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High rates of psychosis for black inpatients in Padua and Montreal: different contexts, similar findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145331
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Mar;46(3):247-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
G Eric Jarvis
Irene Toniolo
Andrew G Ryder
Francesco Sessa
Carla Cremonese
Author Affiliation
McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. eric.jarvis@mcgill.ca
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2011 Mar;46(3):247-53
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - statistics & numerical data
Italy - epidemiology - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - ethnology
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study tested the hypothesis that despite differences in setting, specifically in Padua or Montreal, black psychiatric inpatients will have higher rates of assigned diagnosis of psychosis than their non-black counterparts.
Data on psychotic patients admitted to the psychiatry ward were extracted from records of general hospitals in Padua and Montreal. Logistic regression analyses were conducted separately for each site to determine the relation between being black and receiving a diagnosis of psychosis, while controlling for sex and age.
Most black patients at both sites received a diagnosis of psychosis (76% in Padua and 81% in Montreal). Being black was independently and positively associated with being diagnosed with psychosis compared to patients from other groups.
Black patients admitted to psychiatry, whether in Padua or Montreal, were more likely to be assigned a diagnosis of psychosis than were other patients.
PubMed ID
20165832 View in PubMed
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