Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

All-cause mortality in 272,186 patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation 1995-2008: a Swedish nationwide long-term case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117233
Source
Eur Heart J. 2013 Apr;34(14):1061-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Tommy Andersson
Anders Magnuson
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Ole Frøbert
Karin M Henriksson
Nils Edvardsson
Dritan Poçi
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, 701 85 Örebro, Sweden. tommy.andersson@orebroll.se
Source
Eur Heart J. 2013 Apr;34(14):1061-7
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - mortality
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate long-term all-cause risk of mortality in women and men hospitalized for the first time with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with matched controls.
A total of 272 186 patients (44% women) = 85 years at the time of hospitalization with incidental AF 1995-2008 and 544 344 matched controls free of in-hospital diagnosis of AF were identified. Patients were followed via record linkage of the Swedish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. Using Cox regression models, the long-term relative all-cause mortality risk, adjusted for concomitant diseases, in women vs. controls was 2.15, 1.72, and 1.44 (P
Notes
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1999 Nov;20(21):1592-910529328
Cites: Am J Med. 2002 Oct 1;113(5):365-7012401530
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jun 13;285(22):2864-7011401607
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Oct;33(20):2569-61922922416
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(14):1787-84722611136
Cites: BMJ. 2012;344:e352222653980
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Apr 19;123(15):1587-9321464054
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;25(2):95-10219936945
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 Feb 23;55(8):725-3120170808
Cites: Chest. 2010 Feb;137(2):263-7219762550
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Feb 12;360(7):668-7819213680
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Jun 19;146(12):857-6717577005
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Aug;27(16):1954-6416847008
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Jul 11;114(2):119-2516818816
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Apr 10;166(7):719-2816606807
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Apr;27(8):949-5316527828
Cites: Stroke. 2006 Feb;37(2):577-61716432246
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Nov 1;46(9):1729-3616256877
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2005 Aug 3;103(1):78-8415922465
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Mar 1;45(5):705-1115734614
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Sep 8;98(10):946-529737513
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Feb 9;158(3):229-349472202
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2002 Oct;4(5):571-512413498
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 2013 Apr;34(14):1027-3023407094
PubMed ID
23321349 View in PubMed
Less detail

Angiographic morphology impacts outcomes in STEMI patients with LAD occlusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143251
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan 1;77(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2011
Author
Karin Arinell
Johan Josefsson
Anders Magnuson
Ole Fröbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jan 1;77(1):29-34
Date
Jan-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - mortality
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Occlusion - complications - mortality - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality - radiography - therapy
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Acute proximal occlusion of the left anterior descendent coronary artery (LAD) is a critical medical condition often leading to heart failure and death. Our objective was to investigate how additional angiographic findings might influence prognosis.
In a single center setting by using consecutive data from the Swedish angiography and angioplasty registry (SCAAR), we identified all patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) related to the proximal LAD referred for primary coronary angioplasty. Clinical and angiographic data were collected from January 2004 to December 2008.
In the study period, 359 patients (mean age 67.9 ± 12.3 years, 111 women) were identified as having proximal LAD-related culprit lesion. Follow-up was up to 5.5 years. Compared to patients with LAD occlusion only, having both a small conus branch (
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Jun 1;77(7):108621452225
PubMed ID
20506285 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barrier pressure of the oesophagogastric junction during propofol induction with and without alfentanil: a double-blind, randomised, crossover study in volunteers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129051
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2012 Jan;29(1):28-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Rebecca Ahlstrand
Sven-Egron Thörn
Anette Dahlkvist
Magnus Wattwil
Anders Magnuson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Örebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. rebecca.ahlstrand@orebroll.se
Source
Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2012 Jan;29(1):28-34
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alfentanil - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Analysis of Variance
Anesthetics, Intravenous - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Esophagogastric Junction - drug effects
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Manometry
Pressure
Propofol - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Respiratory Aspiration - etiology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Practice varies regarding the use of opioids during rapid sequence induction. Controversy exists as to whether opioids may increase the risk of pulmonary aspiration by decreasing the barrier pressure (lower oesophageal sphincter-intragastric pressure).
To evaluate the effects of adding alfentanil during anaesthesia induction with propofol with respect to the barrier pressure in the oesophagogastric junction.
Seventeen healthy volunteers (11 men and six women) participated in a double-blind, randomised, crossover trial at the University Hospital in Orebro, Sweden.
The volunteers were anaesthetised on two different occasions, randomly assigned to receive either alfentanil 20 µg kg(-1) or an equivalent amount of isotonic saline, administered intravenously, 1 min before induction with propofol 2 mg kg(-1). One minute after propofol administration, a cricoid pressure of 30 N was applied. The primary outcome was the difference in the change in barrier pressure between the alfentanil and the placebo occasion 1 min after propofol administration. The secondary outcomes were differences in the changes in barrier pressure 1 min after alfentanil or placebo administration and during ongoing cricoid pressure application.
There were no statistically significant differences in barrier pressure, at any time point, between anaesthesia induction with alfentanil and propofol compared with induction with placebo and propofol. The barrier pressure never decreased to less than 2.4 mmHg in any volunteer.
Our study showed no increased risk regarding the integrity of the gastro-oesophageal junction when alfentanil is added during an induction with propofol in volunteers. This supports the practice of adding opioids as adjuvants during rapid sequence induction.
PubMed ID
22146614 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence among Swedish pulp and paper mill workers: a cohort study of sulphate and sulphite mills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123949
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):529-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Eva Andersson
Håkan Westberg
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Anders Magnuson
Bodil Persson
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Box 414, SE 405 30, Göteborg, Sweden. eva.andersson@amm.gu.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2013 Jul;86(5):529-40
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carcinogens
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Paper
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sulfates - adverse effects
Sulfites - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Associations between various malignancies and work in the pulp and paper industry have been reported but mostly in analyses of mortality rather than incidence. We aimed to study cancer incidence by main mill pulping process, department and gender in a Swedish cohort of pulp and paper mill workers.
The cohort (18,113 males and 2,292 females, enrolled from 1939 to 1999 with >1 year of employment) was followed up for cancer incidence from 1958 to 2001. Information on the workers' department and employment was obtained from the mills' personnel files, and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated using the Swedish population as reference.
Overall cancer incidence, in total 2,488 cases, was not increased by work in any department. However, risks of pleural mesothelioma were increased among males employed in sulphate pulping (SIR, 8.38; 95 % CI, 3.37-17) and maintenance (SIR, 6.35; 95 % CI, 3.47-11), with no corresponding increase of lung cancer. Testicular cancer risks were increased among males employed in sulphate pulping (SIR, 4.14; 95 % CI, 1.99-7.61) and sulphite pulping (SIR, 2.59; 95 % CI, 0.95-5.64). Female paper production workers showed increased risk of skin tumours other than malignant melanoma (SIR, 2.92; 95 % CI, 1.18-6.02).
Incidence of pleural mesothelioma was increased in the cohort, showing that asbestos exposure still has severe health consequences, and highlighting the exigency of strict asbestos regulations and elimination. Testicular cancer was increased among pulping department workers. Shift work and endocrine disruptors could be of interest in this context.
PubMed ID
22644408 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in Sweden - a stepped wedge national cluster randomised controlled trial - the CDC4G study protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308385
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Nov 01; 19(1):398
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Nov-01-2019
Author
Helena Fadl
Maryam Saeedi
Scott Montgomery
Anders Magnuson
Erik Schwarcz
Kerstin Berntorp
Verena Sengpiel
Elisabeth Storck-Lindholm
Helena Strevens
Anna-Karin Wikström
Sophia Brismar-Wendel
Martina Persson
Stefan Jansson
Fredrik Ahlsson
Carina Ursing
Linda Ryen
Kerstin Petersson
Ulla-Britt Wennerholm
Karin Hildén
David Simmons
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. Helena.fadl@regionorebrolan.se.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2019 Nov 01; 19(1):398
Date
Nov-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Diabetes, Gestational - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Diagnosis - standards
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
The optimal criteria to diagnose gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) remain contested. The Swedish National Board of Health introduced the 2013 WHO criteria in 2015 as a recommendation for initiation of treatment for hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. With variation in GDM screening and diagnostic practice across the country, it was agreed that the shift to new guidelines should be in a scientific and structured way. The aim of the Changing Diagnostic Criteria for Gestational Diabetes (CDC4G) in Sweden ( www.cdc4g.se/en ) is to evaluate the clinical and health economic impacts of changing diagnostic criteria for GDM in Sweden and to create a prospective cohort to compare the many long-term outcomes in mother and baby under the old and new diagnostic approaches.
This is a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial, comparing pregnancy outcomes before and after the switch in GDM criteria across 11 centres in a randomised manner. The trial includes all pregnant women screened for GDM across the participating centres during January-December 2018, approximately two thirds of all pregnancies in Sweden in a year. Women with pre-existing diabetes will be excluded. Data will be collected through the national Swedish Pregnancy register and for follow up studies other health registers will be included.
The stepped wedge RCT was chosen to be the best study design for evaluating the shift from old to new diagnostic criteria of GDM in Sweden. The national quality registers provide data on the whole pregnant population and gives a possibility for follow up studies of both mother and child. The health economic analysis from the study will give a solid evidence base for future changes in order to improve immediate pregnancy, as well as long term, outcomes for mother and child.
CDC4G is listed on the ISRCTN registry with study ID ISRCTN41918550 (15/12/2017).
PubMed ID
31675922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical implications of assay specific differences in f-calprotectin when monitoring inflammatory bowel disease activity over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285710
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Mar;52(3):344-350
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Karin Amcoff
Mats Stridsberg
Maria Lampinen
Anders Magnuson
Marie Carlson
Jonas Halfvarson
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2017 Mar;52(3):344-350
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - analysis
Colonoscopy
Disease Progression
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - chemistry
Female
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - classification - metabolism
Intestinal Mucosa - metabolism
Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Abstract
With several faecal calprotectin (FC) assays on the market, it has been difficult to define a uniform threshold for discriminating between remission and active disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We aimed to compare the results of different FC-assays in IBD patients, followed over time.
IBD patients provided faecal samples and reported clinical activity every third month prospectively over a two year period. FC was measured with two ELISA - (Bühlmann and Immunodiagnostik) and one automated fluoroimmunoassay (Phadia).
In total, 13 patients provided 91 faecal samples. The median (IQR) concentration of FC was higher at active disease than at remission for all assays: Bühlmann 845 (1061-226) µg/g versus 62 (224-39) µg/g, Phadia 369 (975-122) µg/g versus 11 (52-11) µg/g, and Immundiagnostik 135 (302-69) µg/g versus 8 (56-4) µg/g. The Bühlmann assay produced the largest absolute difference but the corresponding relative difference seemed to be more pronounced when analysed by the Phadia - (ratio of means 8.5; 95% CI 3.3-21.9) or the Immundiagnostik assay (ratio of means 7.4; 95% CI 3.1-17.6) than by the Bühlmann assay (ratio of means 5.3; 95% CI 2.7-10.6). Consequently, the specificity for discriminating active disease from remission varied between assays (34-75%) when the cut-off 50?µg/g was used, whereas the differences in sensitivity were less pronounced.
Cross-comparisons revealed overall poor agreement between the assays as well as differences in the dynamics of FC. These findings suggest that standardisation of the method is needed to implement FC as a disease monitoring tool at large-scale.
PubMed ID
27881032 View in PubMed
Less detail

Closure of mesenteric defects in laparoscopic gastric bypass: a multicentre, randomised, parallel, open-label trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273128
Source
Lancet. 2016 Apr 2;387(10026):1397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2016
Author
Erik Stenberg
Eva Szabo
Göran Ågren
Johan Ottosson
Richard Marsk
Hans Lönroth
Lars Boman
Anders Magnuson
Anders Thorell
Ingmar Näslund
Source
Lancet. 2016 Apr 2;387(10026):1397-404
Date
Apr-2-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Gastric Bypass - adverse effects
Hernia, Abdominal - epidemiology
Humans
Intestinal Obstruction - epidemiology - surgery
Jejunostomy
Jejunum - surgery
Laparoscopy - adverse effects
Male
Mesentery - injuries - surgery
Middle Aged
Operative Time
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Wound Closure Techniques
Abstract
Small bowel obstruction due to internal hernia is a common and potentially serious complication after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Whether closure of surgically created mesenteric defects might reduce the incidence is unknown, so we did a large randomised trial to investigate.
This study was a multicentre, randomised trial with a two-arm, parallel design done at 12 centres for bariatric surgery in Sweden. Patients planned for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery at any of the participating centres were offered inclusion. During the operation, a concealed envelope was opened and the patient was randomly assigned to either closure of mesenteric defects beneath the jejunojejunostomy and at Petersen's space or non-closure. After surgery, assignment was open label. The main outcomes were reoperation for small bowel obstruction and severe postoperative complications. Outcome data and safety were analysed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01137201.
Between May 1, 2010, and Nov 14, 2011, 2507 patients were recruited to the study and randomly assigned to closure of the mesenteric defects (n=1259) or non-closure (n=1248). 2503 (99·8%) patients had follow-up for severe postoperative complications at day 30 and 2482 (99·0%) patients had follow-up for reoperation due to small bowel obstruction at 25 months. At 3 years after surgery, the cumulative incidence of reoperation because of small bowel obstruction was significantly reduced in the closure group (cumulative probability 0·055 for closure vs 0·102 for non-closure, hazard ratio 0·56, 95% CI 0·41-0·76, p=0·0002). Closure of mesenteric defects increased the risk for severe postoperative complications (54 [4·3%] for closure vs 35 [2·8%] for non-closure, odds ratio 1·55, 95% CI 1·01-2·39, p=0·044), mainly because of kinking of the jejunojejunostomy.
The results of our study support the routine closure of the mesenteric defects in laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. However, closure of the mesenteric defects might be associated with increased risk of early small bowel obstruction caused by kinking of the jejunojejunostomy.
Örebro County Council, Stockholm City Council, and the Erling-Persson Family Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2016 Apr 2;387(10026):1351-226895676
PubMed ID
26895675 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emergence of the new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis in a defined area of Sweden before 2002?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140421
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Oct;86(5):337-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Margaretha Jurstrand
Per Olcén
Anders Magnuson
Lena Jakobsson
Hans Fredlund
Magnus Unemo
Author Affiliation
Clinical Research Centre, Orebro University Hospital, Orebro, Sweden. margareta.jurstrand@orebroll.se
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2010 Oct;86(5):337-41
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cell Culture Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - classification - isolation & purification
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
To compare the proportions of Chlamydia trachomatis-positive specimens detected by Cobas Amplicor CT/NG (CA PCR) with C trachomatis positives in cell culture from 1999 to 2006 in order to estimate when the new variant of C trachomatis (nvCT) with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid (in the target region for CA PCR that resulted in false-negative results) emerged in Örebro County, Sweden.
The annual number of specimens analysed using CA PCR in 1999-2006 ranged from 5077 to 11,622 and using cell culture (McCoy cells) from 5201 to 7425. Logistic regression was applied to evaluate the change in the proportion of C trachomatis-positive tests over the years between the two methods. The statistical interaction effect of year and method was estimated using both unadjusted and adjusted (age, gender and clinic) models.
From 2002, the proportion of C trachomatis-positive specimens identified using CA PCR decreased annually, whereas the proportion of culture-positive specimens increased annually. Logistic regression showed a statistically significant interaction effect between periods (1999-2006) and groups of specimens analysed using CA PCR or cell culture. A statistically significant association between the interaction of CA PCR/cell culture and period was observed in the unadjusted and adjusted models.
This study indicates that in Orebro County, Sweden, nvCT was already present before 2002, that is, when the difference between the proportions of C trachomatis-positive specimens identified by CA PCR compared with cell culture-positive specimens began to show a statistically significant decline.
PubMed ID
20876752 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gender-related differences in risk of cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients hospitalized with incident atrial fibrillation without concomitant diseases: a nationwide cohort study of 9519 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265774
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Nov 15;177(1):91-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2014
Author
Tommy Andersson
Anders Magnuson
Ing-Liss Bryngelsson
Ole Frøbert
Karin M Henriksson
Nils Edvardsson
Dritan Poçi
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2014 Nov 15;177(1):91-9
Date
Nov-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity - trends
Population Surveillance
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies of patients with "lone" and "idiopathic" atrial fibrillation (AF) have provided conflicting evidence concerning the development, management and prognosis of this condition.
In this nation-wide, retrospective, cohort study, we studied patients diagnosed with incidental AF recorded in national Swedish registries between 1995 and 2008. Controls were matched for age, sex and calendar year of the diagnosis of AF in patients. All subjects were free of any in-hospital diagnosis from 1987 and until patients were diagnosed with AF and also free of any diagnosis within one year from the time of inclusion. Follow-up continued until 2009. We identified 9519 patients (31% women) and 12,468 matched controls.
Relative risks (RR) versus controls for stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) in women were 19.6, 4.4, 3.4 and 2.5 in the age categories
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cardiol. 2014 Dec 20;177(3):734-525449498
Comment In: Int J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 1;184:321-225731849
PubMed ID
25499348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interventions for lifestyle changes to promote weight reduction, a randomized controlled trial in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261483
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:213
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Stefan Po Jansson
Peter Engfeldt
Anders Magnuson
Georg Lohse Pt
Göran Liljegren
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2013;6:213
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - therapy
Primary Health Care
Sweden
Weight Loss
Young Adult
Abstract
Overweight and obesity are growing public health problems in high income countries and is now growing at a dramatic pace in low and middle income countries, particularly in urban settings. The aim of this trial was to examine the effects of a weight reduction program in adults and to determine whether or not a more extensive intervention was superior to ordinary care.
Patients seeking advice for overweight/obesity or illness related to overweight/obesity at eight primary health care centers in Sweden were randomized either to intervention or control care groups with both groups given dietary advice and individualized information on increased regular physical activity. In the intervention group advice was more extensive and follow-up more frequent than in the control group during the study period of two years. Main outcome measure was reduction in body weight of five percent or more from study start.
From October 2004 to April 2006, 133 patients, 67 in the intervention group and 66 in the control group, were randomized over a period of 18 months. Target weight was achieved at 12 months by 26.7% of the patients in the intervention group compared with 18.4% in the control group (p?=?0.335). There was an average absolute weight loss of 2.5 kg in the intervention group and 0.8 kg in the control group at 12 months as compared with the weight at study entry. There were no significant differences between the groups in quality of life, blood glucose and lipids. At 24 months target weight was achieved in 21.9% versus 15.6%, with an average weight reduction of 1.9 kg and 1.2 kg in the two groups, respectively.
Promotion of a diet with limited energy intake, appropriate composition of food and increased physical activity had limited effects on body weight in a Swedish primary care setting. More extensive advice and more frequent visits made no significant difference to the outcome.
ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01606917.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):741-5217715408
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2006 Sep;29(9):2102-716936160
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Sep;24 Suppl D:25D-31D18787733
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:8819320986
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(4):e519519365563
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2009 May;59(562):e157-6619401009
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 Jun;37(4):434-4219181821
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2010 Apr;18(4):725-3519696752
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2010 May;64(6):775-8320353431
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2010 Oct;110(10):1511-22, 1522.e1-320869490
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2011 Jul;41(1):33-4221665061
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:43421645343
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d650022053315
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Nov 24;365(21):1969-7922082239
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Nov 24;365(21):1959-6822085317
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Nov 24;365(21):2030-122085319
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(2):e3015322347368
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Oct 17;308(15):151423073936
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2009 Sep;24(9):1073-919562419
Cites: Arch Fam Med. 2000 May;9(5):426-3310810947
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Sep;32(9 Suppl):S498-50410993420
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 3;344(18):1343-5011333990
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 1;366(9492):1197-20916198769
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Oct;107(10):1755-6717904936
PubMed ID
23711165 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.