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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292349
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Ecology and Environmental Biology, Ghent University , 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Nov 07; 51(21):12764-12773
Date
Nov-07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Environmental monitoring
Geologic sediments
Metals
North Sea
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Water Pollutants, Chemical
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
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Additive Models Reveal Sources of Metals and Organic Pollutants in Norwegian Marine Sediments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286492
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2017
Author
Gert Everaert
Anders Ruus
Dag Øystein Hjermann
Katrine Borgå
Norman Green
Stepan Boitsov
Henning Jensen
Amanda Poste
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 26;
Date
Oct-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We characterized spatial patterns of surface sediment concentrations of seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), three chlorinated pesticides, and five metals in Norwegian waters and Skagerrak. In total, we analyzed 5036 concentrations of 22 chemical substances that were measured between 1986 and 2014 at 333 sampling sites by means of generalized additive models (GAMs). We found that GAMs with organic carbon content of the sediment and latitude and longitude as co-variates explained as ca. 75% of the variability of the contaminant sediment concentrations. For metals, a predominantly hotspot-driven spatial pattern was found, i.e., we identified historical pollution hotspots (e.g., Sørfjord in western Norway) for mercury, zinc, cadmium, and lead. Highest concentrations of PAHs and PCBs were found close to densely populated and industrialized regions, i.e., in the North Sea and in the Kattegat and Skagerrak. The spatial pattern of the PCBs suggests the secondary and diffuse atmospheric nature of their sources. Atmospheric inputs are the main sources of pollution for most organic chemicals considered, but north of the Arctic circle, we found that concentrations of PAHs increased from south to north most likely related to a combination of coal-eroding bedrock and the biological pump. The knowledge acquired in the present research is essential for developing effective remediation strategies that are consistent with international conventions on pollution control.
PubMed ID
29034678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Terrestrial inputs govern spatial distribution of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in an Arctic fjord system (Isfjorden, Svalbard).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311330
Source
Environ Pollut. 2021 Mar 17; 281:116963
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-17-2021
Author
Sverre Johansen
Amanda Poste
Ian Allan
Anita Evenset
Pernilla Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Tromsø, Norway; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås, Norway; Norwegian Institute for Water Research, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2021 Mar 17; 281:116963
Date
Mar-17-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Considerable amounts of previously deposited persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are stored in the Arctic cryosphere. Transport of freshwater and terrestrial material to the Arctic Ocean is increasing due to ongoing climate change and the impact this has on POPs in marine receiving systems is unknown This study has investigated how secondary sources of POPs from land influence the occurrence and fate of POPs in an Arctic coastal marine system. Passive sampling of water and sampling of riverine suspended particulate matter (SPM) and marine sediments for analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was carried out in rivers and their receiving fjords in Isfjorden system in Svalbard. Riverine SPM had low contaminant concentrations (
PubMed ID
33823300 View in PubMed
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