Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Symptoms as the main problem: a cross- sectional study of patient experience in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276948
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Mar 10;17:29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2016
Author
Marianne Rosendal
Anders Helles Carlsen
Mette Troellund Rask
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2016 Mar 10;17:29
Date
Mar-10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
General Practice - methods - standards
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Primary Health Care - methods - standards
Symptom Assessment - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
Symptoms are common in primary care. Besides providing thorough assessment of possible severe disease, the general practitioner (GP) must ensure good health care to all patients, irrespective of diagnoses. We aimed to explore patient satisfaction with the provided care and how well expectations in patients were met when no diagnosis was made during the consultation.
Cross-sectional study based on a questionnaire survey conducted in 2008-2009 among 377 GPs and their patients in the Central Denmark Region. A total of 2286 patients completed a questionnaire after the consultation (response rate: 54 %). The questionnaire included four satisfaction items from the EUROPEP instrument and a question about unmet expectations. For each patient, the GP answered a one-page registration form including information about the main problem in the consultation, chronic disorders and assessment of prognosis. Statistical analyses were adjusted for patient characteristics and GP clustering.
A higher proportion of patients reported illness worry (20 vs. 17 %, p-value: 0.005), unmet expectations (17 vs. 13 %, p-value: 0.019) and dissatisfaction with their GP after the consultation when no diagnosis was made. Dissatisfaction was primarily related to the medical examination (adjusted OR 1.30; 95 % CI: 1.06-1.60) and GP explanations (adjusted OR 1.40; 95 % CI: 1.14-1.71). Exploratory analyses revealed an association between dissatisfaction with examination and the GP assessment that symptoms were unrelated to biomedical disease. This association was found both in patients with 'symptoms only' and patients given a specific diagnosis.
GPs are challenged by patients presenting symptoms that do not fit the patterns of biomedical diagnoses. The current study demonstrates more illness worry, unmet expectations and dissatisfaction with the consultation in these patients compared to patients receiving a diagnosis. This trend is true for all patients assessed as having 'symptoms only' at the end of a consultation and not only for the minority group with 'medically unexplained symptoms'. As primary care is the frontline of the health-care system, symptoms are managed as the main problem in almost one in three consultations. It is about time that we take the same professional approach to symptoms as we have done for years to biomedical disease.
Notes
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2000 May-Jun;22(3):144-5210880707
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015 Jun;33(2):91-925961812
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2001 Feb;52(4):609-2011206657
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 1;134(9 Pt 2):889-9711346325
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 1;134(9 Pt 2):897-90411346326
Cites: Fam Pract. 2001 Oct;18(5):495-50011604370
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2002 Nov;17(11):817-2412406352
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Dec;53(497):917-2214960214
Cites: Q J Med. 1994 Mar;87(3):187-938208907
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1997 Jul 14;157(13):1482-89224227
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):50-59612880
Cites: Psychol Med. 1998 May;28(3):703-119626726
Cites: Pain. 1998 Jun;76(3):417-269718260
Cites: Cancer Prev Control. 1999 Feb;3(1):25-3010474749
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2005 Nov-Dec;67(6):897-90516314594
Cites: J Altern Complement Med. 2005;11 Suppl 1:S51-616332187
Cites: Fam Pract. 2006 Dec;23(6):609-1717035285
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2007;7:4617407605
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2007;8:3317540013
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2007 Jul-Aug;29(4):364-7317591514
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(3):174-8018759161
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:17818715502
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2009 Mar-Apr;7(2):112-2019273865
Cites: Med Care. 2011 Jul;49(7):611-721478782
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):70-522643150
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):43-923281962
Cites: Clin J Pain. 2013 Jun;29(6):512-723448866
Cites: J R Soc Med. 2015 Mar;108(3):84-825389231
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2000 Nov;50(460):882-711141874
PubMed ID
26965443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Symptoms as the main problem in primary care: A cross-sectional study of frequency and characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272053
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015 Jun;33(2):91-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marianne Rosendal
Anders Helles Carlsen
Mette Trøllund Rask
Grete Moth
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015 Jun;33(2):91-9
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Cough - diagnosis - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
General practice
General practitioners
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - etiology
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Symptom Assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim was to study symptoms managed as the main problem by the general practitioner (GP) and to describe the frequencies and characteristics of presented symptoms when no specific diagnosis could be made.
Cross- sectional study.
General practices in the Central Denmark Region.
In total, 397 GPs included patients with face-to-face contacts during one randomly assigned day in 2008-2009; 7008 patients were included and 5232 presented with a health problem.
GPs answered a questionnaire after each patient contact. Symptoms and specific diagnoses were subsequently classified using the International Classification of Primary Care (ICPC). Symptom frequency, comorbidity, consultation length, and GP-assessed final outcome and burden of consultations were analysed.
The GPs could not establish a specific diagnosis in 36% of patients with health problems. GPs expected that presented symptoms would not result in a future specific diagnosis for half of these patients. Musculoskeletal (lower limb and back) and respiratory (cough) symptoms were most frequent. More GPs had demanding consultations when no specific diagnosis could be made. Higher burden was associated with age, comorbidity, and GP expectancy of persistent symptoms when no diagnosis could be made.
Interpretation and management of symptoms is a key task in primary care. As symptoms are highly frequent in general practice, symptoms without a specific diagnosis constitute a challenge to GPs. Nevertheless, symptoms have been given little priority in research. More attention should be directed to evidence-based management of symptoms as a generic phenomenon to ensure improved outcomes in the future.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2005 Nov;20(11):1032-716307629
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Jan-Feb;37(1):53-925456975
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2007;8:5317854488
Cites: Fam Pract. 2008 Aug;25(4):266-7118596048
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2009 May;66(5):363-7719379952
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 May 1;134(9 Pt 2):897-90411346326
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Dec;53(497):914-514960212
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Dec;53(497):917-2214960214
Cites: Br Med J. 1974 Mar 30;1(5908):625-64821014
Cites: Am J Med. 1989 Mar;86(3):262-62919607
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1997 Mar;42(3):245-529130181
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1998 Mar;16(1):50-59612880
Cites: Fam Pract. 2009 Dec;26(6):455-6519825865
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2009 Dec;15(4):243-5020055723
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jan;61(582):e1-1121401979
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2011 Jun;17(2):87-9421599555
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2011 Jun;61(587):e316-2521801510
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):70-522643150
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Sep;30(3):147-5522817103
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):43-923281962
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):36-4223293843
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2013;14:4123522393
Cites: Patient Educ Couns. 2013 May;91(2):249-5423369375
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):373-8024072756
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;203(5):320-124187064
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:11824924564
Cites: CNS Spectr. 2006 Mar;11(3):190-20016575376
PubMed ID
25961812 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-cause mortality and pharmacological treatment intensity following a high risk screening program for diabetes. A 6.6 year follow-up of the ADDITION study, Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124294
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Oct;6(3):193-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Torsten Lauritzen
Annelli Sandbaek
Anders Helles Carlsen
Knut Borch-Johnsen
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, Department of General Practice, University of Aarhus, Denmark. tl@alm.au.dk
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Oct;6(3):193-200
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Comorbidity
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Dyslipidemias - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To study all-cause mortality and pharmacological treatment intensity in relation to baseline glucose metabolism and HbA1c following high risk screening for diabetes in primary care.
Persons aged 40-69 years (N=163,185) received mailed diabetes risk questionnaires. 20,916 persons without diabetes but with high risk of diabetes were stratified by glucose metabolism (normal glucose tolerance (NGT), dysglycemia (IFG or IGT) or diabetes) and by HbA1c at screening (
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Diabetes. 2012 Dec;6(4):341-222917774
PubMed ID
22595031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient characteristics and frequency of bodily distress syndrome in primary care: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278563
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Sep;65(638):e617-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Anna Budtz-Lilly
Mogens Vestergaard
Per Fink
Anders Helles Carlsen
Marianne Rosendal
Source
Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Sep;65(638):e617-23
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis
Attitude to Health
Checklist - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Depression - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Medically Unexplained Symptoms
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - methods
Quality of Life
Sickness Impact Profile
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Bodily distress syndrome (BDS) is a newly proposed diagnosis of medically unexplained symptoms, which is based on empirical research in primary care.
To estimate the frequency of BDS in primary care and describe the characteristics of patients with BDS.
A cross-sectional study of primary care patients in urban and rural areas of Central Denmark Region.
Data were obtained from GP one-page registration forms, patient questionnaires (including a checklist for BDS), and national registers.
A total of 1356 primary care patients were included, of whom 230 patients (17.0%, 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 15.0 to 19.1) fulfilled the BDS criteria. BDS was more common among primary care patients aged 41-65 years (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3 to 3.0) and was equally frequent among males and females (female sex, OR 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3). Patients with BDS were characterised by poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) on the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey, that is, physical component summary scores
Notes
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Jul;39(7):705-1511458135
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:40221619607
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2004 Apr;56(4):391-40815094023
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2004 Jun;184:470-615172939
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Sep 1;20(5):577-8315339329
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1992 Jul;36(5):439-471535658
Cites: Med Care. 1996 Mar;34(3):220-338628042
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Jan;95(1):6-129051154
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1997 Mar;42(3):245-529130181
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2005 May;162(5):847-5515863783
Cites: Fam Pract. 2005 Aug;22(4):448-5715814580
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;62(8):903-1016061768
Cites: Psychol Med. 2005 Aug;35(8):1175-8416116943
Cites: Aust N Z J Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;39(9):772-8116168035
Cites: Gastrointest Endosc. 2005 Dec;62(6):892-916301033
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2007 Jan;69(1):30-917244846
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2009 Sep;67(3):189-9719686874
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2010 May;68(5):415-2620403500
Cites: Fam Pract. 2008 Aug;25(4):266-7118596048
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):22-521775345
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):30-321775347
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):34-721775348
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):38-4121775349
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):54-721775352
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):12-621898916
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2012 Jun;200(6):499-50722539780
Cites: Fam Pract. 2013 Feb;30(1):76-8722843638
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2013 Mar;31(1):43-923281962
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2013 Aug;22(6):1353-6023054489
Cites: Mayo Clin Proc. 2014 Feb;89(2):199-20624485133
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2015 Jun;78(6):536-4525818346
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Dec;53(497):917-2214960214
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2007 Oct;27(7):781-9717822818
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2007 Dec;69(9):860-318040095
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Jan 5;336(7634):2-318174564
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 May-Jun;30(3):191-918433651
Erratum In: Br J Gen Pract. 2015 Oct;65(639):51226412818
PubMed ID
26324499 View in PubMed
Less detail

The prognosis of bodily distress syndrome: a cohort study in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275422
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Nov-Dec;37(6):560-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anna Budtz-Lilly
Mogens Vestergaard
Per Fink
Anders Helles Carlsen
Marianne Rosendal
Source
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015 Nov-Dec;37(6):560-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Checklist
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Prognosis
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Bodily distress syndrome (BDS) is a newly proposed diagnosis for functional disorders. The diagnosis is based on empirical research, but little is known about the course of the disease. We aimed to study the prognosis in terms of diagnosis stability over time.
A longitudinal study of 1356 primary care patients with 2-year follow-up was conducted in the Central Denmark Region. Data were obtained from family physician registration forms, patient questionnaires (including a BDS checklist) and nationwide registries. Complete data were available for 1001 patients (73.8%).
Overall, 146 persons [14.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 12.5-16.9] fulfilled the criteria for BDS at baseline and 142 persons (14.2%, CI: 12.1-16.5) at follow-up. Among study participants with BDS at baseline, 56.8% (CI: 48.4-65.0) also had BDS at follow-up. Multiorgan BDS tended to be more persistent (81.8%, CI: 48.2-97.7) than single-organ BDS (54.8%, CI: 46.0-63.4). Patients with BDS had fewer socioeconomic resources, experienced more emotional distress, and used more opioids and medical services.
BDS is a common clinical condition being prone to chronicity; one in seven primary care patients met the criteria for BDS, and more than half of these patients still suffered from BDS 2 years later.
PubMed ID
26371705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Measurement properties of the Danish version of the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer (ABC) measure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290244
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2017 Apr 26; 17(1):74
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-26-2017
Author
Line Hvidberg
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Christian Nielsen Wulff
Anders Helles Carlsen
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Cancer Diagnosis in Primary Care (CaP), Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. LINE.HVIDBERG@PH.AU.DK.
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2017 Apr 26; 17(1):74
Date
Apr-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - psychology
Psychometrics - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The International Cancer Benchmarking Partnership aims to study international differences in cancer survival and the possible causes. Participating countries are Australia, Canada, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and the UK and a particular focus area is differences in awareness and beliefs about cancer. In this connection, the Awareness and Beliefs about Cancer (ABC) measure has been translated into multiple languages. The aim of this study is to appraise the translation process and measurement properties of the Danish version of the ABC measure.
The translation process included forward and backward translations and a pilot-test. Data quality was assessed using survey data from 3000 Danish respondents and content validity indexes were calculated based on judgments from ten academic researchers. Construct validity was determined by a confirmative factor analysis (CFA) and exploratory factor analyses (EFA) using survey data and a known group comparison analysis including 56 persons. Test-retest reliability was assessed based on responses from 123 person whom completed the interview twice with an interval of 2-3 weeks.
The translation process resulted in a Danish ABC measure conceptually equivalent to the English ABC measure. Data quality was acceptable in relation to non-response to individual items which was maximum 0.3%, but the percentage of respondents answering 'don't know' was above 3% for 16 out of 48 items. Content validity indexes showed that items adequately reflected and represented the constructs to be measured (item content validity indexes: 0.9-1.0; construct content validity indexes: 0.8-1.0). The hypothesised factor structure could not be replicated by a CFA, but EFA on each individual subscale showed that six out of seven subscales were unidimensional. The ABC measure discriminated well between non-medical academics and medical academics, but had some difficulties in discriminating between educational groups. Test-retest reliability was moderate to substantial for most items.
The Danish ABC measure is a useful measurement that is accepted and understood by the target group and with accepted measurement criteria for content validity and test-retest reliability. Future studies may further explore the factorial structure of the ABC measure and should focus on improving the response categories.
Notes
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2011 Aug 23;11:366 PMID 21859500
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2007 Aug;30(4):459-67 PMID 17654487
Cites: J Fam Plann Reprod Health Care. 2012 Jul;38(3):167-74 PMID 21933805
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-42 PMID 17161752
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2009 Mar;45(5):827-36 PMID 19054666
Cites: Prev Med. 2003 May;36(5):525-35 PMID 12689797
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S18-23 PMID 19956158
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2014 Aug 09;14:581 PMID 25108301
Cites: Br J Psychol. 2004 May;95(Pt 2):219-34 PMID 15142303
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2009 Dec 3;101 Suppl 2:S13-7 PMID 19956157
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Feb;71:107-13 PMID 25524610
Cites: Ann Oncol. 2003;14 Suppl 5:v128-49 PMID 14684503
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2007 Sep;8(9):773-83 PMID 17714991
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2010 May;46(8):1374-81 PMID 20335018
Cites: Psychol Bull. 1979 Mar;86(2):420-8 PMID 18839484
Cites: Lancet. 2011 Jan 8;377(9760):127-38 PMID 21183212
Cites: Biometrics. 1977 Mar;33(1):159-74 PMID 843571
Cites: Nurs Res. 1986 Nov-Dec;35(6):382-5 PMID 3640358
Cites: BMJ Open. 2012 Dec 18;2(6):null PMID 23253874
Cites: Thorax. 2012 May;67(5):426-32 PMID 22426791
PubMed ID
28446140 View in PubMed
Less detail

Data quality and factor analysis of the Danish version of the Relationship Scale Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285664
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Christina Maar Andersen
Anette Fischer Pedersen
Anders Helles Carlsen
Frede Olesen
Peter Vedsted
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176810
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The Relationship Scale Questionnaire (RSQ) is a widely-used measure of adult attachment, but whether the results obtained by the RSQ fit the attachment construct has only been examined to a limited extent.
The objectives of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the Danish translation of the RSQ and to test whether the results are consistent with the hypothesized model of attachment.
The study included two samples: 602 general practitioners and 611 cancer patients. The two samples were analyzed separately. Data quality was assessed by mean, median and missing values for each item, floor and ceiling effects, average inter-item correlations and Cronbach's a for each subscale. Test-retest was assessed by intra-class correlations among 76 general practitioners. A confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to establish evidence of the four proposed subscales. Due to an inadequate fit of the model, data was randomly split into two equally sized subsamples and an exploratory factor analysis was conducted for all 30 items in the first subsample comprised of 286 cancer patients and 285 general practitioners. The EFA yielded a three-factor structure which was validated through a confirmatory factor analyses in a second subsample comprised of 278 cancer patients and 289 general practitioners.
The data quality of the RSQ was generally good, except low internal consistency and low to moderate test-retest reliability. The four subscales of the RSQ were not confirmed by the confirmatory factor analysis. An exploratory factor analysis suggested a three-factor solution for both general practitioners and patients, which accounted for 61.1% of the variance among general practitioners and 62.5% among patients. The new three-factor solution was verified in a confirmatory factor analyses.
The proposed four-factor model of the RSQ could not be confirmed in this study. Similar challenges have been found by other studies validating the RSQ. An alternative three-factor structure was found for the RSQ.
Notes
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2002 Sep;53(3):763-7312217450
Cites: Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2013 Jan 10;8:123302491
Cites: Addict Behav. 2004 Nov;29(8):1633-615451130
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Dec;81(6):703-721110703
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2003 Apr;44(2):141-5112778982
Cites: Psychooncology. 2009 Oct;18(10):1045-5219195009
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2001 Jan;158(1):29-3511136630
Cites: Pain. 2009 Jun;143(3):200-519345016
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2006 Jul;63(2):552-6216480807
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2007 Jan;60(1):34-4217161752
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1991 Aug;61(2):226-441920064
Cites: Psychol Psychother. 2009 Sep;82(Pt 3):267-7719288978
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 2010 Oct;69(4):419-3220846544
Cites: Neuroscience. 2012 Sep 18;220:149-5722732507
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2001 Jul-Aug;63(4):556-6711485109
Cites: Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2005 Aug;31(8):1026-3816000265
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Mar;33(3):539-4420007946
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1990 Apr;58(4):644-6314570079
Cites: Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2009;69(2):119-3219960862
Cites: J Pers Soc Psychol. 1987 Mar;52(3):511-243572722
Cites: Clin Psychol Rev. 2008 Mar;28(3):407-2917719157
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2002 Jul-Aug;64(4):660-712140356
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2009;44(1):99-11419137485
Cites: Scand J Psychol. 2011 Jun;52(3):268-7621244436
Cites: Int J Family Med. 2013;2013:60371324383000
Cites: Hum Brain Mapp. 2009 Nov;30(11):3553-6219347874
Cites: Eur J Psychotraumatol. 2011;2:null22893825
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):30-321775347
Cites: Aust Occup Ther J. 2008 Dec;55(4):29720887486
Cites: Psicothema. 2013;25(2):275-8123628545
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2008 Mar-Apr;30(2):104-1118291292
PubMed ID
28472074 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.