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Adenovirus-36 is associated with obesity in children and adults in Sweden as determined by rapid ELISA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122107
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e41652
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Malin Almgren
Richard Atkinson
Jia He
Agneta Hilding
Emilia Hagman
Alicja Wolk
Anders Thorell
Claude Marcus
Erik Näslund
Claes-Göran Östenson
Martin Schalling
Catharina Lavebratt
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(7):e41652
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - immunology - isolation & purification - physiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Viral - blood - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - blood - virology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Experimental and natural human adenovirus-36 (Adv36) infection of multiple animal species results in obesity through increasing adipogenesis and lipid accumulation in adipocytes. Presence of Adv36 antibodies detected by serum neutralization assay has previously been associated with obesity in children and adults living in the USA, South Korea and Italy, whereas no association with adult obesity was detected in Belgium/The Netherlands nor among USA military personnel. Adv36 infection has also been shown to reduce blood lipid levels, increase glucose uptake by adipose tissue and skeletal muscle biopsies, and to associate with improved glycemic control in non-diabetic individuals.
Using a novel ELISA, 1946 clinically well-characterized individuals including 424 children and 1522 non-diabetic adults, and 89 anonymous blood donors, residing in central Sweden representing the population in Stockholm area, were studied for the presence of antibodies against Adv36 in serum. The prevalence of Adv36 positivity in lean individuals increased from ~7% in 1992-1998 to 15-20% in 2002-2009, which paralleled the increase in obesity prevalence. We found that Adv36-positive serology was associated with pediatric obesity and with severe obesity in females compared to lean and overweight/mildly obese individuals, with a 1.5 to 2-fold Adv36 positivity increase in cases. Moreover, Adv36 positivity was less common among females and males on antilipid pharmacological treatment or with high blood triglyceride level. Insulin sensitivity, measured as lower HOMA-IR, showed a higher point estimate in Adv36-positive obese females and males, although it was not statistically significant (p?=?0.08).
Using a novel ELISA we show that Adv36 infection is associated with pediatric obesity, severe obesity in adult females and lower risk of high blood lipid levels in non-diabetic Swedish individuals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22848557 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk of heart failure in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278386
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2016 Mar;18(3):253-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Thanasis G Tektonidis
Agneta Åkesson
Bruna Gigante
Alicja Wolk
Susanna C Larsson
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2016 Mar;18(3):253-9
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Diet, Mediterranean
Heart Failure - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Registries
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
We examined the hypothesis that high adherence to a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of developing heart failure (HF) as well as the risk of death from HF.
The study population comprised 37 308 men from the Cohort of Swedish Men who were free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. The modified Mediterranean diet (mMED) score was created from a self-administered food frequency questionnaire, based on consumption of presumed beneficial/detrimental foods, on a 0-8 scale. Incident HF events were ascertained by linkage to the Swedish National Patient and the Cause of Death Registers. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression models. We identified 146 deaths from HF and 1269 incident HF events over a median follow-up of 10.9 years (1998-2008). The mMED score was inversely associated with risk of HF (multivariable RR for the highest vs. lowest quartile 0.69, 95% CI 0.57, 0.83); the corresponding RR of HF mortality was 0.55 (95% CI 0.31, 0.98). The multivariable RR for every two-point increment in the mMED score was 0.85 (95% CI 0.78, 0.91) for incidence of HF and 0.78 (95% CI 0.62, 0.98) for mortality from HF, respectively.
High adherence to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a lower risk of HF and mortality from HF in men. Further studies are needed to replicate these findings in other populations.
PubMed ID
26781788 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274979
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 1;138(11):2657-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2016
Author
Holly R Harris
Leif Bergkvist
Alicja Wolk
Source
Int J Cancer. 2016 Jun 1;138(11):2657-64
Date
Jun-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Diet
Estrogen Receptor alpha - genetics
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
United States
Abstract
The World Cancer Research Fund/American Association for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) has published eight nutrition-related recommendations for the prevention of cancer. However, few prospective studies have examined these recommendations by breast cancer hormone receptor subtype and only one case-control study has included the dietary supplements recommendation in their evaluation. We investigated whether adherence to the WCRF/AICR cancer prevention recommendations was associated with breast cancer incidence, overall and by hormone receptor subtype, in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Among 31,514 primarily postmenopausal women diet and lifestyle factors were assessed with a self-administered food frequency questionnaire. A score was constructed based on adherence to the recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, energy density, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks and dietary supplements (score range 0-7). Cox proportional hazard models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). During 15 years of follow-up 1,388 cases of breast cancer were identified. Women who met six to seven recommendations had a 51% decreased risk of breast cancer compared to women meeting only zero to two recommendations (95% CI = 0.35-0.70). The association between each additional recommendation met and breast cancer risk was strongest for the ER-positive/PR-positive subtype (HR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.94), while for the ER-negative/PR-negative subtype the individual recommendations regarding plant and animal foods were most strongly associated with reduced risk. Our findings support that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations reduces breast cancer risk in a population of primarily postmenopausal women. Promoting these recommendations to the public could help reduce breast cancer incidence.
PubMed ID
26804371 View in PubMed
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Age and temporal trends of total physical activity among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49553
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):240-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Nicola Orsini
Rino Bellocco
Matteo Bottai
Marcello Pagano
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. nicola.orsini@imm.ki.se
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Feb;38(2):240-5
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: Few epidemiological studies have been conducted among middle-aged women on long-term total and specific physical activity (PA) trends. We studied in a cross-sectional setting the relationship of self-reported total daily PA with age and calendar time. METHODS: In a population-based cohort of 38,988 women aged 49-83 yr in central Sweden, information was collected on physical activity, such as work or occupation, household work, walking or bicycling, exercise, watching TV or reading, and other lifestyle factors through a self-administered questionnaire. Total and specific daily PA levels at ages 15, 30, and 50 yr were recalled retrospectively and measured as metabolic equivalents (MET.h.d(-1)). RESULTS: Total PA level linearly decreased with calendar time in all three age groups (slope for 5-yr change in calendar time among those 15 yr of age = -0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.86 to -0.78; among those 30 yr of age=-0.42; 95% CI, -0.45 to -0.38; and among those 50 yr of age = -0.62; 95% CI, -0.66 to -0.58). High-intensity activities such as walking or bicycling decreased by 0.21 MET.h.d(-1) (95% CI, -0.22 to -0.20) every 5-calendar-year change among adolescents between the 1930s and 1960s. Total activity level decreased in all age groups by an average of approximately 3MET.h(-1).d(-1), corresponding to approximately 45 min of brisk walking. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intervention efforts aimed at engaging in healthful amounts of physical activity are needed throughout the life cycle.
PubMed ID
16531890 View in PubMed
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Age and temporal trends of total physical activity in Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49755
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Apr;35(4):617-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
Anna Norman
Rino Bellocco
Florin Vaida
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Apr;35(4):617-22
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Occupations
Physical Fitness
Public Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sports
Sweden
Abstract
INTRODUCTION/PURPOSE: Despite a large public health interest in physical activity and its role in obesity and other chronic diseases, only few reports to date have addressed total levels and trends of physical activity. We have studied in a cross-sectional setting with a retrospective recall of physical activity an association of levels of total physical activity and different types of activities with age and with calendar-time. METHODS: In a population-based study of 33,466 men aged 45-79 yr in central Sweden, information on physical activity and other lifestyle factors was collected through a self-administered questionnaire. Level of total activity at ages 15, 30, and 50 yr was assessed quantitatively, based on six questions on different activities: work/occupation, housework, walking/bicycling, exercise, inactive leisure time, and sleeping. The physical activity levels were measured as metabolic equivalents, MET-hours per days. RESULTS: Total daily physical activity decreased at age 30 yr (-1.6%, 95% CI: -1.7, -1.4) and at age 50 yr (-3.9%, 95% CI: -4.0, -3.7) compared with age 15 yr. Total physical activity decreased over a period of 60 yr in all three separate age groups (-9.1% among 15-yr-olds, 95% CI: -9.8, -8.5; -2.3% among 30-yr-olds 95% CI: -3.0, -1.6; and -2.9% among 50-yr-olds, 95% CI: -3.4, -2.5). CONCLUSION: These negative trends in physical activity observed by age and with time might explain the trends in increasing prevalence of obesity.
PubMed ID
12673145 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and incident heart failure among middle-aged and elderly men: cohort of Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265136
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2015 May;8(3):422-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Kirsten S Dorans
Elizabeth Mostofsky
Emily B Levitan
Niclas Håkansson
Alicja Wolk
Murray A Mittleman
Source
Circ Heart Fail. 2015 May;8(3):422-7
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Cause of Death
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Incidence
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Monte Carlo Method
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Compared with no alcohol consumption, heavy alcohol intake is associated with a higher rate of heart failure (HF) whereas light-to-moderate intake may be associated with a lower rate. However, several prior studies did not exclude former drinkers, who may have changed alcohol consumption in response to diagnosis. This study aimed to investigate the association between alcohol intake and incident HF.
We conducted a prospective cohort study of 33 760 men aged 45 to 79 years with no HF, diabetes mellitus, or myocardial infarction at baseline participating in the Cohort of Swedish Men Study. We excluded former drinkers. At baseline, participants completed a food frequency questionnaire and reported other characteristics. HF was defined as hospitalization for or death from HF, ascertained by Swedish inpatient and cause-of-death records from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2011. We constructed Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable-adjusted incidence rate ratios. During follow-up, 2916 men were hospitalized for (n=2139) or died (n=777) of incident HF. There was a U-shaped relationship between total alcohol intake and incident HF (P=0.0004). There was a nadir at light-to-moderate alcohol intake: consuming 7 to
Notes
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PubMed ID
25872788 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and postmenopausal breast cancer risk defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9088
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1601-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-2005
Author
Reiko Suzuki
Weimin Ye
Tove Rylander-Rudqvist
Shigehira Saji
Graham A Colditz
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1601-8
Date
Nov-2-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - chemistry - epidemiology - etiology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Humans
Mammography
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Postmenopause
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Estrogen - analysis
Receptors, Progesterone - analysis
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcohol intake has been reported to be positively associated with an increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer; however, the association with the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) status of the breast tumors remains unclear. METHODS: Self-reported data on alcohol consumption were collected in 1987 and 1997 from 51,847 postmenopausal women in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Through June 30, 2004, 1188 invasive breast cancer case patients with known ER and PR status were identified during an average 8.3-year follow-up. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) of breast cancer, adjusting for age; family history of breast cancer; body mass index; height; parity; age at menarche, first birth, and menopause; education level; use of postmenopausal hormones; and diet. Heterogeneity among groups was evaluated using the Wald test. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk for the development of ER-positive (+) tumors, irrespective of PR status (highest intake [> or = 10 g of alcohol per day] versus nondrinkers, multivariable RR = 1.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.80; Ptrend
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1563-416264173
PubMed ID
16264180 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and mortality: a dose-response analysis in terms of time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256502
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):291-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Andrea Bellavia
Matteo Bottai
Alicja Wolk
Nicola Orsini
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Unit of Biostatistics, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: andrea.bellavia@ki.se.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):291-6
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Low-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with decreased mortality. However, many aspects of this association are still debated. Our aim was to complement available information by conducting a dose-response analysis of the association between alcohol consumption and survival time.
In a Swedish population-based cohort of 67,706 middle-aged and elderly men and women, frequency and amount of drinking were assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire. During 15 years of follow-up, 13,323 participants died. Differences in survival (10th percentile differences, PDs) according to levels of alcohol consumption were estimated using Laplace regression.
We found evidence of nonlinearity between alcohol consumption and survival. Among women, we observed a rapid increase in survival up to 6 g/d of alcohol consumption (0.5 drinks/d) where survival was 17 months longer (PD = 17 months, 95% confidence interval, 10 to 24). After this peak, higher alcohol consumption was progressively associated with shorter survival. Among men, survival improved up to 15 g/d (1.5 drinks/d) where we observed a PD of 15 months (95% confidence interval, 8 to 22).
Low alcohol consumption was associated with improved survival up to 1.5 years for women with an average consumption of 0.5 drinks per day and to 1.3 years for men with an average consumption of 1.5 drinks per day.
PubMed ID
24486142 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation: a prospective study and dose-response meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256460
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):281-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2014
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Nikola Drca
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: susanna.larsson@ki.se.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):281-9
Date
Jul-22-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although high alcohol consumption has been associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), the role of light to moderate drinking remains unclear.
The study sought to investigate the association between alcohol consumption and AF risk in a prospective study of Swedish men and women and to conduct a meta-analysis of prospective studies to summarize available evidence.
We followed 79,019 men and women who, at baseline, were free from AF and had completed a questionnaire about alcohol consumption and other risk factors for chronic diseases. Incident AF cases were ascertained by linkage to the Swedish Inpatient Register. For the meta-analysis, studies were identified by searching PubMed through January 10, 2014, and by reviewing references of pertinent publications. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) were combined using a random effects model.
Over 859,420 person-years of follow-up (1998 to 2009), 7,245 incident AF cases were identified in our own cohort study. The association between alcohol consumption and AF did not differ by sex (p for interaction = 0.74). Compared with current drinkers of 21 drinks/week. Results were similar after excluding binge drinkers. In a meta-analysis of 7 prospective studies, including 12,554 AF cases, the RRs were 1.08 (95% CI: 1.06 to 1.10) for 1 drink/day, 1.17 (95% CI: 1.13 to 1.21) for 2 drinks/day, 1.26 (95% CI: 1.19 to 1.33) for 3 drinks/day, 1.36 (95% CI: 1.27 to 1.46) for 4 drinks/day, and 1.47 (95% CI: 1.34 to 1.61) for 5 drinks/day, compared with nondrinkers.
These findings indicate that alcohol consumption, even at moderate intakes, is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 22;64(3):290-225034066
PubMed ID
25034065 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma: a prospective study of Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9191
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Dec 10;117(5):848-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2005
Author
Bahram Rashidkhani
Agneta Akesson
Per Lindblad
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2005 Dec 10;117(5):848-53
Date
Dec-10-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous literature, although not consistent, suggests that moderate alcohol consumption might be associated with decreased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in women. Thus, we examined the association between alcohol intake and the incidence of RCC by analyzing data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based prospective cohort of 59,237 women, aged 40-76 years, who, at baseline in 1987-1990, were cancer free and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire including questions about alcohol consumption. Through June 30, 2004, 132 incident cases of RCC were diagnosed. We used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate age and body mass index (BMI) adjusted rate ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Women who consumed >4.3 grams per day of alcohol (ethanol) had nonsignificantly lower risk of RCC than did women who consumed or = 55 years of age at entry into the cohort, corresponding risk estimates were RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.10-1.05, p for trend = 0.04 and among women with BMI >25 kg/m2, RR = 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.97, p for trend = 0.04. Consistent with these findings, women who drank 1 or more servings of total alcoholic beverages per week had lower RCC risk than did women who drank less (RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.41-0.94); the corresponding estimate for women > or = 55 years of age was RR = 0.44, 95% CI 0.22-0.88. Results from our prospective cohort study of middle-aged and elderly women indicate that moderate alcohol consumption may be associated with decreased risk of RCC.
PubMed ID
15957170 View in PubMed
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186 records – page 1 of 19.