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Community involvement in design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition interventions to reduce chronic diseases in indigenous populations in the U.S.: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294385
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
08-13-2018
Author
Jinan Banna
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, USA. jcbanna@hawaii.edu.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Date
08-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Abstract
Indigenous peoples of the United States disproportionately experience chronic diseases associated with poor nutrition, including obesity and diabetes. While chronic disease related health disparities among Indigenous people are well documented, it is unknown whether interventions adequately address these health disparities. In addition, it is unknown whether and to what extent interventions are culturally adapted or tailored to the unique culture, worldview and nutrition environments of Indigenous people. The aim of this review was to identify and characterize nutrition interventions conducted with Indigenous populations in the US, and to determine whether and to what degree communities are involved in intervention design, implementation and evaluation.
Peer-reviewed articles were identified using MEDLINE. Articles included were published in English in a refereed journal between 2000 and 2015, reported on a diet-related intervention in Indigenous populations in the US, and reported outcome data. Data extracted were program objectives and activities, target population, geographic region, formative research to inform design and evaluation, partnership, capacity building, involvement of the local food system, and outcomes. Narrative synthesis of intervention characteristics and the degree and type of community involvement was performed.
Of 1060 records identified, 49 studies were included. Overall, interventions were successful in producing changes in knowledge, behavior or health (79%). Interventions mostly targeted adults in the Western region and used a pre-test, post-test design. Involvement of communities in intervention design, implementation, and evaluation varied from not at all to involvement at all stages. Of programs reporting significant changes in outcomes, more than half used at least three strategies to engage communities. However, formative research to inform the evaluation was not performed to a great degree, and fewer than half of the programs identified described involvement of the local food system.
The extent of use of strategies to promote community engagement in programs reporting significant outcomes is notable. In planning interventions in Indigenous groups, researchers should consider ways to involve the community in intervention design, execution and evaluation. There is a particular need for studies focused on Indigenous youth in diverse regions of the US to further address diet-related chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):251-65 PMID 10181023
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;14(10):763-72 PMID 15573453
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2004 Nov-Dec;36(6):298-304 PMID 15617611
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2008 May;24(2):193-8 PMID 18436971
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Mar;34(3):192-201 PMID 18312806
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):569-78 PMID 15257848
Cites: J Nutr Educ. 2001 Jan-Feb;33(1):59-60 PMID 12031209
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-83 PMID 20220114
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):24-32 PMID 23086589
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):401-6 PMID 12180522
Cites: J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2002 Jul-Aug;42(4):652-5 PMID 12150364
Cites: NCHS Data Brief. 2015 Nov;(219):1-8 PMID 26633046
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):344-8 PMID 19349563
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):154-85 PMID 22569730
Cites: J Community Health. 2010 Dec;35(6):667-75 PMID 20508978
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):1030-8 PMID 14594792
Cites: Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep. 2013 Dec 1;7(6):null PMID 24367710
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Nov;152(5):867-75 PMID 17070147
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb;18 Suppl 1:S84-90 PMID 20107467
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S70-9 PMID 14636811
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2012 Mar;13(2):245-51 PMID 21730195
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010 Spring;4(1):7-16 PMID 20364073
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jul;36(7):2027-34 PMID 23275375
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):606-11 PMID 12740449
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-99 PMID 19376928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Sep;126(3):434-42 PMID 20713482
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;39(1):109-18 PMID 23150531
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S46-54 PMID 14636808
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72 PMID 21059153
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2013 May;(257):1-184 PMID 25116426
Cites: J Health Commun. 2008 Apr-May;13(3):230-49 PMID 18569356
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jul;3(3):A103 PMID 16776864
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Aug;113(8):1076-83 PMID 23885704
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):80-90 PMID 20102831
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2009 May;68(4):80-4 PMID 19583109
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):170-9 PMID 24756887
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Jan;25(1):78-83 PMID 11772905
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Sep;109(9):1532-9 PMID 19699832
Cites: Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2014 Dec;73(12 Suppl 3):29-33 PMID 25535599
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-70 PMID 17451135
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Oct;24(10):1770-5 PMID 11574440
Cites: Can J Diabetes. 2016 Aug;40(4):304-10 PMID 27374251
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2010 Sep;25(3):329-36 PMID 20146041
Cites: Transl Behav Med. 2014 Jun;4(2):149-59 PMID 24904698
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S55-61 PMID 14636809
Cites: WMJ. 2005 Jul;104(5):44-7 PMID 16138515
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Mar;36(3):309-19 PMID 12634022
Cites: Risk Anal. 2009 May;29(5):729-42 PMID 19220800
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Apr 9;299(14):1678-89 PMID 18398080
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S24-34 PMID 14636806
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S35-45 PMID 14636807
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-53 PMID 21753059
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S13-23 PMID 14636805
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Jan-Feb;38(1):18-24 PMID 16595274
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):773S-781S PMID 10195602
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2014 Feb;(260):1-161 PMID 24819891
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):224-9 PMID 16757660
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):416-27 PMID 18469413
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 May;24(5):811-6 PMID 11347735
Cites: Child Adolesc Social Work J. 2010 Jun 1;27(3):231-244 PMID 20582152
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Nov;20(11):2241-9 PMID 22513491
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):779-83 PMID 20299650
Cites: J Diabetes Mellitus. 2013 Nov 1;3(4):184-191 PMID 24634801
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Sep;143(9):1494-500 PMID 23864511
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Sep;12(9):1426-34 PMID 15483207
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64 PMID 25211728
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2000 Aug;35(3):561-89 PMID 10966086
PubMed ID
30103753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community involvement in design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition interventions to reduce chronic diseases in indigenous populations in the U.S.: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296170
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review
Date
08-13-2018
Author
Jinan Banna
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, USA. jcbanna@hawaii.edu.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2018 08 13; 17(1):116
Date
08-13-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review
Keywords
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Community participation
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Nutrition Disorders - diet therapy - prevention & control
Population Groups
United States
Abstract
Indigenous peoples of the United States disproportionately experience chronic diseases associated with poor nutrition, including obesity and diabetes. While chronic disease related health disparities among Indigenous people are well documented, it is unknown whether interventions adequately address these health disparities. In addition, it is unknown whether and to what extent interventions are culturally adapted or tailored to the unique culture, worldview and nutrition environments of Indigenous people. The aim of this review was to identify and characterize nutrition interventions conducted with Indigenous populations in the US, and to determine whether and to what degree communities are involved in intervention design, implementation and evaluation.
Peer-reviewed articles were identified using MEDLINE. Articles included were published in English in a refereed journal between 2000 and 2015, reported on a diet-related intervention in Indigenous populations in the US, and reported outcome data. Data extracted were program objectives and activities, target population, geographic region, formative research to inform design and evaluation, partnership, capacity building, involvement of the local food system, and outcomes. Narrative synthesis of intervention characteristics and the degree and type of community involvement was performed.
Of 1060 records identified, 49 studies were included. Overall, interventions were successful in producing changes in knowledge, behavior or health (79%). Interventions mostly targeted adults in the Western region and used a pre-test, post-test design. Involvement of communities in intervention design, implementation, and evaluation varied from not at all to involvement at all stages. Of programs reporting significant changes in outcomes, more than half used at least three strategies to engage communities. However, formative research to inform the evaluation was not performed to a great degree, and fewer than half of the programs identified described involvement of the local food system.
The extent of use of strategies to promote community engagement in programs reporting significant outcomes is notable. In planning interventions in Indigenous groups, researchers should consider ways to involve the community in intervention design, execution and evaluation. There is a particular need for studies focused on Indigenous youth in diverse regions of the US to further address diet-related chronic conditions.
Notes
Cites: Health Educ Res. 1998 Jun;13(2):251-65 PMID 10181023
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 2004 Nov;14(10):763-72 PMID 15573453
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2004 Nov-Dec;36(6):298-304 PMID 15617611
Cites: J Hum Lact. 2008 May;24(2):193-8 PMID 18436971
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Mar;34(3):192-201 PMID 18312806
Cites: J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2004 Jun;13(5):569-78 PMID 15257848
Cites: J Nutr Educ. 2001 Jan-Feb;33(1):59-60 PMID 12031209
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr;100(4):677-83 PMID 20220114
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2013 Feb;45(1):24-32 PMID 23086589
Cites: Pac Health Dialog. 2001 Sep;8(2):401-6 PMID 12180522
Cites: J Am Pharm Assoc (Wash). 2002 Jul-Aug;42(4):652-5 PMID 12150364
Cites: NCHS Data Brief. 2015 Nov;(219):1-8 PMID 26633046
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2009 Apr;163(4):344-8 PMID 19349563
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):154-85 PMID 22569730
Cites: J Community Health. 2010 Dec;35(6):667-75 PMID 20508978
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Nov;78(5):1030-8 PMID 14594792
Cites: Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep. 2013 Dec 1;7(6):null PMID 24367710
Cites: Am Heart J. 2006 Nov;152(5):867-75 PMID 17070147
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Feb;18 Suppl 1:S84-90 PMID 20107467
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S70-9 PMID 14636811
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2012 Mar;13(2):245-51 PMID 21730195
Cites: Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2010 Spring;4(1):7-16 PMID 20364073
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Jul;36(7):2027-34 PMID 23275375
Cites: Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):606-11 PMID 12740449
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2010 Nov;11(6):888-99 PMID 19376928
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Sep;126(3):434-42 PMID 20713482
Cites: Diabetes Educ. 2013 Jan-Feb;39(1):109-18 PMID 23150531
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S46-54 PMID 14636808
Cites: Nurs Inq. 2010 Dec;17(4):359-72 PMID 21059153
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2013 May;(257):1-184 PMID 25116426
Cites: J Health Commun. 2008 Apr-May;13(3):230-49 PMID 18569356
Cites: Prev Chronic Dis. 2006 Jul;3(3):A103 PMID 16776864
Cites: J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Aug;113(8):1076-83 PMID 23885704
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Jan;110(1):80-90 PMID 20102831
Cites: Hawaii Med J. 2009 May;68(4):80-4 PMID 19583109
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2014 Sep;54(1-2):170-9 PMID 24756887
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Jan;25(1):78-83 PMID 11772905
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2009 Sep;109(9):1532-9 PMID 19699832
Cites: Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2014 Dec;73(12 Suppl 3):29-33 PMID 25535599
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Feb;66(1):62-70 PMID 17451135
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 Oct;24(10):1770-5 PMID 11574440
Cites: Can J Diabetes. 2016 Aug;40(4):304-10 PMID 27374251
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2010 Sep;25(3):329-36 PMID 20146041
Cites: Transl Behav Med. 2014 Jun;4(2):149-59 PMID 24904698
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S55-61 PMID 14636809
Cites: WMJ. 2005 Jul;104(5):44-7 PMID 16138515
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Mar;36(3):309-19 PMID 12634022
Cites: Risk Anal. 2009 May;29(5):729-42 PMID 19220800
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Apr 9;299(14):1678-89 PMID 18398080
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S24-34 PMID 14636806
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S35-45 PMID 14636807
Cites: J Nutr. 2011 Sep;141(9):1746-53 PMID 21753059
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 Dec;37(6 Pt 2):S13-23 PMID 14636805
Cites: J Nutr Educ Behav. 2006 Jan-Feb;38(1):18-24 PMID 16595274
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):773S-781S PMID 10195602
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2014 Feb;(260):1-161 PMID 24819891
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2006 Jul;17(3):224-9 PMID 16757660
Cites: J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2008 May;19(2):416-27 PMID 18469413
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2001 May;24(5):811-6 PMID 11347735
Cites: Child Adolesc Social Work J. 2010 Jun 1;27(3):231-244 PMID 20582152
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Nov;20(11):2241-9 PMID 22513491
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 May;100(5):779-83 PMID 20299650
Cites: J Diabetes Mellitus. 2013 Nov 1;3(4):184-191 PMID 24634801
Cites: J Nutr. 2013 Sep;143(9):1494-500 PMID 23864511
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Sep;12(9):1426-34 PMID 15483207
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Nov;104(11):e158-64 PMID 25211728
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2000 Aug;35(3):561-89 PMID 10966086
PubMed ID
30103753 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborating with Alaska Native communities to design a cultural food intervention to address nutrition transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283417
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2017;11(1):71-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Jennifer Nu
Andrea Bersamin
Source
Prog Community Health Partnersh. 2017;11(1):71-80
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To address changing dietary patterns and declining dietary quality in indigenous communities, there is growing interest in implementing interventions that promote nutrient-dense, culturally important foods.
To describe formative research and an ongoing collaborative process to design a multilevel nutrition inter vention-Neqa Elicarvigmun or the Fish-to-School (F2S) Program-that reconnects students to their local food system in a remote Yup'ik community in Western Alaska.
Qualitative data that explored the connection between salmon and well-being were collected and collaboratively reviewed with a community work group and analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings were used to co-design the nutrition intervention.
Formative research Thndings and ongoing collaboration between academic and community partners informed the Thnal intervention design.
Because people's behaviors and interactions with culturally signiThcant foods are embedded in cultural perceptions and local contexts, it is important for nutrition interventions to address local perceptions of these foods.
PubMed ID
28603153 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Text Messaging Intervention (Txt4HappyKids) to Promote Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Families With Young Children: Pilot Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297803
Source
JMIR Form Res. 2018 Jul 06; 2(2):e13
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-06-2018
Author
Julianne Mary Power
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States.
Source
JMIR Form Res. 2018 Jul 06; 2(2):e13
Date
Jul-06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Increasing fruit and vegetable intake among low-income populations, especially children, is a priority for United States federal food assistance programs. With over 49 million federal food assistance program recipients, cost-effective and efficient methods are needed to effectively deliver nutrition education to such a large population.
The objective of our study was to examine the preliminary efficacy and acceptability of a text messaging intervention, Txt4HappyKids, to promote fruit and vegetable intake among families with young children.
The intervention was evaluated using a pre-post study design. Parents (N=72) in Alaska were recruited from venues that serve a predominantly low-income population to participate in an 11-week intervention based on social cognitive theory. Parents received two texts per week promoting child fruit and vegetable intake. Behaviors, self-efficacy, and attitudes related to fruit and vegetable intake were measured at baseline and postintervention. Perceived changes in behaviors and open-ended feedback were also collected postintervention.
Of all participants, 67.3% (72/107) completed the intervention. We found no changes in behavior (P=.26), self-efficacy (P=.43), or attitudes (P=.35) related to fruit and vegetable intake from pre- to postintervention. Completers reported that since their participation in Txt4HappyKids, 92% (66/72) served more fruits and vegetables to their child because they thought fruits and vegetables were beneficial, 86% (62/72) tried to follow a healthier diet, 85% (61/72) tried different ways of preparing fruits and vegetables, and 81% (58/72) were more aware of the foods their child consumes. Additionally, 79% (57/72) of completers thought that Txt4HappyKids was credible, 71% (51/72) found texts useful, and 82% (59/72) would recommend it to a friend.
A text messaging intervention was not sufficient to increase fruit and vegetable intake among families with young children. However, parents felt positively impacted by Txt4HappyKids and were receptive to nutrition information, despite the absence of face-to-face contact. High satisfaction among completers indicates that text messaging may be an acceptable complement to budget-constrained nutrition programs. These findings are an important first step in developing larger multi-level interventions utilizing mobile technology; however, a more rigorous evaluation of the Txt4HappyKids intervention is warranted.
PubMed ID
30684412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Locally harvested foods support serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D sufficiency in an indigenous population of Western Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261899
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Bret Luick
Andrea Bersamin
Judith S Stern
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Organic Agriculture - methods
Population Groups - ethnology
Seasons
Sex Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
Low serum vitamin D is associated with higher latitude, age, body fat percentage and low intake of fatty fish. Little documentation of vitamin D concentrations is available for Alaska Native populations.
This study was undertaken to investigate serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations of the Yup'ik people of southwestern Alaska in relation to demographic and lifestyle variables, particularly with the use of locally harvested (local) foods.
Cross-sectional study.
We estimated 25(OH)D, dietary vitamin D and calcium, percent of energy from local foods and demographic variables in 497 Yup'ik people (43% males) aged 14-92 residing in southwestern Alaska. Sampling was approximately equally divided between synthesizing and non-synthesizing seasons, although the preponderance of samples were drawn during months of increasing daylight.
Mean vitamin D intake was 15.1 ± 20.2 µg/d, while local foods accounted for 22.9 ± 17.1% of energy intake. The leading sources of vitamin D were local fish (90.1%) followed by market foods. Mean 25(OH)D concentration was 95.6 ± 40.7 nmol/L. Participants in the upper 50th percentile of 25(OH)D concentration tended to be older, male, of lower body mass index, sampled during the synthesizing season, and among the upper 50th percentile of local food use.
A shift away from locally harvested foods will likely increase the risk for serum 25(OH)D insufficiency in this population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24665435 View in PubMed
Less detail

Yup'ik identity and socioeconomic status are associated with child consumption of traditional food and weight in rural Yup'ik communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282729
Source
Ethn Health. 2017 May 25;:1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-2017
Author
Anne-Claire Maurice
Jacques Philip
Andrea Bersamin
Source
Ethn Health. 2017 May 25;:1-11
Date
May-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
In remote, Alaska Native communities, traditional foods remain a significant source of essential nutrients and appear to protect against the development of chronic diseases. Relatively low intake of traditional foods among Alaska Native children is therefore of concern. The aim of this study was to identify household and parental predictors of child traditional food (TF) consumption and weight in remote Yup'ik communities of Alaska.
Children (10-18 years old) and parents in two communities (populations
PubMed ID
28540735 View in PubMed
Less detail

Exploring the Potential for Technology-Based Nutrition Education Among WIC Recipients in Remote Alaska Native Communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291599
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017 Jul - Aug; 49(7S2):S186-S191.e1
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Julianne M Power
Kathryn L Braun
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research and the Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK.
Source
J Nutr Educ Behav. 2017 Jul - Aug; 49(7S2):S186-S191.e1
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Child Nutrition Sciences - education
Communication Barriers
Education, Distance
Feasibility Studies
Female
Food Assistance
Humans
Internet
Mothers - education
Nutritional Sciences - education
Rural Health - ethnology
Smartphone
Young Adult
Abstract
Estimate media technology use in Alaska Native communities to inform the feasibility of technology-based nutrition education.
A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random selection of about 50% of Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) authorized representatives in remote Alaska Native communities (n = 975). Media technology use, interest in media technology-based nutrition education, and potential barriers were assessed. Chi-square tests were used to investigate associations among technology use, age, and education.
Technology use was common among respondents (n = 368); use was significantly more common among younger age groups and participants with a higher level of education. Smartphone (78.8%) and Facebook (95.8%) use was comparable to national averages, but having a computer at home (38.4%) was much less likely. Less than 50% of participants have Internet access at home.
Findings shed light on new opportunities for WIC and other programs to deliver nutrition education to Alaska Native people in remote communities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28689556 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298121
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Date
12-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Andrea Bersamin
Author Affiliation
a Department of Biology & Wildlife , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 12; 77(1):1419678
Date
12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Food
Food Supply
Humans
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. The pillars of food security include food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, the pillars may focus on traditional foods.
To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska.
Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: “traditional foods”, “food security”, “access”, “availability”, “utilisation”, “Alaska”, “Alaska Native” and “indigenous”.
Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents met the inclusion criteria. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8).
Studies that estimate the prevalence of traditional food insecurity in Alaska are virtually absent from the literature. Instead most studies provide a review of factors related to food security. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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Stable isotope biomarkers of traditional and market food intake in the Yup'ik population: Neqem Nallunailkutaa - The Foods' Marker Project

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284350
Source
Page 836 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):836
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
NUTRITION CQ\CTION Stable isotope biomarkers of traditional and market food intake in the Yup'ik population: Neqem Nallunailkutaa The Foods' Marker Project Diane O'Brien*, Sarah Nash, Andrea Bersamin, Scarlett Hopkins and Bert Boyer Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of
  1 document  
Author
Diane O'Brien
Sarah Nash
Andrea Bersamin
Scarlett Hopkins
Bert Boyer
Author Affiliation
Center for Alaska Native Health Research, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, USA
Source
Page 836 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):836
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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A scoping review of traditional food security in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288013
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Amanda Walch
Andrea Bersamin
Philip Loring
Rhonda Johnson
Melissa Tholl
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2018 Dec;77(1):1419678
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Food insecurity is a public health concern. Food security includes the pillars of food access, availability and utilisation. For some indigenous peoples, this may also include traditional foods. To conduct a scoping review on traditional foods and food security in Alaska. Google Scholar and the High North Research Documents were used to search for relevant primary research using the following terms: "traditional foods", "food security", "access", "availability", "utilisation", "Alaska", "Alaska Native" and "indigenous". Twenty four articles from Google Scholar and four articles from the High North Research Documents were selected. The articles revealed three types of research approaches, those that quantified traditional food intake (n=18), those that quantified food security (n=2), and qualitative articles that addressed at least one pillar of food security (n=8). Limited primary research is available on food security in Alaskan. Few studies directly measure food security while most provide a review of food security factors. Research investigating dietary intake of traditional foods is more prevalent, though many differences exist among participant age groups and geographical areas. Future research should include direct measurements of traditional food intake and food security to provide a more complete picture of traditional food security in Alaska.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29292675 View in PubMed
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