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A comparison of self-perceived health status in inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome patients from a Canadian national population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157196
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 May;22(5):475-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Linda Y L Tang
Alice Nabalamba
Leslie A Graff
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2008 May;22(5):475-83
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Self Concept
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
To determine whether differences exist in perceptions of physical health, mental health and stress levels between patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
Data were obtained from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, which had a sample size of 132,947 Canadians. Information on 4441 participants aged 19 years or older who reported that they had been diagnosed with Crohn's disease (n=474), ulcerative colitis (n=637) or IBS (n=3330) was analyzed regarding perceptions of their physical health, mental health, stress levels and activity levels.
Overall, IBD patients reported being in fair to poor health (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
18478133 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Health Rep. 2007 Feb;18(1):23-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Alice Nabalamba
Wayne J Millar
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Alice.Nabalamba@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2007 Feb;18(1):23-35
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Culture
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Health status
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Office Visits - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization
Abstract
This article, based on the Andersen model, describes patterns of consultation with general practitioners (GPs) and specialists among Canadians aged 18 or older. Associations with health status and other factors are examined.
Estimates are based on data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), cycle 3.1.
Cross-tabulations were used to estimate the proportion of adult Canadians who had had a GP consultation, four or more GP consultations, or a specialist consultation in the previous year. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with such consultations when the effects of health need were taken into account.
In 2005, 77% of Canadians aged 18 to 64 and 88% of seniors reported that they had consulted a GP in the previous year; 25% and 44%, respectively, had done so four or more times; and 27% and 34% had consulted a specialist. Individual health need, as measured by the presence of chronic conditions and self-reported general and mental health, was a strong determinant of service use. However, when need was taken into account, physician consultations were independently associated with age, sex, household income, race, language, urban/rural residence and having a regular family doctor. Seniors aged 75 or older and rural residents had low odds of specialist consultations, but high odds of four or more GP consultations. Visible minorities and Aboriginal people had lower odds of reporting specialist consultations than did Whites.
PubMed ID
17441441 View in PubMed
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Hospitalization-based major comorbidity of inflammatory bowel disease in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161855
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):507-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Alice Nabalamba
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, Winnipeg, Canada. cbernst@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Can J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug;21(8):507-11
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Female
Hodgkin Disease - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - epidemiology
International Classification of Diseases
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
To define the patterns of hospitalization for known major comorbidities associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in Canada.
The data source was the Statistics Canada Health Person Oriented Information hospital database (1994/1995 to 2003/2004). The number of stays for a diagnosis of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis by the International Classification of Diseases, ninth edition, codes 555 or 556, or the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition, Canadian Enhancement, codes K50 or K51, was extracted. Age- and sex-specific and age-adjusted rates of hospitalization for selected IBD-related comorbidities were assessed.
Rates of Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were low in the hospitalized IBD population. Rates for colon cancer, rectal cancer, pulmonary emboli and deep venous thromboembolism were generally higher among IBD patients younger than 50 years of age compared with the non-IBD hospitalized population.
IBD was associated with life-threatening comorbidities such as venous thromboembolic disease and colon cancer among persons younger than 50 years of age to a greater extent than the general hospitalized population. Recent secular trends in rates of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas will need to be followed to determine whether the whole population, including IBD patients who receive immunomodulating therapies, are at increased risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17703250 View in PubMed
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Hospitalization, surgery, and readmission rates of IBD in Canada: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171226
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jan;101(1):110-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Charles N Bernstein
Alice Nabalamba
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and University of Manitoba Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical and Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Jan;101(1):110-8
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Colectomy - statistics & numerical data
Colitis, Ulcerative - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Crohn Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
We aimed to define the rates of hospitalization and readmission for inflammatory bowel disease in Canada.
The data source was Statistics Canada Person Oriented Information Database (1994-2001). The number of stays for a diagnosis of Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) by ICD-9-CM code 555 or 556 was extracted (and assessed when CD or UC was the first diagnosis or was 1 of 16 diagnoses on the patient discharge abstract). Age-, gender-, and disease-specific rates of hospitalization, length of stay, readmission, and surgery were assessed.
The age-adjusted hospitalization rate for CD declined over 1994-2001 from 29.2 to 26.9/100,000 but was stable for UC at 12.6-13.3 per 100,000. In the 7 yr, 39.4% of CD patients (21.3-24.0%/yr) and 33.7% of UC patients (18.5-20.3%/yr) got readmitted at least once. The average length of stay declined from 10.3 (1994-1995) to 9.1 days (2000-2001) (p = 0.029) in CD and in UC declined from 12.2 to 10.1 days (p = 0.054). Of all hospitalizations, major surgery occurred in 48% of CD (44.8-49.8% per yr) and 55% of UC (51.5-59.0% per yr).
Rates of hospitalization declined slightly for CD over the 7 yr but still remained twice as great as the rates for UC. Approximately 20% of CD and UC subjects got readmitted per year and over 7 yr approximately 35% got readmitted. Major surgery was a more common reason for hospitalization in UC than in CD.
PubMed ID
16405542 View in PubMed
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Inflammatory bowel disease--hospitalization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178561
Source
Health Rep. 2004 Jul;15(4):25-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Alice Nabalamba
Charles N Bernstein
Craig Seko
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa, Ontario. Alice.Nabalamba@statcan.ca
Source
Health Rep. 2004 Jul;15(4):25-40
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology
Crohn Disease - epidemiology
Databases, Factual
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Public Health Informatics
Time Factors
Abstract
This analysis examines trends in hospitalization for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
Data are from the Hospital Morbidity Database for 1983/84 to 2000/01, and from the Health Person-Oriented Information Database for 1994/95 to 2000/01.
Sex- and age-specific rates were calculated for separations attributed to Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Rates and hospital days were also calculated for hospitalizations in which IBD was among the first five diagnostic codes on a patient's discharge abstract. The frequency of rehospitalization was examined.
From the early 1980s to the mid-1990s, annual rates of hospitalization for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis rose slightly, but have since levelled off. Hospitalization rates for both conditions are highest among people in their twenties. The average length of stay for patients with either disease fell from about 2 weeks in 1983/84 to 9 or 10 days in 2000/01. More than a quarter of patients hospitalized for Crohn's disease and over 20% of those with ulcerative colitis were readmitted within the same year.
PubMed ID
15346726 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of mental disorders in a Canadian household population with dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143824
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Mar;37(2):186-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Alice Nabalamba
Scott B Patten
Author Affiliation
Statistics Canada, Health Statistics Division (AN), Ottawa, Ontario. nabalamb@yahoo.com
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Mar;37(2):186-94
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - complications - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Medical and mental health comorbidity in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias presents difficult challenges for health service delivery. However, existing studies have been conducted in clinical samples and may not be informative for planning community services. The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) provides an opportunity to characterize associations between dementias and mental and physical comorbidity in a household population aged 55 and over.
Data were obtained from the 2005 CCHS-cycle 3.1. Weighted estimates for mood and anxiety disorders and other characteristics in Canadian population with dementia were calculated and were compared to those in people without the condition.
According to the CCHS, the prevalence of Alzheimer' s disease and other dementia increases with age, more or less doubling every decade. The increase among women is monotonic, whereas among men in the household population the rate of dementia peaks at age 85-89 and falls thereafter. Mood and anxiety disorders were found to be substantially more frequent among people with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia compared to those without the disease (mood disorders: 19.5% vs. 5.3% and anxiety disorders: 16.3% vs. 4.0%). Heart disease, stroke and obesity were associated with dementia as was a lower level of education. Furthermore, people with dementia were more likely than those without the disease to report activity restrictions.
The high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in household population with Alzheimer's disease and other dementia demonstrates the burden of disease that is likely to worsen quality of life over time.
PubMed ID
20437928 View in PubMed
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Trends in management and outcomes of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: 1993-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166567
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Dec;4(12):1459-1466
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Laura E Targownik
Alice Nabalamba
Author Affiliation
Section of Gastroenterology, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba. targowni@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Dec;4(12):1459-1466
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Hemostasis, Surgical
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - trends
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - trends
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
ANVUGIB is a common reason for hospital admission and has been traditionally associated with a mortality rate of 5%-10%. There have been numerous innovations in the prevention and management of ANVUGIB in recent years, although the effect of these innovations on ANVUGIB incidence and outcomes is unknown.
We used the Statistics Canada's Health Person Oriented Information Database [corrected], which contains data characterizing every inpatient hospital admission in Canada between 1993 and 2003. We identified admissions consistent with nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding using both a broad and narrow ICD-9/ICD-10-based definition. Data were extracted concerning patient demographics, incidence of surgery for complications of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and overall mortality.
Between 1993 and 2003, ANVUGIB incidence decreased from 77.1 cases to 53.2 per 100,000/y for the broad definition, and from 52.4 to 34.3 cases per 100,000/y for the narrow definition. ANVUGIB incidence rose slightly in 2000, coincident with the introduction of COX-2 inhibitors. The proportion of ANVUGIB subjects requiring surgical intervention declined over the 10 years from 7.1% to 4.5%, although the rate of decline did not increase after the introduction of intravenous proton pump inhibitors (IV PPIs). The mortality rate remained steady at approximately 3.5%.
The incidence of ANVUGIB and the need for operative intervention has been steadily declining since 1993. ANVUGIB-associated mortality remained constant, although at a rate lower than traditionally reported. The impact of IV PPIs on mortality and operative intervention on a population-wide basis is likely minimal.
Notes
Erratum In: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2007 Mar;5(3):403
PubMed ID
17101296 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.