Skip header and navigation

Refine By

58 records – page 1 of 6.

Are forward bending of the trunk and low back pain associated among Danish blue-collar workers? A cross-sectional field study based on objective measures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277838
Source
Ergonomics. 2015;58(2):246-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Morten Villumsen
Afshin Samani
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Nidhi Gupta
Pascal Madeleine
Andreas Holtermann
Source
Ergonomics. 2015;58(2):246-58
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Female
Humans
Lifting - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Movement
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Posture
Prevalence
Risk factors
Torso - physiopathology
Work - physiology
Abstract
The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between the duration of objectively measured forward bending of the trunk and low back pain (LBP) intensity among 198 Danish blue-collar workers (male = 115; female = 83). The duration of forward bending of = 30°, = 60° and = 90° was divided into high (the highest tertile) and low-moderate (the remaining tertiles) categories. High (>5) and low ( = 5) pain intensities were categorised from a self-reported 0-9 scale. Results of multi-adjusted logistic regressions indicated no significant positive associations between forward bending and LBP intensity. On the contrary, higher duration of forward bending of = 30° was associated with lower LBP intensity during all day (OR = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.15-1.02; p = 0.05) and work (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.17-1.15; p = 0.09). This indication of a negative association may be explained by fear-avoidance behaviour of the blue-collar worker, job crafting or healthy worker effect.
PubMed ID
25374330 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between health and sickness absence among Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125014
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 May;86(4):397-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Isabella G Carneiro
Charlotte D N Rasmussen
Marie B Jørgensen
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Kasper Olesen
Pascal Madeleine
Dorte Ekner
Karen Søgaard
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. igc@nrcwe.dk
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 May;86(4):397-405
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Housekeeping
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - ethnology
Odds Ratio
Self Report
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the study is to investigate the association between health and sickness absence among Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners in Denmark.
This study is based on a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 2007 to 2008. The study population includes 276 cleaners, 144 Danish and 132 non-Western immigrant cleaners. Cumulative sickness absences during a 6-month period from administrative records were subdivided into no sickness absence (0 days), low occurrence of sickness absence (1-10 days) and high occurrence of sickness absence (over 10 days). Measures of health consisted of self-report and objective assessments. The relationship between sickness absence and health was analyzed through multinomial logistic regression, stratified by immigrant status.
For both Danish and non-Western immigrant cleaners, poor self-reported health was significantly related to high occurrence of sickness absence. Among Danish cleaners, high blood pressure was related to high occurrence of sickness absence. Among non-Western immigrant cleaners, total body pain and having one or more diagnosed chronic disease were related to high occurrence of sickness absence. No association between health and low occurrence of sickness absence was found.
The findings confirm the importance of health for high occurrence of sickness absence, in both ethnic groups. Moreover, low occurrence of sickness absence was not related to the health conditions investigated.
PubMed ID
22526090 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between psychosocial work environment and hypertension among non-Western immigrant and Danish cleaners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128678
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Oct;85(7):829-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Kasper Olesen
Isabella G Carneiro
Marie B Jørgensen
Reiner Rugulies
Charlotte D N Rasmussen
Karen Søgaard
Andreas Holtermann
Mari-Ann Flyvholm
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 Oct;85(7):829-35
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Denmark
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology
Psychology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Work - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
Non-Western cleaners have reported better psychosocial work environment but worse health compared with their Danish colleagues. The aim of this study was to compare the association between psychosocial work environment and hypertension among non-Western immigrant cleaners and Danish cleaners.
Two hundred and eighty-five cleaners from nine workplaces in Denmark participated in this cross-sectional study. The cleaners were identified as non-Western immigrants (n = 137) or Danes (n = 148). Blood pressure was measured in a seated position, and psychosocial work environment was assessed by the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ). In each population, multivariate logistic regressions were applied testing for an association between each of the COPSOQ scales and hypertension.
Models adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoking, workplace and physical work exertion showed that high Trust regarding management (OR = 0.50) and high Predictability (OR = 0.63) were statistically significantly associated with low prevalence of hypertension in the Danish population. In the immigrant population, no significant associations were found. Analyses on interaction effects showed that associations between Meaning of work and hypertension were significantly different among the two populations (p 
PubMed ID
22179817 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of standard and compositional data analysis in studies addressing group differences in sedentary behavior and physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296867
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 15; 15(1):53
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-15-2018
Author
Nidhi Gupta
Svend Erik Mathiassen
Glòria Mateu-Figueras
Marina Heiden
David M Hallman
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. ngu@nrcwe.dk.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2018 06 15; 15(1):53
Date
06-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accelerometry - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sedentary Behavior
Sex Factors
Sleep
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Data on time spent in physical activity, sedentary behavior and sleep during a day is compositional in nature, i.e. they add up to a constant value. Compositional data have fundamentally different properties from unconstrained data in real space, and require other analytical procedures, referred to as compositional data analysis (CoDA). Most physical activity and sedentary behavior studies, however, still apply analytical procedures adapted to data in real space, which can lead to misleading results. The present study describes a comparison of time spent sedentary and in physical activity between age groups and sexes, and investigates the extent to which results obtained by CoDA differ from those obtained using standard analytical procedures.
Time spent sedentary, standing, and in physical activity (walking/running/stair climbing/cycling) during work and leisure was determined for 1-4 days among 677 blue-collar workers using accelerometry. Differences between sexes and age groups were tested using MANOVA, using both a standard and a CoDA approach based on isometric log-ratio transformed data.
When determining differences between sexes for different activities time at work, the effect size using standard analysis (?2?=?0.045, p?
PubMed ID
29903009 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in heart rate reserve of similar physical activities during work and in leisure time - A study among Danish blue-collar workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296989
Source
Physiol Behav. 2018 03 15; 186:45-51
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-15-2018
Author
Pieter Coenen
Mette Korshøj
David M Hallman
Maaike A Huysmans
Allard J van der Beek
Leon M Straker
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University, Perth, Australia. Electronic address: p.coenen@vumc.nl.
Source
Physiol Behav. 2018 03 15; 186:45-51
Date
03-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Employment
Exercise - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Heart Rate Determination
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent studies suggest that while leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) promotes general health, engaging in occupational physical activity (OPA) may have negative health consequences. It has been hypothesized that the different health effects from OPA and LTPA can be explained by differences in physical activity (PA) intensity in these two domains. To assess the intensity of OPA and LTPA, we aimed to study the percentage heart rate reserve (%HRR) during similar types of OPA and LTPA during workdays. Data from the NOMAD study on Danish blue-collar workers (n=124) with objective measurements of PA (using accelerometers) and heart rate (using heart rate monitors) for 4 workdays were analysed. Activities of sitting, standing, moving, walking, and stair climbing were identified and %HRR in each of these activities was determined for work and leisure. %HRR was significantly higher during OPA than LTPA. These differences were more pronounced in men than in women. Although not statistically significant in the fully adjusted model, we found indications that these differences were more pronounced in those with low compared to high fitness. To our knowledge, this is the first study with objective measurements showing that %HRR is higher during the same gross-body postural activities when performed at work compared to leisure-time during workdays. This elevated intensity may help explaining the negative health consequences of engagement in high levels of OPA. Future guidelines should distinguish OPA from LTPA, possibly by advising workers to remain active during their leisure time, in particular when they are highly active at work.
PubMed ID
29341873 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does rare use of assistive devices during patient handling increase the risk of low back pain? A prospective cohort study among female healthcare workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268524
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Apr;88(3):335-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Andreas Holtermann
Thomas Clausen
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Birgit Aust
Ole Steen Mortensen
Alex Burdorf
Nils Fallentin
Lars L Andersen
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Apr;88(3):335-42
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Logistic Models
Low Back Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Moving and Lifting Patients - adverse effects - methods
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Self-Help Devices - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To investigate whether rare use of assistive devices during patient handling increases the respective risk for infrequent and frequent low back pain (LBP) among female healthcare workers reporting to be free of LBP at baseline.
Female healthcare workers replied to questionnaires about use of assistive devices during patient handling activities (rarely, occasionally and often) and LBP in both 2005 and 2006. Among those reporting to be free of LBP (0 days the past 12 months) in 2005 (n = 1,478), the multi-adjusted odds ratio for developing infrequent LBP (1-30 days the past 12 months) and frequent LBP (>30 days the past 12 months) in 2006 depending on use of assistive devices was prospectively investigated.
The multi-adjusted odds ratio for developing infrequent LBP was 1.21 (95 % CI 0.90-1.62) for those occasionally using assistive devices, and 1.78 (95 % CI 1.19-2.66) for those rarely using assistive devices, referencing healthcare workers often using assistive devices during patient handling (p
PubMed ID
25053444 View in PubMed
Less detail

Does workplace health promotion in Denmark reach relevant target groups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269943
Source
Health Promot Int. 2015 Jun;30(2):318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marie Birk Jørgensen
Ebbe Villadsen
Hermann Burr
Ole Steen Mortensen
Andreas Holtermann
Source
Health Promot Int. 2015 Jun;30(2):318-27
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Sex Factors
Smoking
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of the current study was to investigate whether Workplace Health Promotion (WHP) is available for workers with poor health status (overweight, musculoskeletal disorders, sickness absence and poor self-rated health) or health behaviour (smoking, poor diet and sedentarism) and whether they participate in WHP. In total, 9835 workers responded to questions regarding availability to 6 different types of WHP through The Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2010. Logistic regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and industry were performed to calculate odds ratios for availability and participation of WHP among groups with different health behaviours and health status. In general, poor health behaviours were associated with reduced availability of and participation in WHP. In contrast, poor health status was generally associated with higher availability of WHP and increased participation. However, poor self-rated health was associated with lower availability of several types of WHP and reduced participation. In general, workers with health challenges that are visible to others had WHP available, whereas workers with less visible health challenges had WHP less frequently available. Health challenges visible to others were associated with higher participation in WHP, whereas poor health behaviour and reduced self-rated health were associated with reduced participation in WHP programmes.
PubMed ID
23770769 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dose-response relation between perceived physical exertion during healthcare work and risk of long-term sickness absence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123263
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2012 Nov;38(6):582-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lars L Andersen
Thomas Clausen
Roger Persson
Andreas Holtermann
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. lla@nrcwe.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2012 Nov;38(6):582-9
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Proportional Hazards Models
Sick Leave
Abstract
An imbalance between physical work demands and physical capacity of the worker may be a risk factor for poor health. Perceived physical exertion provides information about the individual perception of the work demands relative to the capacity to perform the work. This study estimates the risk for long-term sickness absence (LTSA) from perceived physical exertion among healthcare workers.
This prospective cohort study comprises 8592 Danish healthcare workers who responded to a baseline questionnaire in 2004-2005 and subsequently were followed for one year in the Danish Register for Evaluation of Marginalization (DREAM), a national register of social transfer payments. Using Cox regression hazard ratio (HR) analysis, controlled for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), smoking, tenure, leisure-time physical activity, psychosocial working conditions, and LTSA during one year prior to baseline, we modeled risk estimates of moderate and strenuous (reference: light) perceived physical exertion during healthcare work for onset of LTSA (receiving sickness absence compensation for =8 consecutive weeks) during 1-year follow-up.
At baseline, 35.1%, 39.4%, and 25.5% of the healthcare workers experienced, respectively, light, moderate, and strenuous physical exertion during healthcare work. During follow-up, the 12-month prevalence of LTSA was 4.6%, 6.4%, and 8.9%, respectively, in these three exertion groups. A dose-response pattern between physical exertion and the risk for LTSA was found (trend test P
PubMed ID
22714069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of body mass index and physical exercise on risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis: longitudinal data from the Norwegian HUNT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125149
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Aug;66(8):678-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Paul Jarle Mork
Andreas Holtermann
Tom Ivar Lund Nilsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dragvoll Idrettssenter, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. paul.mork@svt.ntnu.no
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Aug;66(8):678-83
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Chronic Pain - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Exercise - physiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Joints - physiopathology
Leisure Activities - psychology
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis, Hip - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Overweight - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Mechanical joint stress imposed by high body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This prospective study investigated the independent and joint association of BMI and physical exercise on risk of knee and hip osteoarthritis.
The study includes 15,191 women and 14,766 men in the Norwegian HUNT Study without pain or physical impairment at baseline. Occurrence of self-reported physician-diagnosed osteoarthritis was assessed at 11 years of follow-up.
BMI was positively related to risk of knee osteoarthritis (P(trend)0.34). Exercise intensity was not associated with risk of osteoarthritis in any BMI category; that is, obese persons reporting high-intensity exercise had an RR of 1.28 (95% CI 0.59 to 2.79) for severe osteoarthritis compared with inactive persons.
High BMI increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis and severe osteoarthritis. Physical exercise does not increase the risk of osteoarthritis at any level of BMI, suggesting that exercise could be encouraged also among individuals with excessive body mass, without concern for an increased risk of osteoarthritis.
PubMed ID
22511797 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of physical exercise interventions on musculoskeletal pain in all body regions among office workers: a one-year randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98919
Source
Man Ther. 2010 Feb;15(1):100-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Lars L Andersen
Karl Bang Christensen
Andreas Holtermann
Otto M Poulsen
Gisela Sjøgaard
Mogens T Pedersen
Ernst A Hansen
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkalle 105, DK 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. lla@nrcwe.dk
Source
Man Ther. 2010 Feb;15(1):100-4
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Computer Terminals
Denmark
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength Dynamometer
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Neck Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Pain - diagnosis - etiology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Questionnaires
Resistance Training - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Single-Blind Method
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study investigated effects of physical exercise on musculoskeletal pain symptoms in all regions of the body, as well as on other musculoskeletal pain in association with neck pain. A single blind randomized controlled trial testing a one-year exercise intervention was performed among 549 office workers; specific neck/shoulder resistance training, all-round physical exercise, or a reference intervention. Pain symptoms were determined by questionnaire screening of twelve selected body regions. Case individuals were identified for each body region as those reporting pain intensities at baseline of 3 or more (scale of 0-9) during the last three months. For neck cases specifically, the additional number of pain regions was counted. Intensity of pain decreased significantly more in the neck, low back, right elbow and right hand in cases of the two exercise groups compared with the reference group (P
PubMed ID
19716742 View in PubMed
Less detail

58 records – page 1 of 6.