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2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174812
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005
Author
Don Yee
Alysa Fairchild
Mira Keyes
Jim Butler
George Dundas
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 Jun 1;62(2):526-34
Date
Jun-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Program Evaluation
Radiation Oncology - education
Abstract
Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences.
Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey.
Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns.
Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.
PubMed ID
15890597 View in PubMed
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Improving access to specialist multidisciplinary palliative care consultation for rural cancer patients by videoconferencing: report of a pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118870
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2013 Apr;21(4):1201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Sharon M Watanabe
Alysa Fairchild
Edith Pituskin
Patricia Borgersen
John Hanson
Konrad Fassbender
Author Affiliation
Department of Symptom Control and Palliative Care, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2013 Apr;21(4):1201-7
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Caregivers - psychology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy
Palliative Care
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Remote Consultation - methods
Rural Health Services
Telemedicine
Videoconferencing
Young Adult
Abstract
Palliative care (PC) and palliative radiotherapy (RT) consultation are integral to the care of patients with advanced cancer. These services are not universally available in rural areas, and travel to urban centers to access them can be burdensome for patients and families. The objectives of our study were to assess the feasibility of using videoconferencing to provide specialist multidisciplinary PC and palliative RT consultation to cancer patients in rural areas and to explore symptom, cost, and satisfaction outcomes.
The Virtual Pain and Symptom Control and Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic was piloted from January 2008 to March 2011. Cancer patients in rural northern Alberta attended local telehealth facilities, accompanied by nurses trained in symptom assessment. The multidisciplinary team at the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton was linked by videoconference. Team recommendations were sent to the patients' family physicians. Data were collected on referral, clinical, and consultation characteristics and symptom, cost, and satisfaction outcomes.
Forty-four initial consultation and 28 follow-up visits took place. Mean Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale scores for anxiety and appetite were statistically significantly improved at the first follow-up visit (p?
PubMed ID
23161339 View in PubMed
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In pursuit of an artful death: discussion of resuscitation status on an inpatient radiation oncology service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175139
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2005 Oct;13(10):842-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Alysa Fairchild
Karie-Lynn Kelly
Alex Balogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T6G 1Z2. alysafai@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2005 Oct;13(10):842-9
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Death
Female
Humans
Informed consent
Inpatients
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Radiation Oncology
Resuscitation Orders
Retrospective Studies
Terminally ill
Abstract
Consensus has emerged among health practitioners, legal experts, clinical ethicists and the public that end-of-life decisions should be the shared responsibility of physicians and patients. In discussion of withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in cancer patients, however, opinion remains divided. We performed a quality assurance investigation on the use of the 'do-not-resuscitate' (DNR) order on an inpatient radiation oncology service to determine how often DNR orders are accompanied by a description of informed consent.
Records of patients admitted 1 July to 31 December 2002 were identified and reviewed to determine the presence or absence of a DNR order. Circumstances surrounding the order, including evidence of informed consent, were determined.
The study population comprised 96 patients admitted 109 times. The median age was 64 years, and in 56.0% of admissions, the patient was female. In 26.8%, the patient had lung cancer. The intent of admission was curative in 53.2%, and palliative in 44.0%. DNR was recorded for 30.2% of patients, and there was evidence of informed consent in 41.4%. In 89.7% admission was with palliative intent. Nine patients (9.4%) experienced cardiac arrest; all were DNR at the time of their event.
While almost one-third of the patients on this inpatient radiation oncology service had documented DNR status, informed consent appeared to have been obtained in fewer than half. Patient involvement in resuscitative decisions should be an ethical obligation. Performed well, this may also allow for exploration of patients' needs at the end of life, to allow the pursuit of what Nuland terms an 'artful death'.
PubMed ID
15846524 View in PubMed
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A multicenter assessment of the adequacy of cancer pain treatment using the pain management index.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144076
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):589-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Gunita Mitera
Alysa Fairchild
Carlo DeAngelis
Urban Emmenegger
Laura Zurawel-Balaura
Liying Zhang
Andrea Bezjak
Wilfred Levin
Michael Mclean
Nadil Zeiadin
Jocelyn Pang
Janet Nguyen
Emily Sinclair
Edward Chow
Rebecca Wong
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Therapy, Odette Cancer Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Gunita.Mitera@sunnybrook.ca
Source
J Palliat Med. 2010 May;13(5):589-93
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Female
Humans
Licensure, Medical
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - complications
Pain - diagnosis - etiology
Pain Management
Pain Measurement
Palliative Care
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life - psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Determine adequacy of management of pain secondary to bone metastases by physicians referring to specialized outpatient palliative radiotherapy (RT) clinics in Canada; compare geographic differences in adequacy of pain management and pain severity between these cohorts; compare results with published international literature.
Prospectively collected data from three participating centers were used to calculate the Pain Management Index (PMI) by subtracting the patient-rated pain score at time of initial clinic visit from the analgesic score. Scores were 0, 1, 2, and 3 when patients reported no pain (0), mild (1-4), moderate (5-6), or severe pain (7-10), respectively, on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System or Brief Pain Inventory. Analgesic scores of 0, 1, 2, and 3 were assigned for no pain medication, nonopioids, weak opioids, and strong opioids respectively. A negative PMI suggests inadequate pain management.
Overall incidence of negative PMI and moderate to severe pain was 25.1% and 70.9% respectively for 2011 patients. Comparing the three participating centers, the incidence of negative PMI was 31.0%, 20.0%, and 16.8% (p
PubMed ID
20408764 View in PubMed
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Multidisciplinary team contributions within a dedicated outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic: a prospective descriptive study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145866
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Oct 1;78(2):527-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2010
Author
Edith Pituskin
Alysa Fairchild
Jennifer Dutka
Lori Gagnon
Amy Driga
Patty Tachynski
Jo-Ann Borschneck
Sunita Ghosh
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada. pituskin@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Oct 1;78(2):527-32
Date
Oct-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Ambulatory Care Facilities - utilization
Anxiety - therapy
Bone Neoplasms - psychology - radiotherapy - secondary
Chi-Square Distribution
Depression - therapy
Dietary Services - utilization
Fatigue - therapy
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Occupational Therapy - utilization
Pain - etiology - psychology - radiotherapy
Palliative Care - methods - utilization
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - utilization
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - utilization
Prospective Studies
Social Work - statistics & numerical data
Spirituality
Abstract
Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic.
Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes.
A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks.
Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.
PubMed ID
20100640 View in PubMed
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Patterns of referral and knowledge of palliative radiotherapy in Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125932
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Feb;58(2):e113-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Alysa Fairchild
Sunita Ghosh
Jane Baker
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton, Alta., Canada. alysa@ualberta.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2012 Feb;58(2):e113-22
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Canada
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Nurse's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To assess practitioners' referral patterns and knowledge of palliative radiotherapy (PRT).
A 23-item questionnaire.
Northern Alberta and parts of British Columbia, Saskatchewan, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut.
A total of 1360 health practitioners, including primary care physicians and nurse clinicians in rural, remote, or far northern regions; FP-oncologists working in community cancer centres; palliative care (PC)specialists; and medical oncologists.
Survey respondents rated how much certain factors influenced their decisions to refer patients for PRT and estimated their knowledge of PRT. Descriptive and summary statistics were compiled.
The overall eligible response rate was 31.8% (412 of 1294); 85.4% of respondents were FPs, 65.3% were men, and 44.9% practised in rural settings. A total of 81.8% of respondents sometimes or often provided PC and 71.0% had referred patients for PRT. Main factors taken into account when referring patients were functional status (93.1%; 349 of 375), histology (75.4%; 285 of 378), and concern about side effects (75.3%; 281 of 373).Half of respondents considered wait times for PRT delivery important. Self-rated knowledge of PRT was poor for 74.0% of respondents, fair for 24.5%, and good for 1.5%. Actual knowledge scores were poor for 46.6% of respondents, fair for 36.7%, and good for 16.7%. Respondents who referred patients for PRT had been in practice longer, saw more cancer patients per month, provided PC more frequently, had higher self-rated PRT knowledge,and had better actual PRT knowledge.
Disease- and patient-related factors outweighed concerns about wait times. Although referring practitioners are better informed than they believe themselves to be, further improvements in their knowledge could increase referrals of appropriate patients for PRT.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22439173 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.