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164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173671
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Amar A Sethi
Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Pharmacogenet Genomics. 2005 Sep;15(9):633-45
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Arginine - chemistry
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Denmark
Female
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Glutamic Acid - chemistry
Glutamine - chemistry
Glycine - chemistry
Haplotypes
Heart rate
Heterozygote
Humans
Hypertension - genetics
Isoleucine - chemistry
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2 - genetics
Risk
Risk factors
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated with elevated blood pressure.
We genotyped 9185 individuals from the adult Danish general population.
Allele frequencies of 16Arg, 27Glu, and 164Ile were 0.38, 0.44, and 0.01, respectively. Among women never treated with antihypertensive medication those heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had increased diastolic blood pressure (P=0.02). Women heterozygous for Thr164Ile versus non-carriers had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.30-2.86). Finally, women double heterozygous for Thr164Ile and Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg versus non-carriers at all 3 loci had an odds ratio for elevated blood pressure of 2.49 (1.28-4.85) or 3.19 (1.46-6.97). In men, blood pressure was not influenced by this genetic variation.
In women Thr164Ile heterozygosity is associated with increased diastolic blood pressure, and represent a risk factor for elevated blood pressure in women in the general population. This was most pronounced in those women also heterozygous for Gln27Glu or Gly16Arg.
PubMed ID
16041242 View in PubMed
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Genetic variation in liver X receptor alpha and risk of ischemic vascular disease in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131455
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Dec;31(12):2990-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Stefan Stender
Ruth Frikke-Schmidt
Aristomenis Anestis
Dimitris Kardassis
Amar A Sethi
Børge G Nordestgaard
Anne Tybjærg-Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Dec;31(12):2990-6
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Variation - genetics
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - genetics
Orphan Nuclear Receptors - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Although animal studies indicate that liver X receptor alpha (LXRa) might influence risk of atherosclerosis, data in humans remain scarce. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in LXRa associates with risk of ischemic vascular disease and/or plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels in the general population.
We studied 10,281 white persons of Danish ancestry from a general population cohort, including 1,986 in whom ischemic heart disease (IHD) developed, and 989 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 51,429 white persons of Danish ancestry from a general population study, including 3,789 with IHD. We genotyped 10 genetic variants identified by resequencing LXRa. Homozygosity for -840AA/-115AA(=2.7%) predicted hazard ratios of 1.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-1.7) for IHD, 1.6 (1.2-2.2) for myocardial infarction, and 1.7 (1.3-2.4) for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The corresponding odds ratios in the second cohort were 1.1 (0.9-1.4) for IHD and 1.5 (1.1-2.0) for myocardial infarction. In the combined studies, odds ratios were 1.2 (1.0-1.4) for IHD and 1.5 (1.2-1.9) for myocardial infarction. Homozygosity for -840AA/-115AA did not associate with lipid or lipoprotein levels. LXRa -1830T>C (tagging the haplotype -1830C/-840A/-115A, all r(2)=0.97) associated with 91% increased transcriptional activity.
This study suggests that functional genetic variation in LXRa predicts risk of ischemic vascular disease in the general population.
PubMed ID
21903943 View in PubMed
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S1P, dihydro-S1P and C24:1-ceramide levels in the HDL-containing fraction of serum inversely correlate with occurrence of ischemic heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134679
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2011;10:70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kelley M Argraves
Amar A Sethi
Patrick J Gazzolo
Brent A Wilkerson
Alan T Remaley
Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Sharon D Yeatts
Katherine S Nicholas
Jeremy L Barth
W Scott Argraves
Author Affiliation
Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. argravek@musc.edu
Source
Lipids Health Dis. 2011;10:70
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cell Movement - drug effects
Ceramides - blood
Chemical Fractionation
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark - epidemiology
Electric Impedance
Endothelial Cells - drug effects - pathology
Endothelium, Vascular - drug effects - pathology
Female
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lysophospholipids - blood - pharmacology
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology
ROC Curve
Sphingolipids - blood
Sphingosine - analogs & derivatives - blood - pharmacology
Abstract
The lysosphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is carried in the blood in association with lipoproteins, predominantly high density lipoproteins (HDL). Emerging evidence suggests that many of the effects of HDL on cardiovascular function may be attributable to its S1P cargo.
Here we have evaluated how levels of S1P and related sphingolipids in an HDL-containing fraction of human serum correlate with occurrence of ischemic heart disease (IHD). To accomplish this we used liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure S1P levels in the HDL-containing fraction of serum (depleted of LDL and VLDL) from 204 subjects in the Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS). The study group consisted of individuals having high serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) (females:= 73.5 mg/dL; males:= 61.9 mg/dL) and verified IHD; subjects with high HDL-C and no IHD; individuals with low HDL-C (females:= 38.7 mg/dL; males:= 34.1 mg/dL) and IHD, and subjects with low HDL-C and no IHD.
The results show a highly significant inverse relationship between the level of S1P in the HDL-containing fraction of serum and the occurrence of IHD. Furthermore, an inverse relationship with IHD was also observed for two other sphingolipids, dihydro-S1P and C24:1-ceramide, in the HDL-containing fraction of serum. Additionally, we demonstrated that the amount of S1P on HDL correlates with the magnitude of HDL-induced endothelial cell barrier signaling.
These findings indicate that compositional differences of sphingolipids in the HDL-containing fraction of human serum are related to the occurrence of IHD, and may contribute to the putative protective role of HDL in IHD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21554699 View in PubMed
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[Six case-control studies from the Osterbro-study (The Copenhagen City Heart Study). Angiotensinogen mutations and risk of myocardial and cerebral ischemia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53714
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 May 23;99(21):2392-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2002