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Risk assessment of dietary lead exposure among First Nations people living on-reserve in Ontario, Canada using a total diet study and a probabilistic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294827
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2018 Feb 15; 344:55-63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-15-2018
Author
Amanda K Juric
Malek Batal
Will David
Donald Sharp
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Laurie Chan
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2018 Feb 15; 344:55-63
Date
Feb-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Diet
Drinking Water - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Firearms
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Lead - analysis - toxicity
Meat - analysis
Monte Carlo Method
Ontario
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Indigenous peoples have elevated risk of lead (Pb) exposure as hunted traditional food can be contaminated with lead-containing ammunition. Recent scientific consensus states that there is no threshold level for Pb exposure. The objective of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to Pb among First Nations living on-reserve in the province of Ontario, Canada. A total diet study was constructed based on a 24-h recall and Pb concentrations for traditional foods from the First Nations Food, Nutrition, and Environment Study (FNFNES) and Pb concentrations in market foods from Health Canada. A probabilistic assessment of annual and seasonal traditional food consumption was conducted. Results indicate that traditional foods, particularly moose and deer meat. are the primary source of dietary Pb intake (73%), despite providing only 1.8% of the average caloric intake. The average dietary Pb exposure (0.21µg/kg/d) in the First Nations population in Ontario was 1.7 times higher than the dietary Pb exposure in the general Canadian population. Pb intake was associated with an estimated average increase in systolic blood pressure of 1.2mmHg. These results indicate that consumption of foods hunted with Pb containing ammunition and shot puts the population at elevated risk of Pb toxicity.
PubMed ID
29031094 View in PubMed
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Risk assessment of dietary lead exposure among First Nations people living on-reserve in Ontario, Canada using a total diet study and a probabilistic approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286494
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2017 Oct 05;344:55-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-05-2017
Author
Amanda K Juric
Malek Batal
Will David
Donald Sharp
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Hing Man Chan
Laurie Chan
Source
J Hazard Mater. 2017 Oct 05;344:55-63
Date
Oct-05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Indigenous peoples have elevated risk of lead (Pb) exposure as hunted traditional food can be contaminated with lead-containing ammunition. Recent scientific consensus states that there is no threshold level for Pb exposure. The objective of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to Pb among First Nations living on-reserve in the province of Ontario, Canada. A total diet study was constructed based on a 24-h recall and Pb concentrations for traditional foods from the First Nations Food, Nutrition, and Environment Study (FNFNES) and Pb concentrations in market foods from Health Canada. A probabilistic assessment of annual and seasonal traditional food consumption was conducted. Results indicate that traditional foods, particularly moose and deer meat. are the primary source of dietary Pb intake (73%), despite providing only 1.8% of the average caloric intake. The average dietary Pb exposure (0.21µg/kg/d) in the First Nations population in Ontario was 1.7 times higher than the dietary Pb exposure in the general Canadian population. Pb intake was associated with an estimated average increase in systolic blood pressure of 1.2mmHg. These results indicate that consumption of foods hunted with Pb containing ammunition and shot puts the population at elevated risk of Pb toxicity.
PubMed ID
29031094 View in PubMed
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A total diet study and probabilistic assessment risk assessment of dietary mercury exposure among First Nations living on-reserve in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283920
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Jul 06;158:409-420
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-06-2017
Author
Amanda K Juric
Malek Batal
Will David
Donald Sharp
Harold Schwartz
Amy Ing
Karen Fediuk
Andrew Black
Constantine Tikhonov
Laurie H M Chan
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Jul 06;158:409-420
Date
Jul-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Methyl Mercury (MeHg) exposure is a global environmental health concern. Indigenous peoples around the world are susceptible to MeHg exposure from often higher fish consumption compared to general populations. The objective of this study was to estimate dietary exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) among First Nations living on-reserve in the province of Ontario, Canada. A total diet study was constructed based on a 24-h recall from the First Nations Food, Nutrition, and Environment Study (FNFNES), and measured contaminant concentrations from Health Canada for market foods, and FNFNES for traditional foods. A probabilistic assessment of annual and seasonal traditional food consumptions was conducted for 1429 adult participants. Results were compared to exposures in the general Canadian population and reference values from Health Canada for adults and women of childbearing age (ages 19-50). Results indicated traditional foods to be the primary contributor to the dietary total MeHg intake (72%). The average dietary total MeHg exposure in the First Nations population in Ontario (0.039µg/kg/d) was 1.6 times higher than the general Canadian population; however, the majority (97.8%) of the population was below the reference values. Mercury concentrations in participants' hair samples (n = 744) ranged from 0.03 to 13.54µg/g, with an average of 0.64µg/g (geometric average of 0.27µg/g). Less than 1% of the population had a hair mercury value above the 6µg/g level, and 1.3% of women of child bearing age had values greater than 2µg/g. Fish species contributing to the MeHg intake included pickerel-walleye, pike, perch and trout. Only 7.9% of the population met the recommended fish consumption rate of two, 3.5oz servings per week from the American Heart Association. Therefore, consumption of lower trophic level fish can be promoted to provide the maximum nutritional benefit with minimal risk of MeHg exposure.
PubMed ID
28689032 View in PubMed
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