Skip header and navigation

Refine By

27 records – page 1 of 3.

Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289925
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Roma Runeson-Broberg
Jean-Baptist du Prel
Peter Westerholm
Maria Nordin
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Göran Fahlén
Richard Peter
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupational Stress - psychology
Reward
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workload - psychology
Abstract
In aging societies, zest for work may be pivotal when deciding to stay occupationally active longer. Psychosocial work stress is a prevalent public health problem and may have an impact on zest for work. Work over-commitment (WOC) is a personal coping strategy for work stress with excessive striving and a health risk. However, the long-term effect of WOC on zest for work is poorly understood.
To investigate the age-related associations of work over-commitment with zest for work.
During 1996-1998 and 2000-2003, predominantly industrial workers (n?=?2940) participated in the WOLF-Norrland study and responded to a questionnaire referring to socio-demographics, WOC, zest for work, effort-reward imbalance proxies, and mental health. Age-adjusted multiple logistic regressions were performed with original and imputed datasets.
Cross-sectionally, work overcommitted middle-aged employees had an increased prevalence of poor zest for work compared to their contemporaries without WOC (OR: 3.74 [95%-CI 2.19; 6.40]). However, in a longitudinal analysis associations between onset of 'poor zest for work' and the WOC subscales 'need for approval' (OR: 3.29 [95%-CI 1.04; 10.37]) and 'inability to withdraw from work' (OR: 5.14 [95%-CI 1.32; 20.03]) were observed.
The longitudinal findings among older employees could be relevant regarding the expected need to remain occupationally active longer.
PubMed ID
28582947 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Association between Job Strain and Atrial Fibrillation: Results from the Swedish WOLF Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275780
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:371905
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Eleonor I Fransson
Magdalena Stadin
Maria Nordin
Dan Malm
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Peter J M Westerholm
Source
Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:371905
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atrial Fibrillation - etiology
Cohort Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden
Work - physiology - psychology
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common heart rhythm disorder. Several life-style factors have been identified as risk factors for AF, but less is known about the impact of work-related stress. This study aims to evaluate the association between work-related stress, defined as job strain, and risk of AF.
Data from the Swedish WOLF study was used, comprising 10,121 working men and women. Job strain was measured by the demand-control model. Information on incident AF was derived from national registers. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between job strain and AF risk.
In total, 253 incident AF cases were identified during a total follow-up time of 132,387 person-years. Job strain was associated with AF risk in a time-dependent manner, with stronger association after 10.7 years of follow-up (HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.10-3.36 after 10.7 years, versus HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.83 before 10.7 years). The results pointed towards a dose-response relationship when taking accumulated exposure to job strain over time into account.
This study provides support to the hypothesis that work-related stress defined as job strain is linked to an increased risk of AF.
Notes
Cites: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Jun;9(6):360-7022473079
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
Cites: Europace. 2012 Oct;14(10):1385-41322923145
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Oct 27;380(9852):1491-722981903
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Dec 15;176(12):1078-8923144364
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2013 Apr;12(2):132-922936792
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2013 Feb;2(1):e00338423525409
Cites: Europace. 2013 Jun;15(6):781-623284141
Cites: BMJ. 2013;347:f474623929894
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e7054123950957
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2013 Sep 10;167(6):e182-323642829
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Jan;174(1):107-1424190540
Cites: Circulation. 2014 Feb 25;129(8):837-4724345399
Cites: J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2014 May-Jun;29(3):E1-1024108265
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):281-925034065
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):290-225034066
Cites: Circulation. 2014 Oct 7;130(15):1225-3525124494
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 2003 Mar-Apr;22(2):118-2312629277
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Aug;28(4):238-4812199425
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):177-8025523937
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2004 Aug 3;4:1315291967
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1998 Oct 16;82(8A):2N-9N9809895
Cites: Heart Rhythm. 2005 Jun;2(6):624-3115922271
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Apr;27(8):949-5316527828
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2006 Dec;32(6):431-4217173200
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jul 18;298(3):324-917635893
Cites: Europace. 2008 Jun;10(6):668-7318480076
Cites: Am Heart J. 2008 Jul;156(1):57-6418585497
Cites: J Cardiovasc Med (Hagerstown). 2008 Aug;9(8):794-818607243
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 May;30(9):1113-2019304990
Cites: Physiol Res. 2010;59(1):1-1219249911
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2010 Sep;35(1):115-2120026349
Cites: Cardiol J. 2010;17(5):437-4220865672
Cites: JAMA. 2001 May 9;285(18):2370-511343485
Cites: Circulation. 2002 Jun 11;105(23):2753-912057990
Cites: J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):431-4421743342
PubMed ID
26557661 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between occupational physical activity and myocardial infarction: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287340
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 10 03;6(10):e012692
Publication Type
Article
Date
10-03-2016
Author
Anna M Johnsen
Lars Alfredsson
Anders Knutsson
Peter J M Westerholm
Eleonor I Fransson
Source
BMJ Open. 2016 10 03;6(10):e012692
Date
10-03-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupations
Posture
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Sweden
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
Recommendations regarding physical activity typically include both leisure time and occupational physical activity. However, the results from previous studies on occupational physical activity and the association with myocardial infarction have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate if occupational physical activity is associated with the risk of myocardial infarction.
Prospective cohort study.
Data from the Swedish Work, Lipids and Fibrinogen (WOLF) study was used, comprising 9961 employees (6849 men, 3112 women, mean age 42.7 years) having no history of myocardial infarction. The participants were categorised into 3 groups according to their level of occupational physical activity.
Data regarding incident myocardial infarction were obtained from the Swedish National Patient Register and the Cause of Death Register. Cox proportional hazard regression was used for estimation of HRs for different levels of occupational physical activity in relation to the risk of myocardial infarction.
During a mean follow-up of 13.1 years, 249 cases of incident myocardial infarction were identified. In analyses adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic status, participants standing and walking more than 50% of their working day had an HR of 1.13 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.54), compared with participants seated more than 50% of their working day. The corresponding HR for participants whose work included lifting or carrying was 0.86 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.24). Further adjustment did not alter the results. Stratified analyses resulted in a significantly decreased risk for young people whose work included lifting or carrying, HR 0.37 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.84), compared with younger persons who sat most of their working day.
No significant association between occupational physical activity and the risk of myocardial infarction was observed in the total group of employees in this study. Based on the results from this study, occupational physical activity in general does not seem to be enough for reducing the risk of myocardial infarction.
Notes
Cites: Ergonomics. 2005 Sep 15-Nov 15;48(11-14):1334-5116338704
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Feb 13;2(1):e00055622331387
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2012 Dec;19(4):403-8823093473
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011 Jun 09;11:45021658213
Cites: Curr Opin Cardiol. 2013 Sep;28(5):575-8323928923
Cites: J Phys Act Health. 2014 Jan;11(1):76-8423249722
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Feb;9(2):391-40722470299
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2013 Mar;28(3):241-723329153
Cites: Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2015 Dec;22(12):1601-825311002
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2008 Jun;15(3):247-5718525378
Cites: Indian J Occup Environ Med. 2009 Aug;13(2):77-920386623
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2197-22323245608
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Feb;33(4):452-6622238330
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2095-12823245604
Cites: Asia Pac J Public Health. 2014 Nov;26(6):604-1323343645
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):349-5520686737
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Sports Med. 2001 Feb;31(2):101-1411227978
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2016 Jan;42(1):43-5126649851
Cites: Epidemiology. 2004 Sep;15(5):573-8215308957
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2008 Jun;15(3):239-4618525377
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Jan 04;2(1):e00027922218719
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Aug;28(4):238-4812199425
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Feb;28(4):492-817242011
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2015 Mar;41(2):124-3925599524
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1991;17 Suppl 1:110-71792522
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Dec;35(6):466-7419851700
PubMed ID
27697879 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of Alcohol-Induced Loss of Consciousness and Overall Alcohol Consumption With Risk for Dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304855
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 01; 3(9):e2016084
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-01-2020
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Archana Singh-Manoux
G David Batty
Séverine Sabia
Andrew Sommerlad
Sarah Floud
Markus Jokela
Jussi Vahtera
May A Beydoun
Sakari B Suominen
Aki Koskinen
Ari Väänänen
Marcel Goldberg
Marie Zins
Lars Alfredsson
Peter J M Westerholm
Anders Knutsson
Solja T Nyberg
Pyry N Sipilä
Joni V Lindbohm
Jaana Pentti
Gill Livingston
Jane E Ferrie
Timo Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
Source
JAMA Netw Open. 2020 09 01; 3(9):e2016084
Date
09-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - classification - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Ethanol - analysis - classification
Female
Finland - epidemiology
France - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Unconsciousness - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
United Kingdom - epidemiology
Abstract
Evidence on alcohol consumption as a risk factor for dementia usually relates to overall consumption. The role of alcohol-induced loss of consciousness is uncertain.
To examine the risk of future dementia associated with overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-induced loss of consciousness in a population of current drinkers.
Seven cohort studies from the UK, France, Sweden, and Finland (IPD-Work consortium) including 131?415 participants were examined. At baseline (1986-2012), participants were aged 18 to 77 years, reported alcohol consumption, and were free of diagnosed dementia. Dementia was examined during a mean follow-up of 14.4 years (range, 12.3-30.1). Data analysis was conducted from November 17, 2019, to May 23, 2020.
Self-reported overall consumption and loss of consciousness due to alcohol consumption were assessed at baseline. Two thresholds were used to define heavy overall consumption: greater than 14 units (U) (UK definition) and greater than 21 U (US definition) per week.
Dementia and alcohol-related disorders to 2016 were ascertained from linked electronic health records.
Of the 131?415 participants (mean [SD] age, 43.0 [10.4] years; 80?344 [61.1%] women), 1081 individuals (0.8%) developed dementia. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard ratio (HR) was 1.16 (95% CI, 0.98-1.37) for consuming greater than 14 vs 1 to 14 U of alcohol per week and 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.48) for greater than 21 vs 1 to 21 U/wk. Of the 96?591 participants with data on loss of consciousness, 10?004 individuals (10.4%) reported having lost consciousness due to alcohol consumption in the past 12 months. The association between loss of consciousness and dementia was observed in men (HR, 2.86; 95% CI, 1.77-4.63) and women (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.34-3.25) during the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.78-4.15), after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.16-2.99), and for early-onset (
PubMed ID
32902651 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer among shift workers: results of the WOLF longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120412
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Mar 1;39(2):170-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Berndt Karlsson
Torbjörn Akerstedt
Eleonor I Fransson
Peter Westerholm
Hugo Westerlund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall. Sweden. Anders.Knutsson@miun.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Mar 1;39(2):170-7
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate whether shift work (with or without night work) is associated with increased risk of breast cancer.
The population consisted of 4036 women. Data were obtained from WOLF (Work, Lipids, and Fibrinogen), a longitudinal cohort study. Information about baseline characteristics was based on questionnaire responses and medical examination. Cancer incidence from baseline to follow-up was obtained from the national cancer registry. Two exposure groups were identified: shift work with and without night work. The group with day work only was used as the reference group in the analysis. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate relative risk.
In total, 94 women developed breast cancer during follow-up. The average follow-up time was 12.4 years. The hazard ratio for breast cancer was 1.23 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.70-2.17] for shifts without night work and 2.02 (95% CI 1.03-3.95) for shifts with night work. When including only women
PubMed ID
23007867 View in PubMed
Less detail

Case fatality of myocardial infarction among shift workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270062
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):599-605
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jonas Hermansson
Katja Gillander Gådin
Berndt Karlsson
Christina Reuterwall
Johan Hallqvist
Anders Knutsson
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Jul;88(5):599-605
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - mortality
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Sleep Disorders, Circadian Rhythm - complications
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Shift work has been associated with an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and more specifically myocardial infarction (MI). The majority of the studies that found a positive association between shift work and CVD have been based on incidence data. The results from studies on cardiovascular-related mortality among shift workers have shown little or no elevated mortality associated with shift work. None of the previous studies have analysed short-term mortality (case fatality) after MI. Therefore, we investigated whether shift work is associated with increased case fatality after MI compared with day workers.
Data on incident cases with first MI were obtained from case-control study conducted in two geographical sites in Sweden (Stockholm Heart Epidemiology Program and Västernorrland Heart Epidemiology Program), including 1,542 cases (1,147 men and 395 women) of MI with complete working time information and 65 years or younger. Case fatality was defined as death within 28 days of onset of MI. Risk estimates were calculated using logistic regression.
The crude odds ratios for case fatality among male shift workers were 1.63 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.12, 2.38] and 0.56 (95 % CI 0.26, 1.18) for female shift workers compared with day workers. Adjustments for established cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes type II and socio-economic status did not alter the results.
Shift work was associated with increased risk of case fatality among male shift workers after the first MI.
PubMed ID
25261317 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effort-reward imbalance, sleep disturbances and fatigue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171477
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 May;79(5):371-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Göran Fahlén
Anders Knutsson
Richard Peter
Torbjörn Akerstedt
Maria Nordin
Lars Alfredsson
Peter Westerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Science, Mid Sweden University, 851 70, Sundsvall, Sweden. goran.fahlen@miun.se
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 May;79(5):371-8
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Physical Exertion
Questionnaires
Reward
Sleep Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Stress, Psychological
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model in relation to disturbed sleep and fatigue.
The study population derived from a subset of the WOLF (WOrk, Lipids, Fibrinogen) cohort study of cardiovascular risk in a working population who replied to the ERI-questionnaire comprising 789 men and 214 women. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate the prevalence ratio (PR) for sleep disorders and fatigue in relation to the components of ERI.
As sleep disturbances and fatigue, based on literature, were defined to be represented by the uppermost quintile, 14% of the men and 23% of the women were affected by sleep disturbances while 14 and 26%, respectively, were affected by fatigue. Higher levels of exposure for the ERI components were associated with increased prevalence of sleep disturbances and fatigue. For men, the strongest association was seen between high overcommitment and fatigue (PR 5.77, 95% confidence interval 2.89-11.5). For women, high effort and sleep disturbances (PR 4.04, CI 1.53-10.7), high effort/reward ratio and sleep disturbances (PR 4.13, CI 1.62-10.5), and between low reward and fatigue (PR 4.36, CI 1.79-10.6) yielded the most obvious associations.
The present study adds sleep disturbances and fatigue to the list of adverse consequences of effort-reward imbalance.
PubMed ID
16362323 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interaction between Shift Work and Established Coronary Risk Factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302601
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2019 04; 10(2):57-65
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2019
Author
Jonas Hermansson
Henrik Bøggild
Johan Hallqvist
Bendt Karlsson
Anders Knutsson
Tohr Nilsson
Christina Reuterwall
Katja Gillander Gådin
Author Affiliation
Angered Hospital, Angered, Sweden. jonas.hermansson@vgregion.se.
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2019 04; 10(2):57-65
Date
04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Hypertriglyceridemia - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Shift Work Schedule - adverse effects
Sweden
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Shift work is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the causes have not yet been fully established. It has been proposed that the coronary risk factors are more hazardous for shift workers, resulting in a potential interaction effect with shift work.
To analyse interaction effects of work schedule and established risk factors for coronary artery disease on the risk of myocardial infarction.
This analysis was conducted in SHEEP/VHEEP, a case-control study conducted in two counties in Sweden, comprising all first-time cases of myocardial infarction among men and women 45-70 years of age with controls stratified by sex, age, and hospital catchment area, totalling to 4648 participants. Synergy index (SI) was used as the main outcome analysis method for interaction analysis.
There was an interaction effect between shift work and physical inactivity on the risk of myocardial infarction with SI of 2.05 (95% CI 1.07 to 3.92) for male shift workers. For female shift workers, interaction effects were found with high waist-hip ratio (SI 4.0, 95% CI 1.12 to 14.28) and elevated triglycerides (SI 5.69, 95% CI 1.67 to 19.38).
Shift work and some established coronary risk factors have significant interactions.
PubMed ID
31041922 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007 Dec;33(6):435-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Jonas Hermansson
Katja Gillander Gådin
Berndt Karlsson
Bernt Lindahl
Birgitta Stegmayr
Anders Knutsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Sundsvall, Sweden. hermansson-jonas@yahoo.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007 Dec;33(6):435-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain ischemia - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Abstract
This study analyzed the potential association between shift work and ischemic stroke.
The analysis was carried out using a nested case-control study consisting of 138 shift workers and 469 day workers from the register of the Northern Sweden Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases (MONICA) study and the Västerbotten Intervention Programme. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk estimate for day workers in a comparison with shift workers and the risk of ischemic stroke.
The crude odds ratio for shift workers' risk of experiencing an ischemic stroke was 1.0 (95% confidence interval 0.6-1.8) for both the men and the women. The risk estimates were consistent despite the introduction of several recognized risk factors for ischemic stroke in the logistic regression models.
In the present study, none of the findings indicated a higher risk of shift workers undergoing an ischemic stroke than day workers.
PubMed ID
18327511 View in PubMed
Less detail

Job strain and major risk factors for coronary heart disease among employed males and females in a Swedish study on work, lipids and fibrinogen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53675
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Aug;28(4):238-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Lars Alfredsson
Niklas Hammar
Eleonor Fransson
Ulf de Faire
Johan Hallqvist
Anders Knutsson
Tohr Nilsson
Töres Theorell
Peter Westerholm
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.alfredsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Aug;28(4):238-48
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cholesterol - blood - classification
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - psychology
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - psychology
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship of job strain (high psychological job demands and low decision latitude) to hypertension, serum lipids, and plasmafibrinogen. METHODS: The study population consisted of employed persons between the ages of 15 and 64 years in the counties of Stockholm, V?sternorrland, and J?mtland, Sweden. The data collection was carried out during 1992-1998. A total of 10,382 subjects participated in a medical examination and completed a questionnaire. RESULTS: No strong associations were found between job strain and plasma fibrinogen. The males reporting job strain had lower levels of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol than the other males. Similar tendencies were found for the females. The females, but not the males, with job strain had an increased prevalence of hypertension when compared with the subjects with relaxed psychosocial work characteristics. In the subgroups of younger males and females an adverse association between job strain and the ratio between low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was noted. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the hypothesis that job strain has an adverse impact on serum total cholesterol and plasma fibrinogen levels. They suggest that an increased risk of coronary heart disease in association with job strain, if causal, is mediated by other factors, possibly partly by hypertension and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
PubMed ID
12199425 View in PubMed
Less detail

27 records – page 1 of 3.