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Cancer incidence and mortality in Chukotka, 1997-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115336
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20470
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Hygiene Department, Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20470
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
File Size
160974
Keywords
Age Distribution
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - classification - ethnology - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The general aim was to assess cancer incidence and mortality among the general population of Chukotka in 1997-2010 and to compare it with the population of Russia.
Cancer data were abstracted from the annual statistical reports of the P.A. Hertzen Research Institute of Oncology in Moscow. The annual number and percent of cases, crude and age-standardized cancer incidence (ASIR) and mortality (ASMR) rates per 100,000 among men and women in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug were determined for the period 1997-2010 for incidence and 1999-2010 for mortality. Two years' data were aggregated to generate temporal trends during the period. In age-standardization, the Segi-Doll world standard population used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer was used.
The higher incidence and mortality rate of cancer (all sites combined) among men compared to women, which was observed in Russia nationally, was reflected also in Chukotka, although the difference between men and women was not statistically significant. Overall, the patterns of cancer sites are similar between Chukotka and Russia, with cancer of the lung/trachea/bronchus and stomach occupying the top ranks among men. Oesophageal cancer is common in Chukotka but not in Russia, whereas prostate cancer is common in Russia but not in Chukotka. Among women, breast cancer is either the commonest or second commonest cancer in terms of incidence or mortality in both Chukotka and Russia. Cancer of the lung/trachea/bronchi ranks higher in Chukotka than in Russia. The rate of cancer incidence and mortality for all sites combined during the 13-year period was relatively stable in Russia. Dividing the period into two halves, an increase among both men and women was observed in Chukotka for all sites combined, and also for colorectal cancer.
This paper presents previously unavailable cancer epidemiological data on Chukotka. They provide a basis for comparative studies across circumpolar regions and countries. With its small population, cancer rates in Chukotka tend to be highly unstable and fluctuate widely from year to year. Even when aggregated over a decade or more, only broad conclusions regarding patterns and trends can be made regarding some of the commonest cancer sites, or with all sites combined. Chukotka experienced substantial social and economic dislocations during the period under study, which could conceivably affect risk factor distribution and the quality of medical care.
PubMed ID
23518507 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality in the indigenous population of coastal Chukotka, 1961-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115323
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20471
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Hygiene Department, Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20471
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Neoplasms - ethnology - mortality
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The general aim was to assess the pattern and trend in cancer mortality among the indigenous people of coastal Chukotka during the period 1961-1990.
All cases of cancer deaths of indigenous residents of the Chukotsky district in the north-easternmost coast of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug were copied from personal death certificates. There were a total of 219 cancer deaths during the study period. The average annual number of cases, percent, crude, and age-standardized cancer mortality rates (ASMR) per 100,000 among men and women for all sites combined and selected sites were calculated. Data were aggregated into six 5-year periods to assess temporal trends. Direct age-standardization was performed with the Segi-Doll world standard population used by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
The indigenous Chukchi and Eskimo people living in Chukotsky district were at higher risk of death from cancer during the 30-year period between 1961 and 1990, with ASMR among men twice that of Russia, and among women 3.5 times higher. The excess can be attributed to the extremely high mortality from oesophageal cancer and lung cancer.
The indigenous people of coastal Chukotka were at very high risk of death from cancer relative to the Russian population nationally. The mortality data from this study correspond to the pattern of incidence reported among other indigenous people of the Russian Arctic. Little information is available since 1990, and the feasibility of ethnic-specific health data is now severely limited.
Notes
Cites: Arctic Med Res. 1996;55 Suppl 1:32-48871684
Cites: Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):617-98813070
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1993 Jul 30;54(6):889-948335395
PubMed ID
23519821 View in PubMed
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Dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants and metals among Inuit and Chukchi in Russian Arctic Chukotka.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122663
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18592
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
  1 document  
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St-Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:18592
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
4941326
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Food Safety
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Inuits
Male
Metals - isolation & purification
Organic Chemicals - isolation & purification
Population Groups
Risk Reduction Behavior
Russia
Abstract
The general aim was to assess dietary exposure to selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among Eskimo (Inuit) and Chukchi of the Chukotka Peninsula of the Russian Arctic, and to establish recommendations for exposure risk reduction.
A cross-sectional evaluation of nutritional patterns of coastal and inland indigenous peoples of the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (in 2001-2003); assessment of the levels of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) in traditional foods and their comparison to Russian food safety limits; the identification of local sources of food contamination; and the recommendation and implementation of risk management measures.
Community-based dietary survey of self reported food frequencies (453 persons), chemical analyses (POPs and metals) of local foods and indoor matters (397 samples), substantiation of recommendations for daily (weekly, monthly) intakes of traditional food.
POPs in traditional food items are generally below the Russian food safety limits except marine mammal fat, while Hg and Cd are high mainly in mammal viscera. Lead is relatively low in tissues of all animals studied. For the Chukotka coastal communities, seals constitute the principal source of the whole suite of PTSs considered. Consumption restrictions are recommended for marine and freshwater fish, some wild meats (waterfowl and seal), fats (whale and seal), liver (most animals) and kidney (reindeer, walrus and seal). Evidence is presented that contamination of foodstuffs may be significantly increased during storing/processing/cooking of food due to indoor and outdoor environmental conditions.
Based on the analytical findings and the local PTSs sources identified, guidelines on food safety are suggested, as well as measures to reduce food contamination and domestic and local sources. Important and urgent remedial actions are recommended to minimize PTSs environmental and domestic contamination. Waste clean-up activities started in coastal Chukotka in 2007.
Notes
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2003 Aug;5(4):689-9612948250
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1999 Jun 1;230(1-3):1-8210466227
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2009 Sep 15;407(19):5216-2219608216
Cites: J Environ Monit. 2007 Aug;9(8):884-9317671671
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:179-8215736647
PubMed ID
22789517 View in PubMed
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A follow-up study of blood levels of persistent toxic substances (PTS) among indigenous peoples of coastal Chukotka, Russia, 2001-2007

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284587
Source
Pages 263-268 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Alexey A. Dudarev
Valery S. Chupakhin
Jon Oyvind Odland
Lars-Otto Reiersen
Valery P. Chashchin
Author Affiliation
The North-West Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia
The AMAP Secretariate, Oslo, Norway
The University of Tromso, Norway
Source
Pages 263-268 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Polychlorinated Biphenyls
Persistent organic pollutants
Persistent toxic substances
Maternal-cord blood
Breastfeeding
Infectious diseases
Abstract
Objectives: The Russian Arctic persistent toxic substance (PTS) study has revealed that some of the highest levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and lead are in the blood of the Indigenous populations of coastal Chukotka. A follow-up study was undertaken during 2007. Study design: Individual data on PTS levels of blood samples from 17 mothers and cord blood from their corresponding babies born in the Chukotka coastal area in 2001-2002 were compared with PTS levels in blood sampled from the same women and their five-year old children in 2007. The possible influence of breastfeeding on maternal POPs serum levels and association of children's POPs blood levels and frequency of infectious diseases has been assessed. Methods: Chemical analysis of all samples was performed in the "Typhoon" laboratory. Health data were collected from the mothers' medical files, newborns' delivery records and mothers' questionnaires. Results: Maternal blood levels of POPs during the five-year period have decreased significantly (by 33%-74%)1 blood levels of Pb have decreased by 21%1 while mercury levels remained the same. The infant blood serum levels of most POPs during five-year period have increased considerably; the blood lead levels have not changed, while mercury levels decreased by 31%. Conclusions: Decline of the levels of POPs in maternal blood serum might be due to breastfeeding, but no associations have been found. Increment of POPs levels in infants' blood might be explained by prolonged breastfeeding and consumption of local food. No correlations between infants' POPs blood levels and frequency of infectious diseases has been demonstrated.
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Food and water security issues in Russia I: food security in the general population of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105147
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Eugenia V Dushkina
Yuliya N Sladkova
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Tatijana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21848
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Diet - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Far East - epidemiology
Food Contamination - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Food Microbiology - statistics & numerical data
Food Safety
Food Supply - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Malnutrition - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Requirements - physiology
Russia - epidemiology
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
Problems related to food security in Russian Arctic (dietary imbalance, predominance of carbohydrates, shortage of milk products, vegetables and fruits, deficit of vitamins and microelements, chemical, infectious and parasitic food contamination) have been defined in the literature. But no standard protocol of food security assessment has been used in the majority of studies.
Our aim was to obtain food security indicators, identified within an Arctic collaboration, for selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, and to compare food safety in these territories.
In 18 regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, the following indicators of food security were analyzed: food costs, food consumption, and chemical and biological food contamination for the period 2000-2011.
Food costs in the regions are high, comprising 23-43% of household income. Only 4 out of 10 food groups (fish products, cereals, sugar, plant oil) are consumed in sufficient amounts. The consumption of milk products, eggs, vegetables, potatoes, fruits (and berries) is severely low in a majority of the selected regions. There are high levels of biological contamination of food in many regions. The biological and chemical contamination situation is alarming, especially in Chukotka. Only 7 food pollutants are under regular control; among pesticides, only DDT. Evenki AO and Magadan Oblast have reached peak values in food contaminants compared with other regions. Mercury in local fish has not been analyzed in the majority of the regions. In 3 regions, no monitoring of DDT occurs. Aflatoxins have not been analyzed in 5 regions. Nitrates had the highest percentage in excess of the hygienic threshold in all regions. Excesses of other pollutants in different regions were episodic and as a rule not high.
Improvement of the food supply and food accessibility in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East is of utmost importance. Both quantitative and qualitative control of chemical and biological contaminants in food is insufficient and demands radical enhancement aimed at improving food security.
Notes
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2000;69(1-2):32-410943002
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2001;70(2):13-711494664
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2004 Jul-Aug;(4):15-815318602
Cites: Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Jan-Mar;(1):52-48700016
Cites: Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1996;(6):16-98925227
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2005 Mar-Apr;(2):37-4115915898
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2008 May-Jun;(3):14-518590141
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2008;77(3):64-718669334
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2008;77(5):65-819048893
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2009;78(1):54-819348284
Cites: Vopr Pitan. 2009;78(5):31-420120967
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2010 Jul-Aug;(4):43-620873385
Cites: Parazitologiia. 2010 Jul-Aug;44(4):336-4221061592
Cites: Parazitologiia. 2010 Sep-Oct;44(5):406-1821309146
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1859222789517
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
PubMed ID
24471055 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia III: food- and waterborne diseases in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105572
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21856
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Eugenia V Dushkina
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Yuliya N Sladkova
Tatjana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Evengard
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:21856
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Far East - epidemiology
Food Contamination
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Russia - epidemiology
Sanitation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Sewage - adverse effects
Siberia - epidemiology
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The food- and waterborne disease situation in Russia requires special attention. Poor quality of centralized water supplies and sewage systems, biological and chemical contamination of drinking water, as well as contamination of food products, promote widespread infectious diseases, significantly exceeding nationwide rates in the population living in the two-thirds of Russian northern territories.
The general aim was to assess the levels of food- and waterborne diseases in selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (for the period 2000-2011), and to compare disease levels among regions and with national levels in Russia.
This study is the first comparative assessment of the morbidity in these fields of the population of 18 selected regions of Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East, using official statistical sources. The incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases among the general population (including indigenous peoples) have been analyzed in selected regions (per 100,000 of population, averaged for 2000-2011).
Among compulsory registered infectious and parasitic diseases, there were high rates and widespread incidences in selected regions of shigellosis, yersiniosis, hepatitis A, tularaemia, giardiasis, enterobiasis, ascariasis, diphyllobothriasis, opistorchiasis, echinococcosis and trichinellosis.
Incidences of infectious and parasitic food- and waterborne diseases in the general population of selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and the Far East (2000-2011) are alarmingly high. Parallel solutions must be on the agenda, including improvement of sanitary conditions of cities and settlements in the regions, modernization of the water supply and of the sewage system. Provision and monitoring of the quality of the drinking water, a reform of the general healthcare system and the epidemiological surveillance (including gender-divided statistics), enhancement of laboratory diagnostics and the introduction of preventive actions are urgently needed.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2002 Jan-Feb;(1):6611899884
PubMed ID
24350064 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia II: water security in general population of Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105571
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22646
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Eugenia V Dushkina
Yuliya N Sladkova
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Tatjana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Birgitta Evengard
Lena M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22646
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Drinking
Drinking Water - analysis - microbiology
Far East
Humans
Russia
Sanitation - methods - standards
Sewage - analysis
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Poor state of water supply systems, shortage of water purification facilities and disinfection systems, low quality of drinking water generally in Russia and particularly in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East have been defined in the literature. However, no standard protocol of water security assessment has been used in the majority of studies.
Uniform water security indicators collected from Russian official statistical sources for the period 2000-2011 were used for comparison for 18 selected regions in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East. The following indicators of water security were analyzed: water consumption, chemical and biological contamination of water reservoirs of Categories I and II of water sources (centralized--underground and surface, and non-centralized) and of drinking water.
Water consumption in selected regions fluctuated from 125 to 340 L/person/day. Centralized water sources (both underground and surface sources) are highly contaminated by chemicals (up to 40-80%) and biological agents (up to 55% in some regions), mainly due to surface water sources. Underground water sources show relatively low levels of biological contamination, while chemical contamination is high due to additional water contamination during water treatment and transportation in pipelines. Non-centralized water sources are highly contaminated (both chemically and biologically) in 32-90% of samples analyzed. Very high levels of chemical contamination of drinking water (up to 51%) were detected in many regions, mainly in the north-western part of the Russian Arctic. Biological contamination of drinking water was generally much lower (2.5-12%) everywhere except Evenki AO (27%), and general and thermotolerant coliform bacteria predominated in drinking water samples from all regions (up to 17.5 and 12.5%, correspondingly). The presence of other agents was much lower: Coliphages--0.2-2.7%, Clostridia spores, Giardia cysts, pathogenic bacteria, Rotavirus--up to 0.8%. Of a total of 56 chemical pollutants analyzed in water samples from centralized water supply systems, 32 pollutants were found to be in excess of hygienic limits, with the predominant pollutants being Fe (up to 55%), Cl (up to 57%), Al (up to 43%) and Mn (up to 45%).
In 18 selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East Category I and II water reservoirs, water sources (centralized--underground, surface; non-centralized) and drinking water are highly contaminated by chemical and biological agents. Full-scale reform of the Russian water industry and water security system is urgently needed, especially in selected regions.
Notes
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2008 May-Jun;(3):16-818590142
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2000 Apr;66(4):1724-510742269
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2008 Sep-Oct;(5):32-419086221
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2000 May-Jun;(3):17-910900788
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):91-521842746
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):10-521842728
Cites: Water Res. 2012 Mar 15;46(4):921-3322209280
PubMed ID
24350065 View in PubMed
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Health and society in Chukotka: an overview.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115335
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Valery S Chupakhin
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Centre, St. Petersburg, Russia. alexey.d@inbox.ru
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:20469
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Climate
Delivery of Health Care
Economic development
Health status
Humans
Industry
Mortality
Population Dynamics
Research
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This study provides a historical overview of the changes in the socio-economic and health status of the population of Chukotka, from the Soviet to the post-Soviet period, with special attention paid to the circumstances of indigenous people. Past health studies in Chukotka are reviewed and key demographic and health indicator data presented. Since the 1990s, Chukotka's population has shrunk to a third of its former size due to emigration of non-indigenous and mostly younger people, with a corresponding increase in the mortality rate due to aging of the population. However, the indigenous population has remained stable. Among the most important causes of mortality are injuries. The living conditions of indigenous people continue to be a cause of concern, beset by high rates of poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, suicide and a variety of infectious diseases, such as tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections. The economy, general infrastructure and health care system of Chukotka have been considerably improved by the Abramovich administration in the 2000s.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):584-9322152597
Cites: Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1996 Jan-Mar;(1):52-48700016
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004 Sep;63(3):235-4215526927
Cites: Probl Tuberk. 2002;(3):3-612066530
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Jan;83(1):58-6914678087
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1992 Aug;21(4):730-61521978
Cites: BMC Cancer. 2005;5:8216029510
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Suppl 1:325-810093300
PubMed ID
23518623 View in PubMed
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The Impact of a Nickel-Copper Smelter on Concentrations of Toxic Elements in Local Wild Food from the Norwegian, Finnish, and Russian Border Regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283350
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Jun 28;14(7)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-2017
Author
Martine D Hansen
Therese H Nøst
Eldbjørg S Heimstad
Anita Evenset
Alexey A Dudarev
Arja Rautio
Päivi Myllynen
Eugenia V Dushkina
Marta Jagodic
Guttorm N Christensen
Erik E Anda
Magritt Brustad
Torkjel M Sandanger
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Jun 28;14(7)
Date
Jun-28-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Toxic elements emitted from the Pechenganickel complex on the Kola Peninsula have caused concern about potential effects on local wild food in the border regions between Norway, Finland and Russia. The aim of this study was to assess Ni, Cu, Co, As, Pb, Cd, and Hg concentrations in local wild foods from these border regions. During 2013-2014, we collected samples of different berry, mushroom, fish, and game species from sites at varying distances from the Ni-Cu smelter in all three border regions. Our results indicate that the Ni-Cu smelter is the main source of Ni, Co, and As in local wild foods, whereas the sources of Pb and Cd are more complex. We observed no consistent trends for Cu, one of the main toxic elements emitted by the Ni-Cu smelter; nor did we find any trend for Hg in wild food. Concentrations of all investigated toxic elements were highest in mushrooms, except for Hg, which was highest in fish. EU maximum levels of Pb, Cd, and Hg were exceeded in some samples, but most had levels considered safe for human consumption. No international thresholds exist for the other elements under study.
PubMed ID
28657608 View in PubMed
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Indicators of food and water security in an Arctic Health context--results from an international workshop discussion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108075
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
James Berner
Alexey A Dudarev
Gert Mulvad
Jon Øyvind Odland
Alan Parkinson
Arja Rautio
Constantine Tikhonov
Birgitta Evengård
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Centre, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Body Weight
Environmental monitoring
Food Safety
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In August 2012, a literature search with the aim of describing indicators on food and water security in an Arctic health context was initialized in collaboration between the Arctic Human Health Expert Group, SDWG/AHHEG and the AMAP (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme within the Arctic Council) Human Health Assessment Group, AMAP/HHAG. In December 2012, workshop discussions were performed with representatives from both of these organizations, including 7 Arctic countries. The aim of this article is to describe the workshop discussions and the rational for the 12 indicators selected and the 9 rejected and to discuss the potential feasibility of these. Advantages and disadvantages of candidate indicators were listed. Informative value and costs for collecting were estimated separately on a 3-level scale: low, medium and high. Based on these reviews, the final selection of promoted and rejected indicators was performed and summarized in tables. Among 10 suggested indicators of food security, 6 were promoted: healthy weight, traditional food proportion in diet, monetary food costs, non-monetary food accessibility, food-borne diseases and food-related contaminants. Four were rejected: per-person dietary energy supply, food security modules, self-estimated food safety and healthy eating. Among 10 suggested indicators of water security, 6 were promoted: per-capita renewable water, accessibility of running water, waterborne diseases, drinking-water-related contaminants, authorized water quality assurance and water safety plans. Four were rejected: water consumption, types of water sources, periodic water shortages and household water costs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
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