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Associations of very high intakes of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids with biomarkers of chronic disease risk among Yup'ik Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145961
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):777-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Zeina Makhoul
Alan R Kristal
Roman Gulati
Bret Luick
Andrea Bersamin
Bert Boyer
Gerald V Mohatt
Author Affiliation
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. zmakhoul@fhcrc.org
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;91(3):777-85
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Docosahexaenoic Acids - administration & dosage - blood
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Eicosapentaenoic Acid - administration & dosage - blood
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Female
Humans
Inuits
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Few studies have examined the associations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with biomarkers of chronic disease risk in populations with high intakes.
We examined the associations of red blood cell (RBC) EPA and DHA, as percentages of total fatty acids, with biomarkers of chronic disease risk across a wide range of EPA and DHA intakes.
In a cross-sectional study of 357 Yup'ik Eskimos, generalized additive models were used to plot covariate-adjusted associations of EPA and DHA with chronic disease biomarkers. Linear regression models were used to test for the statistical significance of these associations.
Means (5th-95th percentiles) for RBC EPA and DHA were 2.8% (0.5-5.9%) and 6.8% (3.3-9.0%), respectively. Associations of EPA and DHA were inverse and linear for triglycerides (beta +/- SE = -0.10 +/- 0.01 and -0.05 +/- 0.01, respectively) and positive and linear for HDL cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 2.0 +/- 0.5 and 0.9 +/- 0.6, respectively) and apolipoprotein A-I (beta +/- SE = 2.6 +/- 0.8 and 1.7 +/- 0.8, respectively). Positive linear associations of DHA with LDL and total cholesterol (beta +/- SE = 7.5 +/- 1.4 and 6.80 +/- 1.57, respectively) were observed; for EPA, these associations were nonlinear and restricted to concentrations approximately 3% of total fatty acids; for DHA, it was observed only at concentrations approximately >7% of total fatty acids.
Increasing EPA and DHA intakes to amounts well above those consumed by the general US population may have strong beneficial effects on chronic disease risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20089728 View in PubMed
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Bi-cultural dynamics for risk and protective factors for cardiometabolic health in an Alaska Native (Yup'ik) population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286815
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0183451
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Jacques Philip
Tove K Ryman
Scarlett E Hopkins
Diane M O'Brien
Andrea Bersamin
Jeremy Pomeroy
Kenneth E Thummel
Melissa A Austin
Bert B Boyer
Kirk Dombrowski
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0183451
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Alaska Native people experience disparities in mortality from heart disease and stroke. This work attempts to better understand the relationships between socioeconomic, behavioral, and cardiometabolic risk factors among Yup'ik people of southwestern Alaska, with a focus on the role of the socioeconomic, and cultural components. Using a cross-sectional sample of 486 Yup'ik adults, we fitted a Partial Least Squares Path Model (PLS-PM) to assess the associations between components, including demographic factors [age and gender], socioeconomic factors [education, economic status, Yup'ik culture, and Western culture], behavioral factors [diet, cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use, and physical activity], and cardiometabolic risk factors [adiposity, triglyceride-HDL and LDL lipids, glycemia, and blood pressure]. We found relatively mild associations of education and economic status with cardiometabolic risk factors, in contrast with studies in other populations. The socioeconomic factor and participation in Yup'ik culture had potentially protective associations with adiposity, triglyceride-HDL lipids, and blood pressure, whereas participation in Western culture had a protective association with blood pressure. We also found a moderating effect of participation in Western culture on the relationships between Yup'ik culture participation and both blood pressure and LDL lipids, indicating a potentially beneficial additional effect of bi-culturalism. Our results suggest that reinforcing protective effects of both Yup'ik and Western cultures could be useful for interventions aimed at reducing cardiometabolic health disparities.
PubMed ID
29091709 View in PubMed
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Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios predict intake of sweeteners in a Yup'ik study population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117895
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):161-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Sarah H Nash
Alan R Kristal
Andrea Bersamin
Scarlett E Hopkins
Bert B Boyer
Diane M O'Brien
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, AK, USA. shnash@alaska.edu
Source
J Nutr. 2013 Feb;143(2):161-5
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Beverages - analysis
Biological Markers - blood
Carbon Isotopes
Diet - ethnology
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Nitrogen Isotopes
Nutrition Assessment
Sweetening Agents - administration & dosage - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The carbon isotope ratio (d¹³C) is elevated in corn- and cane sugar-based foods and has recently shown associations with sweetener intake in multiple U.S. populations. However, a high carbon isotope ratio is not specific to corn- and sugar cane-based sweeteners, as other foods, including meats and fish, also have elevated d¹³C. This study examines whether the inclusion of a second marker, the nitrogen isotope ratio (d¹5N), can control for confounding dietary effects on d¹³C and improve the validity of isotopic markers of sweetener intake. The study participants are from the Yup'ik population of southwest Alaska and consume large and variable amounts of fish and marine mammals known to have elevated carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Sixty-eight participants completed 4 weekly 24-h recalls followed by a blood draw. RBC d¹³C and d¹5N were used to predict sweetener intake, including total sugars, added sugars, and sugar-sweetened beverages. A model including both d¹³C and d¹5N explained more than 3 times as much of the variation in sweetener intake than did a model using only d¹³C. Because carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios are simultaneously determined in a single, high-throughput analysis, this dual isotope marker provides a simple method to improve the validity of stable isotope markers of sweetener intake with no additional cost. We anticipate that this multi-isotope approach will have utility in any population where a stable isotope biomarker is elevated in several food groups and there are appropriate "covariate" isotopes to control for intake of foods not of research interest.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23256142 View in PubMed
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Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program for remote underserved minority populations in the Pacific region: rationale and design of a community randomized trial to prevent early childhood obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265837
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:944
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lynne R Wilken
Rachel Novotny
Marie K Fialkowski
Carol J Boushey
Claudio Nigg
Yvette Paulino
Rachael Leon Guerrero
Andrea Bersamin
Don Vargo
Jang Kim
Jonathan Deenik
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:944
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Capacity building
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Micronesia - epidemiology
Minority Groups
Pediatric Obesity - ethnology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Research Design
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Although surveillance data are limited in the US Affiliated Pacific, Alaska, and Hawaii, existing data suggest that the prevalence of childhood obesity is similar to or in excess of other minority groups in the contiguous US. Strategies for addressing the childhood obesity epidemic in the region support the use of community-based, environmentally targeted interventions. The Children's Healthy Living Program is a partnership formed across institutions in the US Affiliated Pacific, Alaska, and Hawaii to design a community randomized environmental intervention trial and a prevalence survey to address childhood obesity in the region through affecting the food and physical activity environment.
The Children's Healthy Living Program community randomized trial is an environmental intervention trial in four matched-pair communities in American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and Hawaii and two matched-pair communities in Alaska. A cross-sectional sample of children (goal n = 180) in each of the intervention trial communities is being assessed for outcomes at baseline and at 24 months (18 months post-intervention). In addition to the collection of the participant-based measures of anthropometry, diet, physical activity, sleep and acanthosis nigricans, community assessments are also being conducted in intervention trial communities. The Freely Associated States of Micronesia (Federated States of Micronesia, and Republics of Marshall Islands and Palau) is only conducting elements of the Children's Healthy Living Program sampling framework and similar measurements to provide prevalence data. In addition, anthropometry information will be collected for two additional communities in each of the 5 intervention jurisdictions to be included in the prevalence survey. The effectiveness of the environmental intervention trial is being assessed based on the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance) framework.
The Children's Healthy Living Program environmental trial is designed to focus on capacity building and to maximize the likelihood of sustainable impact on childhood obesity-related behaviors and outcomes. The multiple measures at the individual, community, and environment levels are designed to maximize the likelihood of detecting change. This approach enhances the likelihood for identifying and promoting the best methods to promote health and well-being of the children in the underserved US Affiliated Pacific Region.
NIH clinical trial # NCT01881373.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24107083 View in PubMed
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Collaborating with Alaska Native communities to design a cultural food intervention to address nutrition transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283417
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2017;11(1):71-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Jennifer Nu
Andrea Bersamin
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2017;11(1):71-80
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To address changing dietary patterns and declining dietary quality in indigenous communities, there is growing interest in implementing interventions that promote nutrient-dense, culturally important foods.
To describe formative research and an ongoing collaborative process to design a multilevel nutrition inter vention-Neqa Elicarvigmun or the Fish-to-School (F2S) Program-that reconnects students to their local food system in a remote Yup'ik community in Western Alaska.
Qualitative data that explored the connection between salmon and well-being were collected and collaboratively reviewed with a community work group and analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings were used to co-design the nutrition intervention.
Formative research Thndings and ongoing collaboration between academic and community partners informed the Thnal intervention design.
Because people's behaviors and interactions with culturally signiThcant foods are embedded in cultural perceptions and local contexts, it is important for nutrition interventions to address local perceptions of these foods.
PubMed ID
28603153 View in PubMed
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A community engagement process identifies environmental priorities to prevent early childhood obesity: the Children's Healthy Living (CHL) program for remote underserved populations in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands, Hawaii and Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265840
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec;18(10):2261-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Marie Kainoa Fialkowski
Barbara DeBaryshe
Andrea Bersamin
Claudio Nigg
Rachael Leon Guerrero
Gena Rojas
Aufa'i Apulu Ropeti Areta
Agnes Vargo
Tayna Belyeu-Camacho
Rose Castro
Bret Luick
Rachel Novotny
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec;18(10):2261-74
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Based Participatory Research
Family
Female
Hawaii
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Minority Groups
Pacific Islands
Parents
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Program Development
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Underserved minority populations in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI), Hawaii, and Alaska display disproportionate rates of childhood obesity. The region's unique circumstance should be taken into account when designing obesity prevention interventions. The purpose of this paper is to (a), describe the community engagement process (CEP) used by the Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program for remote underserved minority populations in the USAPI, Hawaii, and Alaska (b) report community-identified priorities for an environmental intervention addressing early childhood (ages 2-8 years) obesity, and (c) share lessons learned in the CEP. Four communities in each of five CHL jurisdictions (Alaska, American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Hawai'i) were selected to participate in the community-randomized matched-pair trial. Over 900 community members including parents, teachers, and community leaders participated in the CEP over a 14 month period. The CEP was used to identify environmental intervention priorities to address six behavioral outcomes: increasing fruit/vegetable consumption, water intake, physical activity and sleep; and decreasing screen time and intake of sugar sweetened beverages. Community members were engaged through Local Advisory Committees, key informant interviews and participatory community meetings. Community-identified priorities centered on policy development; role modeling; enhancing access to healthy food, clean water, and physical activity venues; and healthy living education. Through the CEP, CHL identified culturally appropriate priorities for intervention that were also consistent with the literature on effective obesity prevention practices. Results of the CEP will guide the CHL intervention design and implementation. The CHL CEP may serve as a model for other underserved minority island populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24043557 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community involvement in design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition interventions to reduce chronic diseases in indigenous populations in the U.S.: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294385
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
08-13-2018
Author
Jinan Banna
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, USA. jcbanna@hawaii.edu.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Date
08-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Abstract
Indigenous peoples of the United States disproportionately experience chronic diseases associated with poor nutrition, including obesity and diabetes. While chronic disease related health disparities among Indigenous people are well documented, it is unknown whether interventions adequately address these health disparities. In addition, it is unknown whether and to what extent interventions are culturally adapted or tailored to the unique culture, worldview and nutrition environments of Indigenous people. The aim of this review was to identify and characterize nutrition interventions conducted with Indigenous populations in the US, and to determine whether and to what degree communities are involved in intervention design, implementation and evaluation.
Peer-reviewed articles were identified using MEDLINE. Articles included were published in English in a refereed journal between 2000 and 2015, reported on a diet-related intervention in Indigenous populations in the US, and reported outcome data. Data extracted were program objectives and activities, target population, geographic region, formative research to inform design and evaluation, partnership, capacity building, involvement of the local food system, and outcomes. Narrative synthesis of intervention characteristics and the degree and type of community involvement was performed.
Of 1060 records identified, 49 studies were included. Overall, interventions were successful in producing changes in knowledge, behavior or health (79%). Interventions mostly targeted adults in the Western region and used a pre-test, post-test design. Involvement of communities in intervention design, implementation, and evaluation varied from not at all to involvement at all stages. Of programs reporting significant changes in outcomes, more than half used at least three strategies to engage communities. However, formative research to inform the evaluation was not performed to a great degree, and fewer than half of the programs identified described involvement of the local food system.
The extent of use of strategies to promote community engagement in programs reporting significant outcomes is notable. In planning interventions in Indigenous groups, researchers should consider ways to involve the community in intervention design, execution and evaluation. There is a particular need for studies focused on Indigenous youth in diverse regions of the US to further address diet-related chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):251-65 PMID 10181023
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;14(10):763-72 PMID 15573453
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2004 Nov-Dec;36(6):298-304 PMID 15617611
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2008 May;24(2):193-8 PMID 18436971
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Mar;34(3):192-201 PMID 18312806
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):569-78 PMID 15257848
Cites: J Nutr Educ. 2001 Jan-Feb;33(1):59-60 PMID 12031209
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-83 PMID 20220114
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):24-32 PMID 23086589
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):401-6 PMID 12180522
Cites: J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2002 Jul-Aug;42(4):652-5 PMID 12150364
Cites: NCHS Data Brief. 2015 Nov;(219):1-8 PMID 26633046
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):344-8 PMID 19349563
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):154-85 PMID 22569730
Cites: J Community Health. 2010 Dec;35(6):667-75 PMID 20508978
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):1030-8 PMID 14594792
Cites: Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep. 2013 Dec 1;7(6):null PMID 24367710
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Nov;152(5):867-75 PMID 17070147
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb;18 Suppl 1:S84-90 PMID 20107467
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S70-9 PMID 14636811
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2012 Mar;13(2):245-51 PMID 21730195
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010 Spring;4(1):7-16 PMID 20364073
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jul;36(7):2027-34 PMID 23275375
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):606-11 PMID 12740449
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-99 PMID 19376928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Sep;126(3):434-42 PMID 20713482
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;39(1):109-18 PMID 23150531
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S46-54 PMID 14636808
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72 PMID 21059153
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2013 May;(257):1-184 PMID 25116426
Cites: J Health Commun. 2008 Apr-May;13(3):230-49 PMID 18569356
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jul;3(3):A103 PMID 16776864
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Aug;113(8):1076-83 PMID 23885704
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):80-90 PMID 20102831
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2009 May;68(4):80-4 PMID 19583109
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):170-9 PMID 24756887
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Jan;25(1):78-83 PMID 11772905
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Sep;109(9):1532-9 PMID 19699832
Cites: Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2014 Dec;73(12 Suppl 3):29-33 PMID 25535599
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-70 PMID 17451135
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Oct;24(10):1770-5 PMID 11574440
Cites: Can J Diabetes. 2016 Aug;40(4):304-10 PMID 27374251
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2010 Sep;25(3):329-36 PMID 20146041
Cites: Transl Behav Med. 2014 Jun;4(2):149-59 PMID 24904698
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S55-61 PMID 14636809
Cites: WMJ. 2005 Jul;104(5):44-7 PMID 16138515
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Mar;36(3):309-19 PMID 12634022
Cites: Risk Anal. 2009 May;29(5):729-42 PMID 19220800
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Apr 9;299(14):1678-89 PMID 18398080
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S24-34 PMID 14636806
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S35-45 PMID 14636807
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-53 PMID 21753059
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S13-23 PMID 14636805
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Jan-Feb;38(1):18-24 PMID 16595274
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):773S-781S PMID 10195602
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2014 Feb;(260):1-161 PMID 24819891
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):224-9 PMID 16757660
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):416-27 PMID 18469413
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 May;24(5):811-6 PMID 11347735
Cites: Child Adolesc Social Work J. 2010 Jun 1;27(3):231-244 PMID 20582152
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Nov;20(11):2241-9 PMID 22513491
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):779-83 PMID 20299650
Cites: J Diabetes Mellitus. 2013 Nov 1;3(4):184-191 PMID 24634801
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Sep;143(9):1494-500 PMID 23864511
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Sep;12(9):1426-34 PMID 15483207
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64 PMID 25211728
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2000 Aug;35(3):561-89 PMID 10966086
PubMed ID
30103753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community involvement in design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition interventions to reduce chronic diseases in indigenous populations in the U.S.: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296170
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review
Date
08-13-2018
Author
Jinan Banna
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, USA. jcbanna@hawaii.edu.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Date
08-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review
Keywords
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community participation
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Nutrition Disorders - diet therapy - prevention & control
Population Groups
United States
Abstract
Indigenous peoples of the United States disproportionately experience chronic diseases associated with poor nutrition, including obesity and diabetes. While chronic disease related health disparities among Indigenous people are well documented, it is unknown whether interventions adequately address these health disparities. In addition, it is unknown whether and to what extent interventions are culturally adapted or tailored to the unique culture, worldview and nutrition environments of Indigenous people. The aim of this review was to identify and characterize nutrition interventions conducted with Indigenous populations in the US, and to determine whether and to what degree communities are involved in intervention design, implementation and evaluation.
Peer-reviewed articles were identified using MEDLINE. Articles included were published in English in a refereed journal between 2000 and 2015, reported on a diet-related intervention in Indigenous populations in the US, and reported outcome data. Data extracted were program objectives and activities, target population, geographic region, formative research to inform design and evaluation, partnership, capacity building, involvement of the local food system, and outcomes. Narrative synthesis of intervention characteristics and the degree and type of community involvement was performed.
Of 1060 records identified, 49 studies were included. Overall, interventions were successful in producing changes in knowledge, behavior or health (79%). Interventions mostly targeted adults in the Western region and used a pre-test, post-test design. Involvement of communities in intervention design, implementation, and evaluation varied from not at all to involvement at all stages. Of programs reporting significant changes in outcomes, more than half used at least three strategies to engage communities. However, formative research to inform the evaluation was not performed to a great degree, and fewer than half of the programs identified described involvement of the local food system.
The extent of use of strategies to promote community engagement in programs reporting significant outcomes is notable. In planning interventions in Indigenous groups, researchers should consider ways to involve the community in intervention design, execution and evaluation. There is a particular need for studies focused on Indigenous youth in diverse regions of the US to further address diet-related chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):251-65 PMID 10181023
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;14(10):763-72 PMID 15573453
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2004 Nov-Dec;36(6):298-304 PMID 15617611
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2008 May;24(2):193-8 PMID 18436971
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Mar;34(3):192-201 PMID 18312806
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):569-78 PMID 15257848
Cites: J Nutr Educ. 2001 Jan-Feb;33(1):59-60 PMID 12031209
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-83 PMID 20220114
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):24-32 PMID 23086589
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):401-6 PMID 12180522
Cites: J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2002 Jul-Aug;42(4):652-5 PMID 12150364
Cites: NCHS Data Brief. 2015 Nov;(219):1-8 PMID 26633046
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):344-8 PMID 19349563
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):154-85 PMID 22569730
Cites: J Community Health. 2010 Dec;35(6):667-75 PMID 20508978
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):1030-8 PMID 14594792
Cites: Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep. 2013 Dec 1;7(6):null PMID 24367710
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Nov;152(5):867-75 PMID 17070147
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb;18 Suppl 1:S84-90 PMID 20107467
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S70-9 PMID 14636811
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2012 Mar;13(2):245-51 PMID 21730195
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010 Spring;4(1):7-16 PMID 20364073
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jul;36(7):2027-34 PMID 23275375
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):606-11 PMID 12740449
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-99 PMID 19376928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Sep;126(3):434-42 PMID 20713482
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;39(1):109-18 PMID 23150531
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S46-54 PMID 14636808
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72 PMID 21059153
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2013 May;(257):1-184 PMID 25116426
Cites: J Health Commun. 2008 Apr-May;13(3):230-49 PMID 18569356
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jul;3(3):A103 PMID 16776864
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Aug;113(8):1076-83 PMID 23885704
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):80-90 PMID 20102831
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2009 May;68(4):80-4 PMID 19583109
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):170-9 PMID 24756887
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Jan;25(1):78-83 PMID 11772905
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Sep;109(9):1532-9 PMID 19699832
Cites: Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2014 Dec;73(12 Suppl 3):29-33 PMID 25535599
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-70 PMID 17451135
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Oct;24(10):1770-5 PMID 11574440
Cites: Can J Diabetes. 2016 Aug;40(4):304-10 PMID 27374251
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2010 Sep;25(3):329-36 PMID 20146041
Cites: Transl Behav Med. 2014 Jun;4(2):149-59 PMID 24904698
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S55-61 PMID 14636809
Cites: WMJ. 2005 Jul;104(5):44-7 PMID 16138515
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Mar;36(3):309-19 PMID 12634022
Cites: Risk Anal. 2009 May;29(5):729-42 PMID 19220800
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Apr 9;299(14):1678-89 PMID 18398080
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S24-34 PMID 14636806
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S35-45 PMID 14636807
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-53 PMID 21753059
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S13-23 PMID 14636805
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Jan-Feb;38(1):18-24 PMID 16595274
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):773S-781S PMID 10195602
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2014 Feb;(260):1-161 PMID 24819891
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):224-9 PMID 16757660
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):416-27 PMID 18469413
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 May;24(5):811-6 PMID 11347735
Cites: Child Adolesc Social Work J. 2010 Jun 1;27(3):231-244 PMID 20582152
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Nov;20(11):2241-9 PMID 22513491
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):779-83 PMID 20299650
Cites: J Diabetes Mellitus. 2013 Nov 1;3(4):184-191 PMID 24634801
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Sep;143(9):1494-500 PMID 23864511
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Sep;12(9):1426-34 PMID 15483207
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64 PMID 25211728
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2000 Aug;35(3):561-89 PMID 10966086
PubMed ID
30103753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consuming untreated water in four southwestern Alaska Native communities: reasons revealed and recommendations for change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260347
Source
J Environ Health. 2014 Dec;77(5):8-13; quiz 52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Troy L Ritter
Ellen D S Lopez
Rachel Goldberger
Jennifer Dobson
Korie Hickel
Jeffrey Smith
Rhonda M Johnson
Andrea Bersamin
Source
J Environ Health. 2014 Dec;77(5):8-13; quiz 52
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Drinking
Drinking Water - analysis
Humans
Indians, North American
Questionnaires
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
In this article, the authors provide the first in-depth account of why some Alaska Native people drink untreated water when treated water is available. Their qualitative research was conducted in four Alaska Native village communities that have treated water available from a centralized distribution point. Most respondents (n = 172; 82%) reported that some of their household's drinking water came from an untreated source. Motives for drinking untreated water emerged from analysis of open-ended questions about drinking water practice and could be categorized into six themes: chemicals, taste, health, access, tradition, and cost. Importantly, some residents reported consuming untreated water because they both liked untreated water and disliked treated water. As such, interventions to increase safe water consumption should address this dichotomy by providing education about the benefits of treated water alongside the risks involved with drinking untreated water. Based on the findings, the authors provide specific recommendations for developing behavior change interventions that address influences at multiple social-ecological levels.
PubMed ID
25619021 View in PubMed
Less detail

Enculturation, perceived stress, and physical activity: implications for metabolic risk among the Yup'ik--the Center for Alaska Native Health Research Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259238
Source
Ethn Health. 2014 Jun;19(3):255-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Andrea Bersamin
Christopher Wolsko
Bret R Luick
Bert B Boyer
Cecile Lardon
Scarlett E Hopkins
Judith S Stern
Sheri Zidenberg-Cherr
Source
Ethn Health. 2014 Jun;19(3):255-69
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adiposity - ethnology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inuits
Life Style - ethnology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
Rural Health - ethnology
Stress, Psychological - ethnology
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
American Indians and Alaska Natives (ANs) report among the lowest levels of physical activity in the USA, but there is very little systematic research examining the determinants of physical activity patterns in these populations. This study investigated the relationships between enculturation (or cultural traditionality), psychosocial stress, and physical activity in a community-based sample of Yup'ik women and men living in rural AN communities. Associations between these variables and several metabolic risk factors were also examined.
A sample of 488 Yup'ik participants (284 women and 204 men) from six villages in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region completed a wellness survey and an array of physiological assessments [e.g., body mass index (BMI), blood pressure]. A subset of 179 participants also completed a 3-day pedometer assessment of physical activity.
Multivariate linear regression models indicated that participants who were more enculturated (i.e., living more of a traditional lifestyle) and who experienced lower levels of psychosocial stress were significantly more physically active. In turn, both lower levels of psychosocial stress and higher levels of physical activity were associated with lower BMI, lower percent body fat, and lower waist circumference.
Findings underscore the importance of gaining a culturally specific understanding of physical activity patterns in indigenous groups in order to inform effective health promotion strategies.
PubMed ID
23297688 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.