Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

Assessment of left ventricular function by GPs using pocket-sized ultrasound.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127002
Source
Fam Pract. 2012 Oct;29(5):534-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Ole Christian Mjølstad
Sten Roar Snare
Lasse Folkvord
Frode Helland
Anders Grimsmo
Hans Torp
Olav Haraldseth
Bjørn Olav Haugen
Author Affiliation
MI Laboratory, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim, Norway. ole.c.mjolstad@ntnu.no
Source
Fam Pract. 2012 Oct;29(5):534-40
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Echocardiography - instrumentation
Equipment Design
Feasibility Studies
Female
General Practice - instrumentation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Primary Health Care
Ultrasonography - instrumentation
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - ultrasonography
Abstract
Assessment of left ventricular (LV) function with echocardiography is mandatory in patients with suspected heart failure (HF).
To investigate if GPs were able to evaluate the LV function in patients at risk of developing or with established HF by using pocket-sized ultrasound (pUS).
Feasibility study in general practice, seven GPs in three different Norwegian primary care centres participated. Ninety-two patients with reduced or at risk of developing reduced LV function were examined by their own GP using pUS. The scan (
Notes
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2002 Jun;4(3):361-7112034163
Cites: Fam Pract. 2011 Apr;28(2):128-3320978242
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Feb 8;1(8476):307-102868172
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Feb 10;261(6):884-82913385
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1991 Jan 15;67(2):222-41987731
Cites: J Intern Med. 1990 Dec;228(6):569-752280234
Cites: Eur Heart J. 1992 Feb;13(2):194-2001555616
Cites: Clin Physiol. 1992 Jul;12(4):443-521505166
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2005 Mar;18(3):257-6315746716
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2005 Dec;18(12):1440-6316376782
Cites: Eur J Echocardiogr. 2006 Jun;7(3):187-9816046188
Cites: Echocardiography. 2006 Nov;23(10):846-5217069603
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2007 Oct;33(10):1795-917572874
Cites: Heart. 2008 Mar;94(3):284-917575333
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Jul;29(14):1739-5218506054
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Oct;29(19):2388-44218799522
Cites: J Hosp Med. 2009 Jul;4(6):340-919670355
Cites: Heart Fail Rev. 2010 Jan;15(1):23-3719484381
Cites: Eur J Echocardiogr. 2010 Mar;11(2):149-5619959533
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2010 May;23(5):511-520356710
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2011 Feb;24(2):111-621126857
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2011 Feb;24(2):125-3121281907
Cites: Eur J Echocardiogr. 2011 Feb;12(2):85-721216764
Cites: Ultrasound Med Biol. 2011 Apr;37(4):617-3121371809
Cites: Fam Pract. 2003 Oct;20(5):570-414507800
PubMed ID
22333323 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Emerg Med J. 2013 Sep;30(9):707-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Borge Lillebo
Bodil Dyrstad
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Out-of-Hours Primary Care Centre, Varnesregionen, Stjørdal, Norway. borge.lillebo@varnesregionen.no
Source
Emerg Med J. 2013 Sep;30(9):707-11
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
After-Hours Care - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Use of specialist healthcare services is increasing.
To evaluate whether alternative healthcare services could reduce the need for admissions to specialist care hospitals.
Prospective observational study of emergency referrals for admission to specialist care.
A single out-of-hours primary care centre (OPCC) in Norway.
Out-of-hours physicians registered their referrals for hospital admission and stated whether the admission could have been avoided given the availability of six other healthcare services.
Of 1083 registered encounters at the OPCC, 152 (14%) were referred for specialist care hospital admission. According to the referring physician, 32 (21%) of these referrals could have been avoided. The most eligible alternatives to such referrals were next-day appointments at a specialist outpatient clinic (11 of 32 referrals), or admission to a community hospital (21 of 32 referrals), or a nursing home (nine of 32 referrals). Respiratory (eight of 32 referrals) and gastrointestinal problems (12 of 32 referrals) were the most common among avoidable admissions.
The use of specialist care hospital admission can be reduced if appropriate alternatives are available.
PubMed ID
22983980 View in PubMed
Less detail

Closing information gaps with shared electronic patient summaries: how much will it matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130907
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2011 Nov;80(11):775-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Vebjørn Mack Remen
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Electronic Patient Record Research Center, Norwegian University of Technology and Science, Trondheim, Norway. vebjornmackremen@mac.com
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2011 Nov;80(11):775-81
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records - standards
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Norway
Abstract
Information deficits contribute to medical errors. Hence several efforts to develop electronic communication systems to facilitate a flow of information between health care providers have been attempted, including initiatives to develop regional or national electronic patient summaries.
To study information access and information needs in inpatient emergency departments, and how clinicians in these departments handle deficits in available information.
We conducted an observational study of consecutive unplanned inpatient admissions using a structured form to register a set of predefined parameters and free-text notes, including a post-examination interview with the examining emergency department doctors and nurses.
We observed 177 patient admissions, excluding any patients under 18 years of age and planned admissions. One in four patients arrived without any referral. Nearly all referrals described the presenting complaint with a tentative diagnosis. One third of the referrals lacked medication record and medical history. Only one in ten referrals contained information about contraindications. If the patient had previously been admitted to the hospital, the emergency department doctors used the existing electronic patient record and seemed to favor previous discharge letters as an information source. Information on current medications was often copied from earlier admissions. In half of the cases the patients also provided supplementary information in other ways not available, though one in five patients was not in a cognitive state to be properly interviewed. The examining doctors reported a lack of crucial information in 10% of the observed referrals.
Overall, information about medications and previous history was described in most referrals, but was still the information most frequently inquired or searched for. Qualitative assessments revealed that insufficient information put a significant stress on both patients and staff, and in turn caused additional workload and risky work-arounds. In our assessment, these information deficits could be effectively mitigated by an up to date easy-access patient summary.
PubMed ID
21956001 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Common computerized medical records and professional secrecy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190298
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 28;122(6):592
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2002
Author
Anders Grimsmo
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 28;122(6):592
Date
Feb-28-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confidentiality
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Norway
PubMed ID
11998708 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a patient-centred care pathway across healthcare providers: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115074
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:121
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Tove Røsstad
Helge Garåsen
Aslak Steinsbekk
Olav Sletvold
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. tove.rosstad@ntnu.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:121
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Critical Pathways
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - methods - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Hospital Administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Organizational Culture
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - manpower - organization & administration
Program Development
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Regional Medical Programs
Abstract
Different models for care pathways involving both specialist and primary care have been developed to ensure adequate follow-up after discharge. These care pathways have mainly been developed and run by specialist care and have been disease-based. In this study, primary care providers took the initiative to develop a model for integrated care pathways across care levels for older patients in need of home care services after discharge. Initially, the objective was to develop pathways for patients diagnosed with heart failure, COPD and stroke. The aim of this paper is to investigate the process and the experiences of the participants in this developmental work. The participants were drawn from three hospitals, six municipalities and patient organizations in Central Norway.
This qualitative study used focus group interviews, written material and observations. Representatives from the hospitals, municipalities and patient organizations taking part in the development process were chosen as informants.
The development process was very challenging because of the differing perspectives on care and different organizational structures in specialist care and primary care. In this study, the disease perspective, being dominant in specialist care, was not found to be suitable for use in primary health care because of the need to cover a broader perspective including the patient's functioning, social situation and his or her preferences. Furthermore, managing several different disease-based care pathways was found to be unsuitable in home care services, as well as unsuitable for a population characterized by a substantial degree of comorbidity. The outcome of the development process was a consensus that outlined a single, common patient-centred care pathway for transition from hospital to follow-up in primary care. The pathway was suitable for most common diseases and included functional and social aspects as well as disease follow-up, thus merging the differing perspectives. The disease-based care pathways were kept for use within the hospitals.
Disease-based care pathways for older patients were found to be neither feasible nor sustainable in primary care. A common patient-centred care pathway that could meet the needs of multi- morbid patients was recommended.
Notes
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010;10:120044945
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;7(4):293-919597165
Cites: Age Ageing. 2010 Jul;39(4):488-9420511245
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Sep;28(3):146-5320429738
Cites: Issue Brief (Commonw Fund). 2010 Nov;103:1-1221053533
Cites: BMJ. 2012;345:e445122797845
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Sep 13;284(10):1299-30110980760
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Aug 11;358(9280):483-811513933
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Sep 15;323(7313):625-811557716
Cites: Age Ageing. 2002 Mar;31(2):107-1712033184
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Oct 16;288(15):1909-1412377092
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Nov 11;162(20):2269-7612418941
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2003 Aug;18(8):646-5112911647
Cites: Stroke. 2003 Nov;34(11):2687-9114576376
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 May;52(5):675-8415086645
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2004 Oct 5;141(7):533-615466770
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Feb 17;281(7):613-2010029122
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 30;351(27):2870-415625341
Cites: Heart. 2005 May;91 Suppl 2:ii32-4, discussion ii43-815831609
Cites: BMJ. 2006 May 20;332(7551):1166-816709967
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007;(3):CD00491017636778
Cites: BMJ. 2008;337:a165518824488
Cites: J Am Acad Nurse Pract. 2008 Dec;20(12):600-719120591
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2009 Jan-Feb;28(1):75-8519124857
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Jan 20;180(2):175-8219153394
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(1):CD00035619160179
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2009 Mar-Apr;7(2):100-319273863
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2009;9:6819239679
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2009 May;37(3):223-619406855
Cites: Br J Hosp Med (Lond). 2010 Feb;71(2):98-10120220698
PubMed ID
23547654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of functional requirements for electronic health communication: preliminary results from the ELIN project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172213
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2005;13(3):203-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Tom Christensen
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Medisinsk Teknisk Forskningssenter (MTFS), Trondheim, Norway. tom.christensen@utnu.no
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2005;13(3):203-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Family Practice
Humans
Medical Informatics Computing
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Norway
Office Automation
Software Design
Abstract
User participation is important for developing a functional requirements specification for electronic communication. General practitioners and practising specialists, however, often work in small practices without the resources to develop and present their requirements. It was necessary to find a method that could engage practising doctors in order to promote their needs related to electronic communication.
Qualitative research methods were used, starting a process to develop and study documents and collect data from meetings in project groups. Triangulation was used, in that the participants were organised into a panel of experts, a user group, a supplier group and an editorial committee.
The panel of experts created a list of functional requirements for electronic communication in health care, consisting of 197 requirements, in addition to 67 requirements selected from an existing Norwegian standard for electronic patient records (EPRs). Elimination of paper copies sent in parallel with electronic messages, optimal workflow, a common electronic 'envelope' with directory services for units and end-users, and defined requirements for content with the possibility of decision support were the most important requirements.
The results indicate that we have found a method of developing functional requirements which provides valid results both for practising doctors and for suppliers of EPR systems.
PubMed ID
16259860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early experiences with the multidose drug dispensing system--a matter of trust?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137024
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2011 Mar;29(1):45-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Liv Johanne Wekre
Line Melby
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. liv.j.wekre@ntnu.no
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2011 Mar;29(1):45-50
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Documentation
Drug Packaging
Drug Prescriptions
Family Practice
Focus Groups
General practitioners
Home Care Services
Humans
Medical Secretaries
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Norway
Nurses
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Pharmacists
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
Trust
Abstract
To study early experiences with multidose drug dispensing (MDD) among different groups of health personnel.
Qualitative study based on focus-group interviews.
Primary health care, Trondheim, Norway.
The importance of trust in the technology and in collaborating partners is actualized in the early implementation of MDD.
GPs, home-care nurses, pharmacists, and medical secretaries trusted the new MDD technology. The quality of the GPs' medication records improved. However, health personnel, including the GPs themselves, would not always trust the medication records of the GPs. Checking the multidose bags arriving from the pharmacy was considered unnecessary in the written routines dealing with MDD. However, home-care nurses experienced errors and continued to manually check the bags. Nurses in the home-care service felt a loss of knowledge with regard to the patients' medications and in turn experienced reduced ability to give medical information to patients and to observe the effects of the drugs. The home-care services' routines for drug handling were not always trusted by the other groups of health personnel involved.
Health personnel faced some challenges during the implementation of the MDD system, but most of them remained confident in the new system. Building trust has to be a process that runs in parallel with the introduction of new technology and the establishment of new routines for improving the quality in handling of medicines and to facilitate better cooperation and communication.
Notes
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Jun 28;127(13):1766-917599123
Cites: J Nurs Scholarsh. 2007;39(1):82-717393971
Cites: Res Social Adm Pharm. 2007 Sep;3(3):265-8417945158
Cites: Health Care Manage Rev. 2008 Jan-Mar;33(1):2-1218091439
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(2):86-9118570006
Cites: J N Y State Nurses Assoc. 2007 Fall-2008 Winter;38(2):4-918683449
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2009 Sep;78(9):618-2819464231
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2010 Jan-Feb;8(1):40-620065277
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Jun;28(2):82-820429739
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Oct;19(5):e4220688757
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Dec 23;123(24):3598-914691515
Cites: Nursing. 2004 Jan;34(1):36-41; quiz 41-214722431
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2004 Mar-Apr;11(2):104-1214633936
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Apr 22;124(8):114415114408
Cites: Fam Pract. 1993 Jun;10(2):201-68359612
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Jul 5;274(1):35-437791256
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Jul 29;311(7000):299-3027633241
Cites: Methods Inf Med. 2006;45(1):53-6116482371
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2007 Jan;76(1):13-2116455299
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):9-1417354153
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 Sep 20;127(18):2382-517895944
PubMed ID
21323496 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Electronic medical handbooks--are they suitable for implementation of guidelines in health care?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167347
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Sep 21;126(18):2377-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-21-2006
Author
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Norsk senter for elektronisk pasientjournal, Medisinsk-teknisk forskningssenter, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, 7489 Trondheim. anders.grimsmo@ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Sep 21;126(18):2377-9
Date
Sep-21-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
CD-ROM
Decision Support Systems, Clinical
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Information Systems - utilization
Interviews as Topic
Multimedia
Norway
Physicians
Problem-Based Learning
Questionnaires
Students, Medical
Abstract
The Directorate for Health and Social Affairs commissioned a project to evaluate the distribution and use of a Norwegian electronic medical handbook (NEL).
NEL uses multimedia techniques and is distributed on a CD twice a year. A questionnaire about the use of NEL was given to 91 medical students. Health professionals at two hospitals and 12 health centres were interviewed.
The use of the electronic handbook differed more within than between groups of professionals. NEL is applied for three main purposes: decision support, quality assurance and as a source for information pamphlets designed for patients. The professionals believed that NEL has contributed to patients' receiving more information and more uniform treatment. Criticism was made about the price and for the lack of integration with the electronic patient record.
The study has revealed some barriers to implementation and use of electronic information sources. Under certain circumstances an electronic handbook might be suitable way for authorities and others to distribute professional guidelines.
PubMed ID
16998550 View in PubMed
Less detail

Expectations for the next generation of electronic patient records in primary care: a triangulated study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156847
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2008;16(1):21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Tom Christensen
Anders Grimsmo
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Medisinsk Teknisk Forskningssenter (MTFS), N-7489 Trondheim, Norway. tom.christensen@ntnu.no
Source
Inform Prim Care. 2008;16(1):21-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Diffusion of Innovation
Electronic Mail
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - organization & administration
Norway
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Time Factors
Abstract
Although primary care physicians are satisfied users of electronic patient records (EPRs) in Norway today, EPR systems may not have reached their full potential. We studied primary care physicians' needs and experiences in relation to EPRs and analysed potential improvements for today's EPR systems. RESPONDENTS AND METHODS: This is a triangulated study that compares qualitative and quantitative data from focus groups, observations of primary care encounters and a questionnaire survey.
General practioners (GPs) were not satisfied with the level of availability of information within EPR systems. They were especially concerned about follow-up for chronic disease and dealing with patients with multiple conditions. Many expressed a desire for reminders and easier access to clinical guidelines under normal working conditions, as well as the possibility of consultations with specialists from their EPR systems. GPs placed importance on the ability to communicate electronically with patients.
Progress toward a problem-oriented EPR system based on episodes of care that includes decision support is necessary to satisfy the needs expressed by GPs. Further research could solve the problem of integration of functionality for consultation with specialists and integration with patient held records. Results from this study could contribute to further development of the next generation of EPRs in primary care, as well as inspire the application of EPRs in other parts of the health sector.
PubMed ID
18534074 View in PubMed
Less detail

Generic care pathway for elderly patients in need of home care services after discharge from hospital: a cluster randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282916
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Apr 17;17(1):275
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-2017
Author
Tove Røsstad
Øyvind Salvesen
Aslak Steinsbekk
Anders Grimsmo
Olav Sletvold
Helge Garåsen
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Apr 17;17(1):275
Date
Apr-17-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Cluster analysis
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Abstract
Improved discharge arrangements and targeted post-discharge follow-up can reduce the risk of adverse events after hospital discharge for elderly patients. Although more care is to shift from specialist to primary care, there are few studies on post-discharge interventions run by primary care. A generic care pathway, Patient Trajectory for Home-dwelling elders (PaTH) including discharge arrangements and follow-up by primary care, was developed and introduced in Central Norway Region in 2009, applying checklists at defined stages in the patient trajectory. In a previous paper, we found that PaTH had potential of improving follow-up in primary care. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of PaTH-compared to usual care-for elderly in need of home care services after discharge from hospital.
We did an unblinded, cluster randomised controlled trial with 12 home care clusters. Outcomes were measured at the patient level during a 12-month follow-up period for the individual patient and analysed applying linear and logistic mixed models. Primary outcomes were readmissions within 30 days and functional level assessed by Nottingham extended ADL scale. Secondary outcomes were number and length of inpatient hospital care and nursing home care, days at home, consultations with the general practitioners (GPs), mortality and health related quality of life (SF-36).
One-hundred and sixty-three patients were included in the PaTH group (six clusters), and 141 patients received care as usual (six clusters). We found no statistically significant differences between the groups for primary and secondary outcomes except for more consultations with the GPs in PaTH group (p?=?0.04). Adherence to the intervention was insufficient as only 36% of the patients in the intervention group were assessed by at least three of the four main checklists in PaTH, but this improved over time.
Lack of adherence to PaTH rendered the study inconclusive regarding the elderly's functional level, number of readmissions after hospital discharge, and health care utilisation except for more consultations with the GPs. A targeted exploration of prerequisites for implementation is recommended in the pre-trial phase of complex intervention studies.
Clinical Trials.gov NCT01107119 , retrospectively registered 2010.04.18.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Mar;36(2):197-20418519285
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 2005 Apr;20(4):317-2315857487
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Jan 10;316(7125):133-79462322
Cites: Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):206-1222198639
Cites: Lancet. 2015 Apr 25;385(9978):1623-3325662415
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2013 Mar 5;158(5 Pt 2):433-4023460101
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;44(3):1051-6726174515
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2011 Aug;92 (8):1281-721807147
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2010 Sep;28(3):146-5320429738
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 May 02;7:6817475006
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2015 Mar 04;15:8625888898
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Apr 01;13:12123547654
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Sep 18;157(6):417-2822986379
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010 Jan 04;10:120044945
Cites: BMJ. 2008 Sep 29;337:a165518824488
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2007 Sep 19;7:14817880693
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2013 Sep;66(9):1022-823790725
Cites: Age Ageing. 2011 Sep;40(5):557-6221685206
Cites: JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Jul;174(7):1095-10724820131
Cites: Int J Evid Based Healthc. 2009 Jun;7(2):61-7421631848
Cites: BMJ. 2012 Sep 04;345:e566122951546
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Feb 28;297(8):831-4117327525
Cites: BMJ. 2012 Sep 03;345:e520522945950
Cites: J Health Organ Manag. 2007;21(3):297-30617713189
Cites: Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2000 Dec 15;25(24):3130-911124729
PubMed ID
28412943 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.