenets non-smokers (0.19 µg/L) indicated a dietary intake at a natural global background level. Hg concentrations in whole blood show that not more than 10% of women in the fertile age had a Hg intake above the EFAS's recommendation. The Pb concentrations were in the range of, or partly exceeding reference values for increased risk of nephrotoxicity, and there is a need for a continued effort to reduce Pb exposure among the population groups in NAO. With high prevalence of obesity among the Nenets and non-Nenets population, a high prevalence of Fe-deficiency among menstruating women (
PubMed ID
33756428 View in PubMed
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Essential and non-essential trace elements in fish consumed by indigenous peoples of the European Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310216
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Oct; 253:966-973
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Nikita Sobolev
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Valery Chashchin
Dag G Ellingsen
Evert Nieboer
Yulia Varakina
Elena Veselkina
Dmitry Kotsur
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Northern (Arctic) Federal University Named After M. V. Lomonosov, Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia. Electronic address: n.sobolev@narfu.ru.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Oct; 253:966-973
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Arsenic - analysis
Cadmium - analysis
Cobalt - analysis
Copper - analysis
Cyprinidae
Dietary Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Fishes - metabolism
Humans
Mercury - analysis
Russia
Seafood - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Selenium - analysis
Trace Elements - analysis - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
In present study, the analyses of essential [copper (Cu), cobalt (Co), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn)] and non-essential elements [mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As)] in 7 fish species consumed by the indigenous people of the European Russia Arctic were conducted. The Nenets Autonomous Region, which is located in the north-eastern part of European Russia, was chosen as a Region of interest. Within it, the Nenets indigenous group (n?=?6000) constitutes approximately 10% of the total population. Nearly all of the Nenets live a traditional life with fish caught in the local waters as a subsistence resource. We found that northern pike contained twice the amount of Hg compared with roach, and 3-4 times more than other fish species commonly consumed in the Russian Arctic (namely, Arctic char, pink salmon, navaga, humpback whitefish and inconnu). Fish Hg concentrations were relatively low, but comparable to those reported in other investigations that illustrate a decreasing south-to-north trend in fish Hg concentrations. In the current study, northern pike is the only species for which Hg bioaccumulated significantly. In all fish species, both Cd and Pb were present in considerably lower concentrations than Hg. The total As concentrations observed are similar to those previously published, and it is assumed to be present primarily in non-toxic organic forms. All fish tissues were rich in the essential elements Se, Cu and Zn and, dependent on the amount fish consumed, may contribute significantly to the nutritional intake by indigenous Arctic peoples. We observed large significant differences in the molar Se/Hg ratios, which ranged from 2.3 for northern pike to 71.1 for pink salmon. Values of the latter 1 appear to enhance the protection against Hg toxicity.
PubMed ID
31351305 View in PubMed
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Iodine and bromine in fish consumed by indigenous peoples of the Russian Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306432
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 03 25; 10(1):5451
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-25-2020
Author
Nikita Sobolev
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Valery Chashchin
Dag G Ellingsen
Evert Nieboer
Yulia Varakina
Elena Plakhina
Alexandra Onuchina
Magny Skinlo Thomassen
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M.V. Lomonosov, Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Severnaya Dvina Emb. 17, 163002, Arkhangelsk, Russia. n.sobolev@narfu.ru.
Source
Sci Rep. 2020 03 25; 10(1):5451
Date
03-25-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Arsenic - analysis
Bromine - analysis
Cadmium - analysis
Copper - analysis
Fish Products - analysis
Fishes - metabolism
Fresh Water
Humans
Indigenous peoples
Iodine - analysis
Mercury - analysis
Russia
Seawater
Selenium - analysis
Zinc - analysis
Abstract
Fish muscle may constitute one of the main sources of iodine (I) for the indigenous peoples of the Russian Arctic, although limited information is available about its content in commonly consumed fish species. In the current study, bromine (Br), I, the essential elements (copper, selenium and zinc) and other non-essential elements - specifically mercury, arsenic (As), cadmium, lead and nickel - have been quantified in 10 fish species consumed by people living in the Nenets and Chukotka Regions. Fish muscle was analysed by ICP-MS after nitric acid or tetramethylammonium hydroxide digestion. Certified reference materials were employed and concentrations are reported as geometric means (GMs). Atlantic cod (6.32?mg/kg) and navaga (0.934?mg/kg) contained substantially higher amounts of I than all other fish species, while broad whitefish had the lowest (0.033?mg/kg). By comparison, navaga contained more Br (14.5?mg/kg) than the other fish species, ranging 7.45?mg/kg in Atlantic cod to 2.39?mg/kg in northern pike. A significant inter-fish association between As and I in freshwater and marine fish was observed, suggesting common sources and perhaps parallel absorption patterns. Only Atlantic cod and, to lesser extent, navaga constituted significant dietary sources of I.
PubMed ID
32214169 View in PubMed
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Iodine Status of Women and Infants in Russia: A Systematic Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304168
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 11 11; 17(22):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Date
11-11-2020
Author
Rimma Korobitsyna
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Anna Trofimova
Nikita Sobolev
Andrej M Grjibovski
Valery Chashchin
Yngvar Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Northern (Arctic) Federal University Named After M. V. Lomonosov, Naberezhnaya Severnoy Dvini 17, 163002 Arkhangelsk, Russia.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 11 11; 17(22):
Date
11-11-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review
Keywords
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant
Iodine - urine
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pregnant Women
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
This systematic review presents a critical synthesis of the available information on the iodine status among women and infants in Russia. Literature search was performed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines using PubMed, Scopus Web of Science databases as well as eLIBRARY-the Russian national source. Altogether, 277 papers were identified and 19 of them were eligible for the review. The data on median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) in women and infants from 25 Russian regions were presented. A substantial variability in UIC across the country with no clear geographical pattern was observed. Despite substantial heterogeneity in research methodology and data presentation the results suggest that the iodine status among pregnant women and infants in Russia is below the recommended levels. Our findings demonstrate that iodine deficiency is a re-emerging public health problem in Russia. Urgent public health measures on national, regional and individual levels are warranted.
PubMed ID
33187335 View in PubMed
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North Pacific Baleen Whales as a Potential Source of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) in the Diet of the Indigenous Peoples of the Eastern Arctic Coasts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307586
Source
Toxics. 2019 Dec 17; 7(4):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Dec-17-2019
Author
Pavel Chukmasov
Andrey Aksenov
Tatiana Sorokina
Yulia Varakina
Nikita Sobolev
Evert Nieboer
Author Affiliation
Arctic Biomonitoring Laboratory, Northern (Arctic) Federal University named after M. V. Lomonosov, Severnaya Dvina Emb. 17, Arkhangelsk 163002, Russia.
Source
Toxics. 2019 Dec 17; 7(4):
Date
Dec-17-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Abstract
Among marine mammals, gray and bowhead whales contain large amounts of fat and thereby constitute crucial dietary components of the traditional diet of indigenous peoples of the Eastern Arctic. Despite the high nutritional and cultural value of gray and bowhead whales, there is a risk of persistent organic pollutant (POP) intake by indigenous individuals who use marine mammals as their main source of fat. POPs are lipophilic pollutants and are known to accumulate and magnify along the marine food web. Consumption of foods contaminated by POPs can perturb the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems, and can potentially cause cancer. Moderate to relatively high concentrations of POPs have indeed been reported in the edible tissues of gray and bowhead whales consumed by indigenous peoples of the North Pacific Ocean. Even though their consumption is potentially harmful, there is no regular monitoring of eco-toxicants in the foods consumed by the indigenous peoples of the Eastern Arctic. In our view, the routine analyses of consumable parts of whales and of comparable nutritional items need to be included in the Russian Arctic Biomonitoring Programme.
PubMed ID
31861083 View in PubMed
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A taxonomic revision of two local endemic Radix spp. (Gastropoda: Lymnaeidae) from Khodutka geothermal area, Kamchatka, Russian Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257082
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3869:585-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ivan Bolotov
Yulia Bespalaya
Olga Aksenova
Andrey Aksenov
Nikita Bolotov
Mikhail Gofarov
Alexander Kondakov
Inga Paltser
Ilya Vikhrev
Author Affiliation
Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, the Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Severnaya Dvina Emb. 23, 163000 Arkhangelsk, Russian Federation; Email: inepras@yandex.ru.
Source
Zootaxa. 2014;3869:585-93
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Khodutka geothermal area is located near Khodutka and Priemysh volcanoes and is one of the largest geothermal areas of the Kamchatka Peninsula. Vakin (2003) described geological, geochemical and geothermic conditions of this geothermal area in detail. The main thermal water sources have temperatures up to 87°C and a discharge of approximately 150 l×sec.-1 are flows out into the warm lake with dimensions of ca. 250 m length and 80 m width. This warm river is ca. 20 m in width beginning from the lake and flows to the Bolshaya Khodutka River basin. Two local endemic Radix species were described from this geothermal area, especially Lymnaea (Radix) hadutkae Kruglov & Starobogatov, 1989 and L. (R.) thermokamtschatica Kruglov & Starobogatov, 1989 (Kruglov & Starobogatov 1989, 1993; Kruglov 2005). These species were separated using proportions of shell and reproductive system (Kruglov & Starobogatov 1989, 1993; Starobogatov et al. 2004). According to the diagnosis, L. (R.) hadutkae differs in the ear-shape shell, a form of the provaginal duct with cylindrical distal part and conical proximal part, and larger value of the index of the copulatory apparatus (ICA: proportion of the preputium to phallotheca is 1.27) from other species within the section Thermoradix Kruglov & Starobogatov, 1989. The last whorl is large, 0.86-0.89 of the shell height; an excess of the last whorl over upper margin of the aperture is 0.15-0.16 of the aperture height. L. (R.) thermokamtschatica has the cylindrical provaginal duct, relatively short bursa duct (1.5X longer than the bursa copulatrix diameter) and very long phallotheca (ICA is 0.77). The last whorl is large, 0.85-0.87 of the shell height; an excess of the last whorl over upper margin of the aperture is 0.2-0.25 of the aperture height. In accordance with an identification key (Starobogatov et al. 2004), the main diagnostic feature is an excess of the last whorl over the shell aperture, which has =0.78 and =0.80 of the penultimate whorl width in the first and second species, respectively. In the present paper, we revised these taxa using newly collected topotypes and additional Radix spp. specimens from other areas of the Russian Far East. 
PubMed ID
25283942 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.