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Amount and type of alcohol consumption and missing teeth among community-dwelling older adults: findings from the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127155
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karen Heegaard
Kirsten Avlund
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Allan Bardow
Morten Grønbaek
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. karen.heegaard@mail.tele.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2011;71(4):318-26
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - classification - statistics & numerical data
Beer - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Population Surveillance
Sedentary lifestyle
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Social Class
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Wine - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study if an association between total weekly intake of alcohol, type-specific weekly alcohol intake, alcoholic beverage preference, and the number of teeth among older people exists.
A cross-sectional study including a total of 783 community-dwelling men and women aged 65-95 years who were interviewed about alcohol drinking habits and underwent a clinical oral and dental examination. Multiple regression analyses were applied for studying the association between total weekly alcohol consumption, beverage-specific alcohol consumption, beverage preference (defined as the highest intake of one beverage type compared with two other types), and the number of remaining teeth (= 20 versus >20 remaining teeth).
The odds ratio (OR) of having a low number of teeth decreased with the total intake of alcohol in women, with ORs for a low number of teeth of 0.40 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.76] in women drinking 1-14 drinks per week and 0.34 (95 percent CI 0.16-0.74) in women with an intake of more than 14 drinks per week compared with abstainers. Similar relations could also be obtained for type-specific alcohol intake of wine and for wine and spirits preference among women. Men who preferred beer showed a decreased risk for a low number of teeth compared with men with other alcohol preferences.
In this study, alcohol consumption, wine drinking, and wine and spirits preference among women were associated with a higher number of teeth compared with abstainers. Among men, those who preferred beer also had a higher number of teeth.
PubMed ID
22320290 View in PubMed
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The Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort: design, population and dental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138774
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Karen M Heegaard
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Allan Bardow
Ulla A Hvidtfeldt
Morten Grønbaek
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Gerontological Oral Health Research Centre, School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Gerodontology. 2011 Sep;28(3):165-76
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cuspid - pathology
Denmark
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Incisor - pathology
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital status
Motor Activity
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Oral Health
Polypharmacy
Refusal to Participate - statistics & numerical data
Root Caries - epidemiology
Saliva - secretion
Secretory Rate - physiology
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to study the way old age influence oral health, the Copenhagen Oral Health Senior Cohort (COHS) has been established.
To describe the design, measurement procedures, and baseline values for COHS including spatial distribution of restorations and dental caries as well as reasons for non-participation.
Seven hundred and eighty-three individuals aged 65 years or older, from a total of 1918 invited elderly people, underwent an interview regarding oral health-related behaviour and a clinical oral examination including measurement of unstimulated whole saliva flow rate.
Twelve percent of the COHS was edentulous. The number of dental restorations was higher for women compared to men; however, men had more caries than women. Coronal caries was most frequent on mesial and distal surfaces and on the maxillary incisors and canines; root caries was most frequent on labial surfaces and evenly distributed within the dentition. Only 41% of all invited elderly people accepted the invitation, with old age and poor health being the primary reasons for non-participation.
The baseline values for COHS show that a substantial proportion of the participants had retained a natural dentition and that dental caries was prevalent with the anterior maxillary teeth being most affected.
PubMed ID
21138466 View in PubMed
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Does drinking water influence hospital-admitted sialolithiasis on an epidemiological level in Denmark?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269396
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(4):e007385
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Stine Schrøder
Preben Homøe
Niels Wagner
Anne-Lise Vataire
Hans Erik Lundager Madsen
Allan Bardow
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(4):e007385
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anions - analysis
Calcium - analysis
Cations - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Drinking Water - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Humans
Incidence
Magnesium - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Salivary Gland Calculi - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Sialolithiasis, or salivary stones, is not a rare disease of the major salivary glands. However, the aetiology and incidence remain largely unknown. Since sialoliths are comprised mainly of calcium phosphate salts, we hypothesise that drinking water calcium levels and other elements in drinking water could play a role in sialolithiasis. Owing to substantial intermunicipality differences in drinking water composition, Denmark constitutes a unique environment for testing such relations.
An epidemiological study based on patient data extracted from the National Patient Registry and drinking water data from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland retrieved as weighted data on all major drinking water constituents for each of the 3364 waterworks in Denmark. All patient cases with International Statistical Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes for sialolithiasis registered between the years 2000 and 2010 were included in the study (n=3014) and related to the drinking water composition on a municipality level (n=98).
Multiple regression analysis using iterative search and testing among all demographic and drinking water variables with sialolithiasis incidence as the outcome in search of possible relations among the variables tested.
The nationwide incidence of hospital-admitted sialolithiasis was 5.5 cases per 100,000 citizens per year in Denmark. Strong relations were found between the incidence of sialolithiasis and the drinking water concentration of calcium, magnesium and hydrogen carbonate, however, in separate models (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
25941183 View in PubMed
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Findings from the oral health study of the Danish Health Examination Survey 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114308
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Johanne Kongstad
Kim Ekstrand
Vibeke Qvist
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Birthe Cortsen
Morten Grønbaek
Poul Holm-Pedersen
Palle Holmstrup
Allan Bardow
Svante Twetman
Nils-Erik Fiehn
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen , Copenhagen N , Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2013 Nov;71(6):1560-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of the oral part of the Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES 2007-2008) were (1) to establish an oral health database for adult Danes and (2) to explore the influence of general diseases and lifestyle on oral health. This paper presents the study population, examination methods, questionnaire and baseline results.
The study population comprised 4402 subjects, aged 18-96, consecutively enrolled from 18 065 DANHES participants from 13 municipalities in Denmark. The oral part consisted of a validated questionnaire and a clinical examination, carried out in mobile units by three trained and calibrated dental hygienists. The data were processed with descriptive statistics and mono- and bivariate analyses.
The mean age was 54.1 years and 60% were women. The mean number of natural teeth was 26.6; the mean DMFT/DMFS values were 18.9 and 61.0, and varied with age (DMFT 8.7-24.3). A higher proportion of females suffered from dental erosion in the younger age groups. Forty per cent of all subjects had a mean clinical attachment loss = 3 mm, varying from 4% among those aged 18-34 to 80% in those over 75. A sub-optimal saliva secretion rate was more common among females than males (17.7% vs 10.4%) and this was reflected by the reported frequency of dry mouth.
This extensive cross-sectional study provides a platform for obtaining future knowledge of the impact of health- and lifestyle-related factors on oral diseases. The validated questionnaire and the clinical characteristics enable robust analyses, although the conclusions may be hampered by limited external validity.
PubMed ID
23627881 View in PubMed
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Incidence of sialolithiasis in Denmark: a nationwide population-based register study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282581
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Apr;274(4):1975-1981
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Stine Attrup Schrøder
Mikael Andersson
Jan Wohlfahrt
Niels Wagner
Allan Bardow
Preben Homøe
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2017 Apr;274(4):1975-1981
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Salivary Gland Calculi - epidemiology
Abstract
Sialolithiasis is a frequent disorder affecting the salivary glands. The incidence rate (IR) has been reported to be 2.9-5.5 per 100,000 person-years, but all previous studies have been based on selected hospital data. In this study, we conducted a population-based study evaluating the IR of sialolithiasis and the IR variation according to age, gender and geography in Denmark. We included data from hospitals as well as from private ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinics. The study was based on registry data on all sialolithiasis cases in Denmark between 2003 and 2009 extracted from the Danish National Patient Registry (hospital cohort) and the Danish Regions Centre for Healthcare Statistics (private ENT clinic cohort). To validate the diagnosis, the proportion of visually confirmed cases was estimated based on patient records from subsamples of the two cohorts. The IR was 7.27 and 14.10 per 100,000 person-years based on visually confirmed cases only and on all cases, respectively. The highest IR was observed among 60- to 70-year-olds, in the North Denmark region and among females. In the validation subsamples, 35% of assumed sialoliths were visually confirmed in the private ENT clinic cohort and 59% in the hospital cohort. In this first population-based study of IR on sialolithiasis, we found a substantially higher IR. With respect to both visually confirmed cases and all cases, this is higher than previously reported from studies based on selected hospital data.
PubMed ID
28005152 View in PubMed
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Root caries, root surface restorations and lifestyle factors in adult Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269461
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2015 Aug;73(6):467-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Allan Bardow
Kim Ekstrand
Nils-Erik Fiehn
Berit L Heitmann
Vibeke Qvist
Svante Twetman
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2015 Aug;73(6):467-73
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Risk factors
Root Caries - epidemiology
Social Class
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate selected lifestyle factors in relation to active caries and restored root surface lesions in adults.
Based on clinical examinations and questionnaires, data on root caries, socioeconomic status, body mass index, dietary habits, alcohol consumption, tobacco use and oral hygiene routines were collected from 4369 adults aged 21-89 who took part in a survey covering 13 municipalities across Denmark. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to analyse the relationship between the independent lifestyle variables and active caries and restored root surface lesions, respectively.
The prevalence of active root caries was 4%, while 26% displayed restored root surfaces. The sugar intake was not related to root caries. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that, in subjects aged 45 or over, smoking and wearing dentures were significantly associated with presence of active root caries (p
PubMed ID
25467782 View in PubMed
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Saliva composition in three selected groups with normal stimulated salivary flow rates, but yet major differences in caries experience and dental erosion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261439
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Aug;72(6):466-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Allan Bardow
Joan Lykkeaa
Vibeke Qvist
Kim Ekstrand
Svante Twetman
Niels-Erik Fiehn
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2014 Aug;72(6):466-73
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Saliva - chemistry
Tooth Erosion - physiopathology
Abstract
It was hypothesized that, by comparing matched subjects with major differences in these dental diseases, but yet normal saliva flow rates, it would be possible to obtain data on the effect of saliva composition on dental disease isolated from the effect of the flow rate. Thus, the aim of the study was to compare the major physicochemical characteristics of stimulated whole saliva in three groups of 85 subjects, each with normal saliva flow rates and at least 24 remaining teeth.
A group with very little dental disease (healthy), a group with dental erosion (erosion) and a group with very high caries experience (caries) were chosen. Furthermore, the aim was to determine whether differences among groups could also be found on an individual level.
Although it was not possible to retrieve three groups whose members were completely identical, the present study points in the direction that, on a group level, subjects with very little dental disease seemed to have a more favorable physicochemical saliva composition with respect to higher calcium, phosphate, bicarbonate, pH, degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite and a lower critical pH (p
PubMed ID
24308632 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.