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Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and Pneumocystis colonization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180318
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Aug 15;170(4):408-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2004
Author
Alison Morris
Frank C Sciurba
Irina P Lebedeva
Andrew Githaiga
W Mark Elliott
James C Hogg
Laurence Huang
Karen A Norris
Author Affiliation
M.S., Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, 2011 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. alison.morris@usc.edu
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2004 Aug 15;170(4):408-13
Date
Aug-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumocystis - isolation & purification
Pneumocystis Infections - epidemiology
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - classification - epidemiology - microbiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology - pathology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Factors modulating the variable progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are largely unknown, but infectious agents may play a role. Because Pneumocystis has previously been shown to induce a CD8(+) lymphocyte- and neutrophil-predominant response similar to that in COPD, we explored the association of the organism with accelerated disease progression. We examined Pneumocystis colonization rates in lung tissue obtained during lung resection or transplantation in smokers with a range of airway obstruction severity and in a control group with lung diseases other than COPD. Using nested polymerase chain reaction, Pneumocystis colonization was detected in 36.7% of patients with very severe COPD (Global Health Initiative on Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stage IV) compared with 5.3% of smokers with normal lung function or less severe COPD (Stages 0, I, II, and III) (p = 0.004) and with 9.1% of control subjects (p = 0.007). Colonized subjects exhibited more severe airway obstruction (median FEV(1) = 21% predicted versus 62% in noncolonized subjects, p = 0.006). GOLD IV was the strongest predictor of Pneumocystis colonization (odds ratio = 7.3, 95% confidence interval = 2.4-22.4, p
PubMed ID
15117741 View in PubMed
Less detail

A prospective cohort analysis of gut microbial co-metabolism in Alaska Native and rural African people at high and low risk of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307637
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2020 02 01; 111(2):406-419
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-01-2020