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A 12-year Trend of Psychological Distress: National Study of Finnish University Students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285639
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Airi Oksanen
Katri Laimi
Katja Björklund
Eliisa Löyttyniemi
Kristina Kunttu
Source
Cent Eur J Public Health. 2017 Jun;25(2):113-119
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
The study aimed to explore changes in the prevalence of psychological distress and co-occurring psychological symptoms among 19-34 years old Finnish university students between the years 2000 and 2012.
The prevalence of perceived frequent psychological symptoms was compared in four nationwide cross-sectional student health surveys with random samples (N=11,502) in the following years: 2000 (N=3,174), 2004 (N=3,153), 2008 (N=2,750), and 2012 (N=2,425).
In the time phase from 2000 to 2012, the overall psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire, GHQ-12) increased from 22% to 28%, while there was also an increase in the frequently experienced psychological symptoms (depressiveness from 13% to 15%, anxiety from 8% to 13%, concentration problems from 12% to 18%, and psychological tension from 13% to 18% with a peak prevalence observed in 2008). The co-occurrence of different psychological symptoms increased as well. Psychological distress was more common in females and in older students.
The findings suggest an increasing trend of frequent psychological distress among Finnish university students over the years from 2000 to 2012, with the peak prevalence occurring in 2008, which may reflect the growing multifaceted environmental demands.
PubMed ID
28662321 View in PubMed
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Strength and mobility of the neck-shoulder region in adolescent headache.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167850
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2006 Sep;22(4):163-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Airi Oksanen
Liisa Metsähonkala
Suvi Viander
Eija Jäppilä
Minna Aromaa
Pirjo Anttila
Jouko Salminen
Matti Sillanpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. airi.oksanen@tyks.fi
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2006 Sep;22(4):163-74
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Cervical Vertebrae - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Migraine Disorders - physiopathology
Muscle strength
Range of Motion, Articular
Sex Factors
Shoulder Joint - physiopathology
Tension-Type Headache - physiopathology
Upper Extremity - physiopathology
Abstract
The significance of the musculoskeletal function of the neck-shoulder region in different headache types in children and adolescents is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between different types of headache and the strength and mobility of the neck-shoulder region in 13-year-old schoolchildren. A structured questionnaire on headache was sent to all 1,409 children in the sixth grade in the city of Turku. Of the 1,135 (81%) children who completed the questionnaire, a sample from different headache groups was randomly selected for clinical examination. The study consisted of 59 children with migraine, 65 with episodic tension-type headache (TTHA), and 59 headache-free controls. Dynamic muscle strength of the upper extremities (UE endurance), mobility of both shoulders (UE mobility), and the cervical range of motion (CROM) were measured. Girls with episodic TTHA had lower UE endurance of both dominant and nondominant sides than girls in the other study groups. Girls with migraine had lower UE endurance of nondominant side than girls in the control group. In boys, no significant differences were observed. An interesting association between the function of the neck-shoulder region and headache complaints in adolescents was ascertained.
PubMed ID
16920676 View in PubMed
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