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Persistence of antibody to hepatitis B and protection from disease among Alaska natives immunized at birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5622
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Sep;24(9):786-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Catherine M Dentinger
Brian J McMahon
Jay C Butler
Charlotte E Dunaway
Carolyn L Zanis
Lisa R Bulkow
Dana L Bruden
Omana V Nainan
Marina L Khristova
Thomas W Hennessy
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK, USA.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2005 Sep;24(9):786-92
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alaska - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis B - ethnology - immunology - prevention & control
Hepatitis B Antibodies - blood - immunology
Hepatitis B Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Immunity - physiology
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alaska Native (AN) children were at high risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection before vaccination began in 1983. We evaluated the long-term protection from hepatitis B (HB) vaccination among AN children immunized when infants. METHODS: During 1984-1995, we recruited a convenience sample of AN children who had received a three dose series of HB vaccine starting at birth and had serum antibody to hepatitis B (anti-HBs) concentrations of >/= 10 mIU/mL at 7-26 months of age. We evaluated anti-HBs concentrations and the presence of anti-HBc in participants' sera every other year up to age 16 years. Anti-HB core antigen (anti-HBc)-positive specimens were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen and for HBV DNA. RESULTS: We followed 334 children for 3151 person-years (median, 10 years per child) with 1610 specimens collected. Anti-HBs concentrations dropped rapidly among all participants. Among children 2, 5 and 10 years of age, 37 of 79 (47%), 33 of 176 (19%) and 8 of 95 (8%), respectively, had anti-HBs concentrations of >/= 10 mIU/mL. Receipt of recombinant vaccine was significantly associated with a more rapid antibody decline (P
PubMed ID
16148845 View in PubMed
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Reemergence, in southwestern Alaska, of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type b disease due to strains indistinguishable from those isolated from vaccinated children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5822
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;186(7):958-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2002
Author
Lynne A Lucher
Michael Reeves
Thomas Hennessy
Orin S Levine
Tanja Popovic
Nancy Rosenstein
Alan J Parkinson
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2002 Oct 1;186(7):958-65
Date
Oct-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Carrier State - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Epidemiology, Molecular
Genotype
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Haemophilus influenzae type b - genetics - isolation & purification
Humans
Infant
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Vaccination
Abstract
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) invasive disease and oropharyngeal carriage continue in rural Alaska despite widespread vaccination. This study investigated whether invasive-disease reemergence during 1996-1997 could be attributed to strains distinguishable from strains carried by vaccinated children. Twenty-four invasive and 42 carriage Hib isolates, collected during 1992-1997, were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus enzyme electrophoresis, and biotyping. This Hib population was highly clonal, since only 2 strains, electrophoretic type (ET) 55/PFGE 1 and ET 56/PFGE 3, accounted for 62% of all isolates. The ET 55/PFGE 1 and ET 56/PFGE 3 strains were found in 74% of the carriers and caused 80% of the invasive Hib disease that occurred during April 1996-March 1997. Strains causing invasive disease could not be distinguished from strains carried by vaccinated children. Continued monitoring of Hib carriage may provide insights into the epidemiology of continued transmission in an era of widespread vaccination.
PubMed ID
12232836 View in PubMed
Less detail