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The adequacy of pharmaceutical treatment of schizophrenia in Quebec varies with age, but is not influenced by sex or neighbourhood deprivation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107816
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Frederieke M Brouwers
Josiane Courteau
Jean-Pierre Grégoire
Jocelyne Moisan
Sophie Lauzier
Alain Lesage
Marie-Josée Fleury
Alain Vanasse
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2013 Aug;58(8):456-65
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Though high discontinuation rates for antipsychotics (APs) by patients with schizophrenia are frequently reported, the percentage of patients receiving pharmaceutical treatment for schizophrenia in routine practice in accordance with international clinical guidelines is unknown. Further, it is unknown if these rates are influenced by levels of neighbourhood deprivation or by a patient's age or sex. Our study aims to investigate if inequalities in AP treatment could be observed between patients living in neighbourhoods with the highest levels of material and social deprivation and those with the lowest deprivation levels, between patients from different age groups, or between men and women.
We conducted a secondary analysis of medical-administrative data of a cohort of adult patients in the province of Quebec with a medical contact for schizophrenia in a 2-year period (2004-2005). We assessed the proportion of patients that filled at least 1 prescription for an AP and received adequate pharmaceutical treatment, defined as being in possession of APs at least 80% of the time as outpatients during a 2-year follow-up period.
Among the 30 544 study patients, 88.5% filled at least 1 prescription for an AP, and 67.5% of the treated patients received adequate treatment. Though no clinically significant differences were observed by deprivation or sex, younger age was associated with lower proportions of patients receiving adequate treatment (46% of treated patients aged between 18 and 29 years, compared with 72% aged between 30 and 64 years, and 77% aged 65 years and over).
In Quebec's routine practice, over 70% of treated patients aged 30 and over received adequate pharmacological treatment, regardless of sex or neighbourhood socioeconomic status. In contrast, in patients aged between 18 and 29 years this percentage was 47%. This is a discouraging finding, especially because optimal treatment in the early phase of disease is reported to result in the best long-term outcomes.
PubMed ID
23972107 View in PubMed
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Agreement between staff and service users concerning the clientele's mental health needs: a Quebec study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167409
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;51(5):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Marie-Josée Fleury
Guy Grenier
Alain Lesage
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. flemar@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;51(5):281-6
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards - utilization
Needs Assessment
Professional-Patient Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article examines the differences found between clientele with severe mental health problems and their key health workers in terms of assessing service users' needs in 6 Quebec service areas.
We questioned 165 pairs of users and staff, using the Camberwell Assessment of Needs questionnaire. The profile of serious and overall problems encountered by clientele from each of the sites was compared.
The sites with the greatest degree of user-staff agreement in identifying problems were also the ones where users considered that local services best met their needs.
The study demonstrated that, in needs assessment, major differences exist between the perceptions of users and their key workers in the various sites. These differences can be explained in part by users' individual characteristics, by types of needs, by local particularities, and by service use.
PubMed ID
16986817 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol and drug consumption in students exposed to the Dawson College shooting: a gender-based analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125439
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;57(4):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Natasha Dugal
Stéphane Guay
Richard Boyer
Alain Lesage
Monique Séguin
Pierre Bleau
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec. natasha.dugal@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;57(4):245-53
Date
Apr-2012
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotropic Drugs - pharmacology
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Students - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Abstract
To study alcohol and drug addiction incidence in students exposed to the Dawson College shooting within the 18 months following the event, to identify the precursors of a psychoactive substance addiction development while considering the severity of event exposure, and to examine whether alcohol use, 18 months after the event, is related to any of the various posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom groups.
The population of this study was comprised of all the Dawson College students at the time of the event. Analyses were conducted with 854 students enrolled in the college at the time of the shooting.
Five per cent of women and 7% of men showed, for the first time in their life, a problem with substance addiction following the shooting. In men, young age, lifetime suicidal ideation, and having seen the killer during the shooting are the main precursors of incident accident cases. None of the studied precursors were significant in women. Men and women were also different in terms of PTSD symptoms predicting alcohol use 18 months after the shooting.
The study highlights the importance of considering a person's sex when studying their psychoactive substance use following a trauma.
PubMed ID
22480590 View in PubMed
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An examination of DSM-IV depressive symptoms and risk for suicide completion in major depressive disorder: a psychological autopsy study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168263
Source
J Affect Disord. 2007 Jan;97(1-3):203-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Alexander McGirr
Johanne Renaud
Monique Seguin
Martin Alda
Chawki Benkelfat
Alain Lesage
Gustavo Turecki
Author Affiliation
McGill Group for Suicide Studies, Douglas Hospital Research Center, McGill University, 6875 LaSalle Blvd., Montreal, QC, Canada H4H 1R3.
Source
J Affect Disord. 2007 Jan;97(1-3):203-9
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appetite
Attention
Body Weight
Comorbidity
Decision Making
Depression - diagnosis - psychology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - psychology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Guilt
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality Assessment
Quebec
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - psychology
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
It is unclear whether certain DSM-IV depressive symptoms are more prevalent among individuals who die in the context of a major depressive episode and those who do not, whether this is associated with proximal or distal suicide risk, and whether depressive symptoms cluster to indicate suicide risk.
A psychological autopsy method with best informants was used to investigate DSM-IV depressive symptoms among 156 suicides who died in the context of a major depressive episode and 81 major depressive controls.
Suicides' depressive symptoms were more likely to include weight or appetite loss, insomnia, feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt as well as recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation. Fatigue and difficulties concentrating or indecisiveness were less prevalent among depressed suicides. These associations were independent of concomitant axis I and II psychopathology. The concomitant presence of (a) fatigue as well as impaired concentration or indecisiveness and (b) weight or appetite gain and hypersomnia was associated with decreased suicide risk. Inter-episode symptom concordance suggests that insomnia is an immediate indicator of suicide risk, while weight or appetite loss and feelings of worthlessness or guilt are not.
This study employed proxy-based interviews.
We found that discrete DSM-IV depressive symptoms and clusters of depressive symptoms help differentiate depressed individuals who die by suicide and those who do not. Moreover, some DSM-IV depressive symptoms are associated with an immediate risk for suicide, while others may result from an etiology of depression common to suicide without directly increasing suicide risk.
PubMed ID
16854469 View in PubMed
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Association between neighborhood-level deprivation and disability in a community sample of people with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149152
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32(11):1998-2004
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Norbert Schmitz
Danit Nitka
Genevieve Gariepy
Ashok Malla
JianLi Wang
Richard Boyer
Lyne Messier
Irene Strychar
Alain Lesage
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. norbert.schmitz@mcgill.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2009 Nov;32(11):1998-2004
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost of Illness
Diabetes Complications - economics - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - economics - epidemiology
Diabetic Angiopathies
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Life Style
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Poverty
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to analyze the association between neighborhood deprivation and self-reported disability in a community sample of people with type 2 diabetes.
Random digit dialing was used to select a sample of adults with self-reported diabetes aged 18-80 years in Quebec, Canada. Health status was assessed by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II. Material and social deprivation was measured using the Pampalon index, which is based on the Canadian Census. Potential risk factors for disability included sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, social support, lifestyle-related factors (smoking, physical activity, and BMI), health care-related problems, duration of diabetes, insulin use, and diabetes-specific complications.
There was a strong association between disability and material and social deprivation in our sample (n = 1,439): participants living in advantaged neighborhoods had lower levels of disability than participants living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. The means +/- SD disability scores for men were 7.8 +/- 11.8, 12.0 +/- 11.8, and 18.1 +/- 19.4 for low, medium, and high deprivation areas, respectively (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19675192 View in PubMed
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[Can mental health problems be diagnosed by general physicians? Perspectives of family physicians according to administrative standards].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150725
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):161-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Youcef Ouadahi
Alain Lesage
Jean Rodrigue
Marie-Josée Fleury
Author Affiliation
MBA, Agent de planification, programmation et recherche, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de la Montérégie.
Source
Sante Ment Que. 2009;34(1):161-72
Date
2009
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Humans
Mental Disorders - diagnosis
Physicians, Family
Quebec
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19475199 View in PubMed
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Care of patients with the most severe and persistent mental illness in an area without a psychiatric hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166154
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Dec;57(12):1765-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Jean-François Trudel
Alain Lesage
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Faculté de Médecine, Universitéde Sherbrooke, IUGS-Argyll, 375 Argyll, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada J1J 3H5. jean-francois.trudel@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Dec;57(12):1765-70
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health) - statistics & numerical data
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Group Homes - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - utilization
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - utilization
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Rural health services - organization & administration
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
With standard community resources, managing some patients with long-term mental illness can prove difficult, given the high level of care required. How many beds do such patients require? The study examined the prevalence, diagnostic and behavioral characteristics, and residential arrangements of a cohort of these patients in a semirural area of Canada (population of 291,500). The area has always functioned without a psychiatric hospital.
A cross-sectional inquiry was made of all relevant institutions and residential facilities (including the local jail and shelters). Key stakeholders were interviewed and provincial databases were accessed in an effort to identify all adults aged 18 to 65 originating from the catchment area who displayed both a psychotic illness and severe behavioral disturbance necessitating ongoing close supervision. The Riverview Psychiatric Inventory was used to describe and quantify behavioral problems.
Thirty-six patients met the study criteria, for a prevalence of 12.4 per 100,000 in the general population. Most resided in a publicly funded nursing home or a well-staffed rural group home. Four (prevalence of 1.4 per 100,000) had a forensic profile, needed secure settings, and were long-term residents on acute care wards. Only one patient had transferred to a psychiatric hospital outside the catchment area.
Care for this population can be provided outside conventional psychiatric institutions but requires highly supervised long-term residential services in the range of ten to 40 per 100,000 in the population, depending on area characteristics, with urban, socially deprived areas likely having higher needs.
PubMed ID
17158492 View in PubMed
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Community pharmacy loyalty among individuals with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115283
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2013 Nov-Dec;9(6):806-16
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sophie Lauzier
Jean-Pierre Grégoire
Alain Lesage
Jocelyne Moisan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Pharmacy, 1050 avenue de la Médecine, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6; Chair on adherence to treatments, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6; Santé des populations: URESP, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, 1050 Chemin Ste-Foy, Québec, QC, Canada G1S 4L8. Electronic address: sophie.lauzier@pha.ulaval.ca.
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2013 Nov-Dec;9(6):806-16
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Community Pharmacy Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quebec
Schizophrenia - drug therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Community pharmacists can use medication records to assist individuals who are loyal to their pharmacy in better managing their pharmacotherapy. However, the extent of community pharmacy loyalty among individuals with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia remains unknown.
To assess the extent of community pharmacy loyalty among individuals with schizophrenia and identify factors associated with loyalty.
Using the Quebec Health Insurance Board databases, a cohort study of individuals with schizophrenia who claimed an antipsychotic drug for the first time between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2005 was conducted. Such individuals were considered loyal to their community pharmacy if they filled all their prescriptions for any drug at the same community pharmacy during the second year after antipsychotics initiation. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with community pharmacy loyalty (measured in the first year after antipsychotics initiation).
Of the 6159 individuals in the study, 57.8% were loyal to one pharmacy. Men were more likely to be loyal (Adjusted OR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.16-1.44), as were individuals aged 30-64 years and those aged =65 years, when compared to individuals 20-29 years (1.70; 1.48-1.95 and 2.39; 1.97-2.90, respectively). Individuals who filled their antipsychotics on a weekly basis were also more likely to be loyal (1.39; 1.18-1.63). Factors associated with non-loyalty were welfare beneficiary status (0.79; 0.70-0.89), having substance-use disorder (0.69; 0.60-0.80), a greater number of different types of drugs (5-8 types = 0.76; 0.66-0.87; 9-51 = 0.59; 0.50-0.69), and emergency department visits (0.71; 0.60-0.82).
Results suggest that medication records in community pharmacies are incomplete for 42.2% of individuals with schizophrenia. Individuals more likely to experience more severe illness were also those less likely to be loyal. Given the potentially severe consequences of medication-related problems in this latter population, strategies to further improve the comprehensiveness of medication information should be promoted.
PubMed ID
23522802 View in PubMed
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Comparing mental health of francophone populations in Canada, france, and belgium: 12-month prevalence rates of common mental disorders (part 1).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143469
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 May;55(5):289-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Raymond Tempier
Helen-Maria Vasiliadis
Fabien Gilbert
Koen Demyttenaere
Ronny Bruffaerts
Anke Bonnewyn
Jean-Pierre Lépine
Isabelle Gasquet
Karen Mosier
Alain Lesage
Chassidy Puchala
Marje Lepnurm
Viviane Kovess-Masféty
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. raymond.tempier@usask.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 May;55(5):289-94
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Belgium
Canada
Comorbidity
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
France
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
To compare the 12-month prevalence of common mental disorders among francophones in Canada, France, and Belgium. This is the first article in a 2-part series comparing mental disorders and service use prevalence of French-speaking populations.
This is a secondary analysis of data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Mental Health and Well-Being (CCHS 1.2) in 2002 and the European Study of Epidemiology of Mental Disorders-Mental Health Disability (ESEMeD) from 2001 to 2003, where comparable questionnaires were administered to representative samples of adults in Canada, France, and Belgium. In Canada, francophone respondents living in Quebec (n = 7571) and outside Quebec (n = 500) completed the French version of the CCHS 1.2 questionnaire. Francophone respondents in Belgium (n = 389) and in France (n = 1436) completed the French version of the ESEMeD population survey questionnaire. Major depressive episodes (MDEs), specific anxiety disorders (ADs), and alcohol abuse and (or) dependence disorders' rates were assessed.
The overall prevalence rate for the presence of any MDE, AD, or alcohol abuse and (or) dependence was similar in all francophone populations studied in Canada and Europe and averaged 8.5%.
Mental disorders were equally distributed in all francophone populations studied. Cross-national comparisons continue to be instrumental in providing information useful for the creation of appropriate policies and programs for specific subsets of populations.
PubMed ID
20482955 View in PubMed
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Comparing mental health of francophones in Canada, france, and belgium: 12-month and lifetime rates of mental health service use (part 2).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143468
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 May;55(5):295-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Raymond Tempier
Helen-Maria Vasiliadis
Fabien Gilbert
Koen Demyttenaere
Ronny Bruffaerts
Jean-Pierre Lépine
Isabelle Gasquet
Marje Lepnurm
Alain Lesage
Chassidy Puchala
Karen Mosier
Viviane Kovess-Masféty
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. raymond.tempier@usask.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 May;55(5):295-304
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Belgium
Canada
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
France
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Language
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To compare 12-month and lifetime service use for common mental disorders in 4 francophone subsamples using data from national mental health surveys in Canada, Quebec, France, and Belgium. This is the second article in a 2-part series comparing mental disorders and service use prevalence of French-speaking populations.
Comparable World Mental Health-Composite International Diagnostic Interviews (WMH-CIDI) were administered to representative samples of adults (aged 18 years and older) in Canada during 2002 and in France and Belgium from 2001 to 2003. Two groups of francophone adults in Canada, in Quebec (n = 7571) and outside Quebec (n = 500), and respondents in Belgium (n = 389) and France (n = 1436) completed the French version of the population survey. Prevalence rates of common mental health service use were examined for major depressive episodes and specific anxiety disorders (that is, agoraphobia, social phobia, and panic disorder).
Overall, most francophones with mental disorders do not seek treatment. Canadians consulted more mental health professionals than their European counterparts, with the exception of psychiatrists.
Patterns of service use are similar among francophone populations. Variations that exist may be accounted for by differences in health care resources, health care systems, and health insurance coverage.
PubMed ID
20482956 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.