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The acute care nurse practitioner role in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135437
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:114-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Kelley Kilpatrick
Patricia Harbman
Nancy Carter
Ruth Martin-Misener
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Faith Donald
Sharon Kaasalainen
Ivy Bourgeault
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Université du Québec en Outaouais, CHSRF/CIHR Program in Advanced Practice Nursing, St-Jérôme, QC.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:114-39
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Advanced Practice Nursing - education - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Nurse Practitioners - education - organization & administration - standards
Nurse's Role
Quebec
Abstract
The acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) role was developed in Canada in the late 1980s to offset rapidly increasing physician workloads in acute care settings and to address the lack of continuity of care for seriously ill patients and increased complexity of care delivery. These challenges provided an opportunity to develop an advanced practice nursing role to care for critically ill patients with the intent of improving continuity of care and patient outcomes. For this paper, we drew on the ACNP-related findings of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing. The synthesis revealed that ACNPs are working in a range of clinical settings. While ACNPs are trained at the master's level, there is a gap in specialty education for ACNPs. Important barriers to the full integration of ACNP roles into the Canadian healthcare system include lack of full utilization of role components, limitations to scope of practice, inconsistent team acceptance and funding issues. Facilitators to ACNP role implementation include clear communication about the role, with messages tailored to the specific information needs of various stakeholder groups; supportive leadership of healthcare managers; and stable and predictable funding. The status of ACNP roles continues to evolve across Canada. Ongoing leadership and continuing research are required to enhance the integration of these roles into our healthcare system.
PubMed ID
21478690 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' perceptions of inpatient postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165660
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Wendy Sword
Cathy Charles
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) program, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2007 Feb;17(2):201-12
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Breast Feeding - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant care
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Maternal-Child Nursing - standards
Mothers - education - psychology
Narration
Nurse-Patient Relations
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - psychology - standards
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - psychology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - psychology
Abstract
The authors used a transcendental phenomenological approach to describe adolescent mothers' satisfactory and unsatisfactory inpatient postpartum nursing care experiences. They analyzed data from 14 in-depth interviews and found that adolescent mothers' satisfaction is dependent on their perceptions of the nurse's ability to place them "at ease." Nursing care qualities that contributed to satisfactory experiences included nurses' sharing information about themselves, being calm, demonstrating confidence in mothers, speaking to adolescent and adult mothers in the same way, and anticipating unstated needs. Nursing care was perceived to be unsatisfactory when it was too serious, limited to the job required, or different from care to adult mothers, or when nurses failed to recognize individual needs. In extreme cases, unsatisfactory experiences hindered development of an effective nurse-client relationship. These findings illustrate the value of qualitative inquiry for understanding patients' satisfaction with care, can be used for self-reflection, and have implications for nursing education programs.
PubMed ID
17220391 View in PubMed
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Advanced practice nursing in Canada: overview of a decision support synthesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135441
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:15-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Alba DiCenso
Ruth Martin-Misener
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Ivy Bourgeault
Kelley Kilpatrick
Faith Donald
Sharon Kaasalainen
Patricia Harbman
Nancy Carter
Sandra Kioke
Julia Abelson
R James McKinlay
Dianna Pasic
Brandi Wasyluk
Julie Vohra
Renee Charbonneau-Smith
Author Affiliation
Ontario Training Centre in Health Services & Policy Research, Nursing and Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:15-34
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - classification - methods - organization & administration
Canada
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - classification - organization & administration
Focus Groups
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Humans
Leadership
Nurse Clinicians - classification - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - classification - organization & administration
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Publishing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The objective of this decision support synthesis was to identify and review published and grey literature and to conduct stakeholder interviews to (1) describe the distinguishing characteristics of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) role definitions and competencies relevant to Canadian contexts, (2) identify the key barriers and facilitators for the effective development and utilization of CNS and NP roles and (3) inform the development of evidence-based recommendations for the individual, organizational and system supports required to better integrate CNS and NP roles into the Canadian healthcare system and advance the delivery of nursing and patient care services in Canada. Four types of advanced practice nurses (APNs) were the focus: CNSs, primary healthcare nurse practitioners (PHCNPs), acute care nurse practitioners (ACNPs) and a blended CNS/NP role. We worked with a multidisciplinary, multijurisdictional advisory board that helped identify documents and key informant interviewees, develop interview questions and formulate implications from our findings. We included 468 published and unpublished English- and French-language papers in a scoping review of the literature. We conducted interviews in English and French with 62 Canadian and international key informants (APNs, healthcare administrators, policy makers, nursing regulators, educators, physicians and other team members). We conducted four focus groups with a total of 19 APNs, educators, administrators and policy makers. A multidisciplinary roundtable convened by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation formulated evidence-informed policy and practice recommendations based on the synthesis findings. This paper forms the foundation for this special issue, which contains 10 papers summarizing different dimensions of our synthesis. Here, we summarize the synthesis methods and the recommendations formulated at the roundtable.
PubMed ID
21478685 View in PubMed
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The clinical nurse specialist role in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135436
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:140-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Nancy Carter
Kelley Kilpatrick
Ruth Martin-Misener
Faith Donald
Sharon Kaasalainen
Patricia Harbman
Ivy Bourgeault
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Oncology, McMaster University, CHSRF/CIHR Program in Advanced Practice Nursing, Canadian Centre of Excellence in Oncology Advanced Practice Nursing at the Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:140-66
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education - organization & administration - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Credentialing
Decision Support Techniques
Delivery of Health Care
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Humans
Leadership
Nurse Clinicians - education - organization & administration - standards
Nurse's Role
Abstract
The clinical nurse specialist (CNS) provides an important clinical leadership role for the nursing profession and broader healthcare system; yet the prominence and deployment of this role have fluctuated in Canada over the past 40 years. This paper draws on the results of a decision support synthesis examining advanced practice nursing roles in Canada. The synthesis included a scoping review of the Canadian and international literature and in-depth interviews with key informants including CNSs, nurse practitioners, other health providers, educators, healthcare administrators, nursing regulators and government policy makers. Key challenges to the full integration of CNSs in the Canadian healthcare system include the paucity of Canadian research to inform CNS role implementation, absence of a common vision for the CNS role in Canada, lack of a CNS credentialing mechanism and limited access to CNS-specific graduate education. Recommendations for maximizing the potential and long-term sustainability of the CNS role to achieve important patient, provider and health system outcomes in Canada are provided.
PubMed ID
21478691 View in PubMed
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Clinical nurse specialists and nurse practitioners: title confusion and lack of role clarity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135434
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:189-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Faith Donald
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Ruth Martin-Misener
Sharon Kaasalainen
Kelley Kilpatrick
Nancy Carter
Patricia Harbman
Ivy Bourgeault
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Affiliate Faculty, Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, CHSRF/CIHR Program in Advanced Practice Nursing, Toronto, ON.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:189-201
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Awareness
Canada
Curriculum
Focus Groups
Health Policy
Humans
Nurse Clinicians - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Social Perception
Abstract
Title confusion and lack of role clarity pose barriers to the integration of advanced practice nursing roles (i.e., clinical nurse specialist [CNS] and nurse practitioner [NP]). Lack of awareness and understanding about NP and CNS roles among the healthcare team and the public contributes to ambiguous role expectations, confusion about NP and CNS scopes of practice and turf protection. This paper draws on the results of a scoping review of the literature and qualitative key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis commissioned by the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation and the Office of Nursing Policy in Health Canada. The goal of this synthesis was to develop a better understanding of advanced practice nursing roles and the factors that influence their effective development and integration in the Canadian healthcare system. Specific recommendations from interview participants and the literature to enhance title and role clarity included the use of consistent titles for NP and CNS roles; the creation of a vision statement to articulate the role of CNSs and NPs across settings; the use of a systematic planning process to guide role development and implementation; the development of a communication strategy to educate healthcare professionals, the public and employers about the roles; attention to inter-professional team dynamics when introducing these new roles; and addressing inter-professionalism in all health professional education program curricula.
PubMed ID
21478694 View in PubMed
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A comparison of adolescent and adult mothers' satisfaction with their postpartum nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186389
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):117-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Wendy E Peterson
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Clinical Health Sciences (Nursing) Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. wpetersn@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;34(4):117-27
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Marital status
Nursing Care - standards
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Postnatal Care - standards
Quality of Health Care
Abstract
The purpose of this matched-cohort survey was to determine whether there is a difference between unmarried adolescent mothers and married adult mothers in terms of satisfaction with inpatient postpartum nursing care. Eighty adolescent/adult postpartum mother pairs from a mid-sized teaching hospital were matched according to parity, mode of delivery, infant health status, and infant feeding method. Adolescents scored lower than adults on both the Experiences of Nursing Care Scale and the Satisfaction with Nursing Care Scale of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales. Among the adolescents, post-caesarean mothers were less satisfied than mothers who had delivered vaginally. Adolescent mothers' dissatisfaction with nurse availability and nurse-client communication are possible explanatory factors. Future qualitative studies will inform the design of interventions to improve satisfaction among adolescent mothers.
PubMed ID
12619483 View in PubMed
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Continuing education for primary health care nurse practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121649
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 Apr;33(4):353-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Pamela Baxter
Alba DiCenso
Faith Donald
Ruth Martin-Misener
Joanne Opsteen
Tracey Chambers
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Room HSC 3N28C, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1. baxterp@mcmaster.ca
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2013 Apr;33(4):353-7
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Satisfaction
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education, Distance
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Female
Humans
Internet
Male
Needs Assessment
Nurse Practitioners - education
Ontario
Primary Health Care - manpower
Abstract
The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing offers a nine-university, consortium-based primary health care nurse practitioner education program and on-line continuing education courses for primary health care nurse practitioners. Our study sought to determine the continuing education needs of primary health care nurse practitioners across Ontario, how best to meet these needs, and the barriers they face in completing continuing education. Surveys were completed by 83 (40%) of 209 learners who had participated in continuing education offered by the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing between 2004 and 2007. While 83% (n=50) of nurse practitioners surveyed indicated that continuing education was extremely important to them, they also identified barriers to engaging in continuing education offerings including; time intensity of the courses, difficulty taking time off work, family obligations, finances and fatigue. The most common reason for withdrawal from a continuing education offering was the difficulty of balancing work and study demands. Continuing education opportunities are important to Ontario primary health care nurse practitioners, and on-line continuing education offerings have been well received, but in order to be taken up by their target audience they must be relevant, readily accessible, flexible, affordable and offered over brief, intense periods of time using technology that is easy to use and Internet sites that are easily navigated.
PubMed ID
22889580 View in PubMed
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Education of advanced practice nurses in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135439
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:61-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Ruth Martin-Misener
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Patricia Harbman
Faith Donald
Sharon Kaasalainen
Nancy Carter
Kelley Kilpatrick
Alba DiCenso
Author Affiliation
Graduate Programs, School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:61-84
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education - trends
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Decision Support Techniques
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Focus Groups
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Nurse Clinicians - organization & administration
Nurse Practitioners - organization & administration
Abstract
In Canada, education programs for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and nurse practitioner (NP) roles began 40 years ago. NP programs are offered in almost all provinces. Education for the CNS role has occurred through graduate nursing programs generically defined as providing preparation for advanced nursing practice. For this paper, we drew on pertinent sections of a scoping review of the literature and key informant interviews conducted for a decision support synthesis on advanced practice nursing to describe the following: (1) history of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (2) current status of advanced practice nursing education in Canada, (3) curriculum issues, (4) interprofessional education, (5) resources for education and (6) continuing education. Although national frameworks defining advanced nursing practice and NP competencies provide some direction for education programs, Canada does not have countrywide standards of education for either the NP or CNS role. Inconsistency in the educational requirements for primary healthcare NPs continues to cause significant problems and interferes with inter-jurisdictional licensing portability. For both CNSs and NPs, there can be a mismatch between a generalized education and specialized practice. The value of interprofessional education in facilitating effective teamwork is emphasized. Recommendations for future directions for advanced practice nursing education are offered.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2010 Dec;23 Spec No 2010:85-721478688
PubMed ID
21478687 View in PubMed
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Effect of coronary artery bypass graft surgery on older women's health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187766
Source
Heart Lung. 2002 Nov-Dec;31(6):421-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fulvia G Baldassarre
Heather M Arthur
Alba Dicenso
Gordon Guyatt
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Heart Lung. 2002 Nov-Dec;31(6):421-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology - rehabilitation
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine if health-related quality of life (HRQL) improves after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in older women.
The study design was longitudinal observational.
The study took place in a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Study participants included 34 women 61 years or older who had elective or urgent CABG surgery for the first time. OUTSOME MEASURES: The 2 measures of HRQL were the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 and the Feeling Thermometer (FT). The Short Form-36 is composed of 8 subscales that are summarized into the Physical and the Mental Composite Scores. The FT is a utility measure that rates patients' preferences for different health states.
HRQL of older women was improved after CABG surgery: 7.79 points in the physical composite scores (P = .001), 7.26 in the mental composite scores (P = .008), and 29.77 points in the FT scores (P
PubMed ID
12434143 View in PubMed
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Evaluating health-related quality of life and priority health problems in patients with prostate cancer: a strategy for defining the role of the advanced practice nurse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144421
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2010;20(1):5-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Denise Bryant-Lukosius
Gina Browne
Alba DiCenso
Tim Whelan
Amiram Gafni
Alan Neville
Jinka Sathya
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Oncology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON. bryantl@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2010;20(1):5-14
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Ontario
Prostatic Neoplasms - nursing
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Abstract
A framework for the introduction and evaluation of APN roles emphasizes the importance of a systematic approach to role development based on the assessment of patient health needs. This study determined the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of patients with prostate cancer. The most frequent and severe patient health problems and their perceptions of priority health problems were identified and compared across five patient groups as a strategy to inform the supportive care role of the advanced oncology nurse for patients with advanced prostate cancer. The study found that the majority of men with early stage and advanced hormone sensitive prostate cancer can expect to enjoy good quality of life for several years following diagnosis. These two patient groups have common priority needs for improving their health related to sexual function, urinary frequency, urinary incontinence, and physical activity. Both groups may benefit from an advanced practice nursing (APN) role that can provide episodic supportive care for health problems occurring at different treatment stages. Conversely, it was found that men with advanced hormone refractory prostate cancer experience significantly poorer HRQL and have multiple severe health problems. These patients also have different priority needs including problems related to pain, fatigue, and decreased physical activity. Because of this, the focus of supportive care programs and interventions in advanced prostate cancer will differ for those with hormone refractory disease. They may benefit more from an APN role that can provide ongoing rather than episodic supportive care to assess and manage the multiple, new, and worsening health problems associated with progressive disease.
PubMed ID
20369640 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.