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18 records – page 1 of 2.

[Large variations in carotid surgery. A questionnaire to surgical units shows different procedures].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141624
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Jun 30-Jul 20;107(26-28):1698-701
Publication Type
Article

Activated protein C-protein C inhibitor complex in peripheral arterial disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97246
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;24(5):588-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
David Blomstrand
Tilo Kölbel
Bengt Lindblad
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
Vascular Centre, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Ann Vasc Surg. 2010 Jul;24(5):588-95
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Thrombin activation measured by the levels of the complex between activated protein C (APC) and the protein C inhibitor (PCI) is elevated in several atherosclerotic disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether levels of the APC-PCI complex are related to the prognosis in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Longitudinal study performed at the Vascular Centre, Malm? University Hospital, Sweden. METHODS: APC-PCI complex levels were analyzed in 268 consecutive patients hospitalized for PAD and in 42 healthy controls (median age, 74 years). Patients (n = 35) with warfarin treatment less than 4 weeks before APC-PCI sampling were excluded from analysis. Data-based medical records of all 233 remaining patients (median age, 72 [64-79] years) were searched for vascular events such as hospitalization because of atherosclerotic disease, operative or endovascular recanalization of peripheral arteries, transtibial or transfemoral amputation because of PAD, acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or death. RESULTS: Median duration of follow-up was 16 months (interquartile range, 12-23 months). APC-PCI complex levels were higher in PAD patients than in controls (0.240 [0.180-0.320] microg/L vs. 0.140 [0.190-0.220] microg/L; p
PubMed ID
20409682 View in PubMed
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Academic vascular unit collaboration with advertising agency yields higher compliance in screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263583
Source
J Med Screen. 2014 Dec;21(4):216-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Moncef Zarrouk
Anders Gottsäter
Martin Malina
Jan Holst
Source
J Med Screen. 2014 Dec;21(4):216-8
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - economics
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Cooperative Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Odds Ratio
Patient compliance
Sweden
Abstract
To improve compliance with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening in low compliance areas, individually tailored invitations were developed in collaboration with a professional advertising agency. Compliance increased in two intervention municipalities from 71.4% in 2010-2012 to 78.1% in 2013 (p?=?0.025), and was then higher [odds ratio 1.7; 95% confidence interval 1.1-2.6; p?=?0.013] than in two control municipalities in which compliance was unchanged (417/552 [75.5%] in 2010-12 and 122/180 [67.8%] in 2013). Compliance with AAA-screening can be increased by collaboration with a professional advertising agency, albeit at a comparably high cost.
PubMed ID
25118161 View in PubMed
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Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis in the population-based Malmö thrombophilia study (MATS). Epidemiology, risk factors, recurrence risk, and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144086
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Jun;125(6):e335-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Nazim Isma
Peter J Svensson
Anders Gottsäter
Bengt Lindblad
Author Affiliation
University of Lund Centre for Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Malmö University Hospital, S - 20502 Malmö, Sweden. nazim.isma@med.lu.se
Source
Thromb Res. 2010 Jun;125(6):e335-8
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Factor V
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Thromboembolism
Thrombophilia
Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is much less common in the upper than in the lower extremity. Furthermore, there is limited information on risk factors for and the prognosis of upper extremity (UE)DVT in the general population.
To estimate incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in UEDVT.
Among a total of 1203 patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) diagnosed during 1998-2006 in the prospective population-based Malmö thrombophilia study, 63 (5%, 33 men [52%, age 54+/-17years], and 30 women [48%, age 55+/-22years]) had UEDVT and were evaluated concerning risk factors, treatment, recurrent VTE, and mortality.
At diagnosis, 19(30%) patients had known malignancy and 6(10%) had VTE heredity. Among female UEDVT patients 4(13%) used hormone therapy, 1(3%) was pregnant, while none was in the postpartum period. Of all 63 UEDVT patients, 12(19%) were heterozygous, and 3(5%) homozygous for the Factor V Leiden (FVL)-mutation. Two (3%) patients were heterozygous for the prothrombin mutation, and 1 patient (1.6%) showed both heterozygous FVL-mutation and lupus anticoagulant antibodies. Phlebography had been used for diagnosis in 48(76%), ultrasonography in 16(25%), and computer tomography (CT) in 9(14%) patients. Twenty-two patients (35%) were treated in hospital, and the remaining 41(65%) as out-patients. Sixty-two (98%) was treated with low molecular weight heparin (LMH), 60(95%) with oral anticoagulants (OAC), 3(5%) with unfractionated heparin, and 3(5%) with thrombolysis. VTE recurrence rate during median 62 (range 31-117) month of follow-up was 8/63(13%). Fifteen (24%) UEDVT patients died during follow-up; 9(47%) of the 19 patients with known malignancy at diagnosis and 6(14%) of the other patients. Yearly incidence of UEDVT was 3.6/100.000 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3 - 4.03).
Malignancies and the FVL mutation were common among patients with UEDVT. Mortality during follow-up vas high.
PubMed ID
20406709 View in PubMed
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Markers of proteolysis, fibrinolysis, and coagulation in relation to size and growth rate of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97505
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2010 May;44(4):262-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Despina Flondell-Sité
Bengt Lindblad
Tilo Kölbel
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
University of Lund, Vascular Centre, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. despina.site@gmail.com
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2010 May;44(4):262-8
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - blood - enzymology - pathology
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Coagulation
Case-Control Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Fibrinolysis
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 - blood
Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 - blood
Middle Aged
Peptide Hydrolases - blood
Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein C - metabolism
Protein C Inhibitor - blood
Sweden
Time Factors
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 - blood
Tissue Plasminogen Activator - blood
Abstract
We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, their inhibitors, markers for fibrinolysis, and thrombin activation are associated with diameter and growth of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Material and Methods: Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMP-1), serpine-1, tPa-serpine-1, and activated protein C- protein C inhibitor (APC-PCI) complex were analyzed in 353 patients with AAA grouped according to AAA size, and 219 gender- and age-matched healthy individuals. Follow-up of AAA growth for up to 7 years was possible in 178 of 353 patients. Results: At baseline, all groups of patients with AAA showed lower levels of MMP-2 and -9, and higher levels of TIMP-1, serpine-1, and t-Pa-serpine-1 than controls. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 correlated inversely and APC-PCI complex correlated directly with AAA diameter. We found no correlations between markers for proteolysis, fibrinolysis, coagulation, and yearly AAA growth. CONCLUSION: Matrix metalloproteinase 2 is lower and APC-PCI higher in patients with larger AAA, but the relevance of the markers for AAA growth is far from clarified.
PubMed ID
20356864 View in PubMed
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Decreasing incidence of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm already before start of screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275547
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016;16:44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sofia Nessvi Otterhag
Anders Gottsäter
Bengt Lindblad
Stefan Acosta
Source
BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2016;16:44
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Aortic Rupture - epidemiology - prevention & control - surgery
Autopsy
Databases, Factual
Female
Humans
Incidence
Information Storage and Retrieval
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Population Growth
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate whether screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has led to a decrease in ruptured AAA (rAAA) incidence.
The Malmö population was evaluated regarding the incidence of rAAA and elective AAA surgery 4 years before and after start of AAA-screening in 2010. Data from 1971 to 1986 (J Vasc Surg 18:74-80, 1993) and 2000-2004 (J Vasc Surg 44:237-43, 2006), enabled analysis of trends over time.
Analysis of time-periods 1971-1986, 2000-2004, 2006-2010 and 2010-2014 showed an incidence of rAAA of 5.6 (4.9-6.3), 10.6 (8.9-12.4), 6.1 (4.6-7.6) and 4.0 (2.9-5.1), respectively. In men aged 60-69 years the incidences were 16.0 (10.7-21.3), 45.6 (27.7-63.4), 19.3 (9.2-35.3) and 8.9 (2.8-20.6), respectively. The incidences of elective AAA surgery in men aged 60-69 years were 22.9 (16.5-29.2), 34.6 (19.1-50.2), 9.7 (1.2-18.5) and 44.2 (27.0-61.6), respectively.
A decrease in incidence of rAAA in men was evident before the implementation of screening. We were yet not able to demonstrate a certain reduction in rAAA incidence after the start of screening.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26888090 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular predictors for long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129228
Source
Vasc Med. 2011 Dec;16(6):422-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Tomas Ohrlander
Magnus Dencker
Nuno V Dias
Anders Gottsäter
Stefan Acosta
Author Affiliation
Eksjö County Hospital, Eksjö, Sweden.
Source
Vasc Med. 2011 Dec;16(6):422-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - mortality
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Comorbidity
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
Endovascular Procedures - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - mortality
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stents
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular predictors for all-cause long-term mortality in patients undergoing standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Consecutive patients treated with EVAR (Zenith(®) stent grafts; Cook) between May 1998 and February 2006 were prospectively enrolled in a computerized database, together with retrospectively collected data on medication, and electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables. Mortality was assessed on 1 December 2010. The median follow-up time was 68 months and the median age was 74 years (range 53-89) for the 304 patients. Mortality at the end of follow-up was 54.3% (165/304). The proportion of deaths caused by vascular diseases was 61% (101/165). In the univariate analysis, low preoperative ejection fraction (EF) (p = 0.004), absence of statin medication (p = 0.007), and medication with diuretics (p = 0.028) or digitalis (p = 0.016) were associated with an increased long-term mortality rate. Myocardial ischemia on electrocardiogram (ECG) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.6 [95% CI 1.1-2.4]) and anemia (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.1]) were found to be independent predictors for long-term mortality after Cox regression analysis. There was a trend that chronic kidney disease, stage = 3 (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.2]), and age 80 years and above (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.4]) were independently associated with long-term mortality. In conclusion, ischemia on ECG and anemia were independently related to an increased long-term mortality rate after EVAR, and these predictive factors seem to be most important for critical assessment in the preoperative medical work-up.
PubMed ID
22128041 View in PubMed
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No association between glucose at age 30 and aortic diameter at age 65 in men: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278461
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2016;50(2):119-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Margaretha Persson
Moncef Zarrouk
Jan Holst
Peter M Nilsson
Anders Gottsäter
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2016;50(2):119-22
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - analysis
Dilatation, Pathologic
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Ultrasonography, Interventional
Abstract
Impaired glucose metabolism and diabetes mellitus has been linked to a decreased risk for abdominal aortic aneurysm development in men. We evaluated potential relationships between blood glucose levels in 1722 men with mean age 34 years and their aortic diameter measured by ultrasound at age 65 years.
Prospective cohort study.
Mean follow-up between baseline glucose investigation and aortic ultrasound was 32.8?±?1.8 years. There was no correlation between baseline blood glucose and later aortic diameter (r?=?0.035, p?=?0.146), whereas a weak correlation between body mass index (BMI) and aortic diameter was observed (r?=?0.097 p?
PubMed ID
26629606 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with Factor V Leiden mutation in heterozygous form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125135
Source
Thromb Res. 2012 Sep;130(3):467-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Signy V Sveinsdottir
Ymir Saemundsson
Nazim Isma
Anders Gottsäter
Peter J Svensson
Author Affiliation
University of Lund, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. signy.sveinsdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Thromb Res. 2012 Sep;130(3):467-71
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Factor V - genetics
Female
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Loss of Heterozygosity - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Sweden
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
To evaluate the risk for recurrence after first venous thromboembolism (VTE) among patients with or without Factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation.
A prospective population based study of 1465 consecutive unselected VTE patients was performed at Skåne University Hospital 1998-2008. The VTE was objectively verified and the patients answered questionnaire and left blood samples for evaluation.
Out of 1465 patients (721[49%] men and 744[51%] women) thrombophilia data were available for 1267, and FVL mutation was found in heterozygous form in 339 (27). The homozygous form and prothrombin mutation (PTM) were much less common. Patients were followed during 4.8 ± 2.3 years (total 6133 patient years) and recurrence after first VTE (evaluated in 1108 patients) occurred in 131 (12%, 95%CI 10-14%), where of 49(37%) had heterozygous FVL mutation and 57(44%) were without thrombophilia. The remaining 25(19%) patients had either PTM, FVL in homozygous form, compound PTM/FVL or unknown thrombophilia status. Having FVL mutation in heterozygous form significantly increased the risk for VTE recurrence (odds ratio 2.4 (95 %CI 1.6-3.6; p
PubMed ID
22512897 View in PubMed
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[Vena cava filters in complicated venous thromboembolism. Ten years' experiences at Malmo University Hospital]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71482
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4462-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-7-2002
Author
Alaa Alhadad
Sara Bromander
Petr Uher
Krasnodar Ivancev
Ingrid Mattiasson
Anders Gottsäter
Author Affiliation
Kliniken för kärlsjukdomar, Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmö.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Nov 7;99(45):4462-8
Date
Nov-7-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - adverse effects - contraindications
English Abstract
Equipment Failure
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University - standards - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pulmonary Embolism - complications - radiography - therapy
Sweden
Thromboembolism - complications - radiography - therapy
Vena Cava Filters - adverse effects
Vena Cava, Inferior - radiography
Venous Thrombosis - complications - radiography - therapy
Abstract
All 74 patients treated with vena cava filter insertion during 1991-2000 at Malmö University Hospital were reviewed. Thirty-nine patients (53%) died during follow-up. Indications for permanent filter insertion (n = 63, age 25-89 years, 35 men) were contraindication for or side effects of anticoagulant treatment, or pulmonary embolism during anticoagulant treatment. Temporary vena cava filters (n = 11, age 19-85 years, three men) were inserted during surgery or thrombolysis. No complications occurred during temporary filter insertion. During 33 (1-120) months of follow-up of patients with permanent vena cava filters 37 patients (59%) died, thrombosis of the inferior vena cava occurred in 14 patients (22%), and recurrent pulmonary embolism in five patients (8%). Vena cava filter insertion should be considered as an alternative treatment in a selected group of patients with contraindications to or insufficient effect of anticoagulant treatment.
PubMed ID
12469523 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.