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"ASUKI Step" pedometer intervention in university staff: rationale and design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121591
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:657
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Barbara E Ainsworth
Cheryl Der Ananian
Ali Soroush
Jenelle Walker
Pamela Swan
Eric Poortvliet
Agneta Yngve
Author Affiliation
Exercise and Wellness Program, School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, Arizona State University, 500 N, 3rd Street, Phoenix, AZ 85003, USA. Barbara.ainsworth@asu.edu
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:657
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Adult
Arizona
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation - methods
Occupational Health
Physical Fitness
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sleep
Sweden
Universities
Abstract
We describe the study design and methods used in a 9-month pedometer-based worksite intervention called "ASUKI Step" conducted at the Karolinska Institutet (KI) in Stockholm, Sweden and Arizona State University (ASU) in the greater Phoenix area, Arizona.
"ASUKI Step" was based on the theory of social support and a quasi-experimental design was used for evaluation. Participants included 2,118 faculty, staff, and graduate students from ASU (n?=?712) and KI (n?=?1,406) who participated in teams of 3-4 persons. The intervention required participants to accumulate 10,000 steps each day for six months, with a 3-month follow-up period. Steps were recorded onto a study-specific website. Participants completed a website-delivered questionnaire four times to identify socio-demographic, health, psychosocial and environmental correlates of study participation. One person from each team at each university location was randomly selected to complete physical fitness testing to determine their anthropometric and cardiovascular health and to wear an accelerometer for one week. Study aims were: 1) to have a minimum of 400 employee participants from each university site reach a level of 10,000 steps per day on at least 100?days (3.5?months) during the trial period; 2) to have 70% of the employee participants from each university site maintain two or fewer inactive days per week, defined as a level of less than 3,000 steps per day; 3) to describe the socio-demographic, psychosocial, environmental and health-related determinants of success in the intervention; and 4) to evaluate the effects of a pedometer-based walking intervention in a university setting on changes in self-perceived health and stress level, sleep patterns, anthropometric measures and fitness.Incentives were given for compliance to the study protocol that included weekly raffles for participation prizes and a grand finale trip to Arizona or Sweden for teams with most days over 10,000 steps.
"ASUKI Step" is designed to increase the number of days employees walk 10,000 steps and to reduce the number of days employees spend being inactive. The study also evaluates the intra- and interpersonal determinants for success in the intervention and in a sub-sample of the study, changes in physical fitness and body composition during the study.
Current Controlled Trials NCT01537939.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22894138 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake of lignans and risk of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125008
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jun;23(6):837-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Yulan Lin
Agneta Yngve
Jesper Lagergren
Yunxia Lu
Author Affiliation
Unit of Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Norra Stationsgatan 67, Stockholm, Sweden. yulan.lin@ki.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Jun;23(6):837-44
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Esophagogastric Junction - metabolism - pathology
Female
Humans
Lignans - administration & dosage
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Phytoestrogens - administration & dosage
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The strong male predominance in esophageal and gastroesophageal junctional adenocarcinoma remains unexplained. Sex hormonal influence has been suggested, but not proven. A protective role of dietary phytoestrogen lignans was hypothesized.
A Swedish nationwide population-based case-control study was conducted in 1995-1997, including 181 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 255 cases of gastroesophageal junctional adenocarcinoma, 158 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and 806 control subjects. Data on various exposures, including dietary data, were collected through personal interviews and questionnaires. Dietary intake of lignans was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and categorized into quartiles based on the consumption among the control participants. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95?% confidence intervals (CIs), including adjustment for all established risk factors.
Participants in the highest quartile of intake of lignans compared with the lowest quartile were at a decreased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.65; 95?% CI, 0.38-1.12; p for trend =0.03), gastroesophageal junctional adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.37; 95?% CI, 0.23-0.58; p for trend
PubMed ID
22527161 View in PubMed
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Do descriptive norms related to parents and friends predict fruit and vegetable intake similarly among 11-year-old girls and boys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271271
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Ari Haukkala
Agneta Yngve
Inga Thorsdottir
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Jan 14;115(1):168-75
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Child
Diet - standards
Eating
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Friends
Fruit
Humans
Male
Parents
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
We examined whether there are sex differences in children's fruit and vegetable (FV) intake and in descriptive norms (i.e. perceived FV intake) related to parents and friends. We also studied whether friends' impact is as important as that of parents on children's FV intake. Data from the PRO GREENS project in Finland were obtained from 424 children at the age 11 years at baseline. At baseline, 2009 children filled in a questionnaire about descriptive norms conceptualised as perceived FV intake of their parents and friends. They also filled in a validated FFQ that assessed their FV intake both at baseline and in the follow-up in 2010. The associations were examined with multi-level regression analyses with multi-group comparisons. Girls reported higher perceived FV intake of friends and higher own fruit intake at baseline, compared with boys, and higher vegetable intake both at baseline and in the follow-up. Perceived FV intake of parents and friends was positively associated with both girls' and boys' FV intake in both study years. The impact of perceived fruit intake of the mother was stronger among boys. The change in children's FV intake was affected only by perceived FV intake of father and friends. No large sex differences in descriptive norms were found, but the impact of friends on children's FV intake can generally be considered as important as that of parents. Future interventions could benefit from taking into account friends' impact as role models on children's FV intake.
PubMed ID
26450715 View in PubMed
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The European Youth Heart Survey (EYHS): an international study that addresses the multi-dimensional issues of CVD risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29791
Source
Forum Nutr. 2003;56:254-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

Fruit and vegetable intake in a sample of 11-year-old children in 9 European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29551
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Agneta Yngve
Alexandra Wolf
Eric Poortvliet
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Johannes Brug
Bettina Ehrenblad
Bela Franchini
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Rikke Krølner
Lea Maes
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Michael Sjostrom
Inga Thórsdóttir
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. agneta.yngve@prevnut.ki.se
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):236-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Nutrition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Sex Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: An adequate fruit and vegetable intake provides essential nutrients and nutritive compounds and is considered an important part of a healthy lifestyle. No simple instrument has been available for the assessment of fruit and vegetable intake as well as its determinants in school-aged children applicable in different European countries. Within the Pro Children Project, such an instrument has been developed. This paper describes the cross-sectional survey in 11-year-olds in 9 countries. METHODS: The cross-sectional survey used nationally, and in 2 countries regionally, representative samples of schools and classes. The questionnaires, including a precoded 24-hour recall component and a food frequency part, were completed in the classroom. Data were treated using common syntax files for portion sizes and for merging of vegetable types into four subgroups. RESULTS: The results show that the fruit and vegetable intake in amounts and choice were highly diverse in the 9 participating countries. Vegetable intake was in general lower than fruit intake, boys consumed less fruit and vegetables than girls did. The highest total intake according to the 24-hour recall was found in Austria and Portugal, the lowest in Spain and Iceland. CONCLUSION: The fruit and vegetable intake in 11-year-old children was in all countries far from reaching population goals and food-based dietary guidelines on national and international levels.
PubMed ID
16088087 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake of mothers of 11-year-old children in nine European countries: The Pro Children Cross-sectional Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29550
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Alexandra Wolf
Agneta Yngve
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Eric Poortvliet
Bettina Ehrenblad
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Inga Thórsdóttir
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Johannes Brug
Lea Maes
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Rikke Krølner
Knut-Inge Klepp
Author Affiliation
Institute for Nutritional Sciences, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):246-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Recall
Mothers
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare fruit and vegetable intakes of mothers of 11-year-old children across Europe. METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys were carried out in 9 European countries in October/November 2003. Self-administered questionnaires assessing fruit and vegetable consumption were used for data collection. The current paper presents dietary intake data obtained by a precoded 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS: The consumption levels of fruit and vegetables (without fruit juice) were in line with World Health Organization recommendations of > or =400 g/day for only 27% of all participating mothers. Based on both instruments, the Pro Children results showed comparatively high average fruit intake levels in Portugal, Denmark and Sweden (211, 203 and 194 g/day) and the lowest intake in Iceland (97 g/day). High vegetable intake levels were found in Portugal and Belgium (169 and 150 g/day), the lowest in Spain (88 g/day). A south-north gradient could not be observed in the Pro Children study. CONCLUSION: Fruit and vegetable intakes are low in mothers of 11-year-olds across Europe. Especially vegetable consumption can be regarded as marginal in most of the studied European countries. A high percentage of mothers indicated to eat fruit and vegetables less than once a day. The results have shown that national and international interventions are necessary to promote fruit and especially vegetable consumption in the European population of mothers.
PubMed ID
16088088 View in PubMed
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High folate intake is related to better academic achievement in Swedish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133041
Source
Pediatrics. 2011 Aug;128(2):e358-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Torbjörn K Nilsson
Agneta Yngve
Anna K Böttiger
Anita Hurtig-Wennlöf
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Sweden. torbjorn.nilsson@orebroll.se
Source
Pediatrics. 2011 Aug;128(2):e358-65
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Cohort Studies
Diet - methods
Educational Measurement - methods
Educational Status
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Adolescents are vulnerable to increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and to insufficient folate status. Folate status and Hcy metabolism are linked to cognitive functions, but academic achievement by adolescents has not been studied in this respect.
To assess a possible link between academic achievement in adolescents and tHcy and its determinants, dietary folate intake, MTHFR 677 TT homozygosity, and socioeconomic status (SES).
A study of 386 Swedish adolescents aged 15 years in whom plasma tHcy and MTHFR 677C ?T genotype were assayed. The sum of school grades in 10 core subjects obtained in the final semester of compulsory 9 years of schooling was used as outcome measure of academic achievement. Lifestyle and SES data were obtained from questionnaires.
Academic achievement was strongly correlated to tertiles of tHcy (negatively; P = .023) and to tertiles of folate intake (positively; P
PubMed ID
21746721 View in PubMed
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The PRO GREENS intervention in Finnish schoolchildren - the degree of implementation affects both mediators and the intake of fruits and vegetables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258776
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-14-2014
Author
Reetta Lehto
Suvi Määttä
Elviira Lehto
Carola Ray
Saskia Te Velde
Nanna Lien
Inga Thorsdottir
Agneta Yngve
Eva Roos
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Oct 14;112(7):1185-94
Date
Oct-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Diet
Europe
Faculty
Female
Finland
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Plan Implementation
Health promotion
Humans
Male
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Snacks
Students
Vegetables
Abstract
Little is known about the mediating effects of the determinants of fruit and vegetable (FV) intake in school-based interventions that promote FV intake, and few studies have examined the impact of the degree of implementation on the effects of an intervention. The present study examined whether the degree of implementation of an intervention had an effect on children's fruit or vegetable intake and determined possible mediators of this effect. The study is part of the European PRO GREENS intervention study which aimed to develop effective strategies to promote consumption of fruit and vegetables in schoolchildren across Europe. Data from 727 Finnish children aged 11 years were used. The baseline study was conducted in spring 2009 and the follow-up study 12 months later. The intervention was conducted during the school year 2009-2010. The effects were examined using multilevel mediation analyses. A high degree of implementation of the intervention had an effect on children's fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and liking mediated the association between a high degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Knowledge of recommendations for FV intake and bringing fruits to school as a snack mediated the association between a low degree of implementation of the intervention and an increase in the frequency of fruit intake. Overall, the model accounted for 34 % of the variance in the change in fruit intake frequency. Knowledge of recommendations acted as a mediator between the degree of implementation of the intervention and the change in vegetable intake frequency. In conclusion, the degree of implementation had an effect on fruit intake, and thus in future intervention studies the actual degree of implementation of interventions should be assessed when considering the effects of interventions.
PubMed ID
25106046 View in PubMed
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Promoting fruit and vegetable consumption among European schoolchildren: rationale, conceptualization and design of the pro children project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29553
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):212-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Knut-Inge Klepp
Carmen Pérez-Rodrigo
Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij
P Pernille Due
Ibrahim Elmadfa
Jóhanna Haraldsdóttir
Jurgen Konig
Michael Sjostrom
Inga Thórsdóttir
Maria Daniel Vaz de Almeida
Agneta Yngve
Johannes Brug
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. k.i.klepp@medisin.uop.no
Source
Ann Nutr Metab. 2005 Jul-Aug;49(4):212-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Nutrition - education
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Nutrition Assessment
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schools
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIMS: The Pro Children Project was designed to assess fruit and vegetable consumption in European schoolchildren and their parents, as well as determinants of the children's consumption patterns. A second objective was to develop and test strategies, applicable across Europe, for promoting consumption of fruits and vegetables among schoolchildren and their parents. In this paper, the rationale, theoretical background, overall design and implementation of the project is presented. METHODS: Surveys of national, representative samples of 11-year-old schoolchildren and their parents were conducted in 9 countries, i.e. in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain and Sweden. Comprehensive school-based educational programmes have been developed and tested in three settings, i.e. in Spain, the Netherlands and in Norway. A precoded 24-hour recall form combined with a set of food frequency questions assessing regular intake were used to assess fruit and vegetable consumption. Determinants were assessed employing a comprehensive theoretical framework including personal, social and environmental factors related to fruit and vegetable consumption. The intervention programmes have been tested employing a group-randomized trial design where schools have been randomly allocated to an intervention arm and a delayed intervention arm. Surveys among all participating children and their parents were conducted prior to the initiation of the intervention, immediately after the end of the intervention and at the end of the subsequent school year. CONCLUSION: The project is expected to provide new information of great importance for improving our understanding of consumption patterns of fruits and vegetables and for guiding future efforts to promote increased consumption patterns across Europe.
PubMed ID
16088084 View in PubMed
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Sampling procedure, participation rates and representativeness in the Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study (EYHS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30958
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 May;6(3):291-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2003
Author
Anita Hurtig Wennlöf
Agneta Yngve
Michael Sjöström
Author Affiliation
Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Biosciences at NOVUM, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. anita.hurtig-wennlof@ivo.oru.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 May;6(3):291-9
Date
May-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Europe
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Sample Size
Sampling Studies
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The European Youth Heart Study (EYHS) is a cross-sectional, school-based population study on risk factors for future cardiovascular disease in children, with an overall participation rate in Sweden of about 50%. To study the representativeness of the participants in the Swedish part of EYHS, a comprehensive non-participant follow-up study was carried out. DESIGN: A structured multilevel analysis model was developed, addressing each level in the sampling procedure. The income, educational and occupational categories of the geographical regions of the study (level I), school catchment areas (level II) and parents (level III) were compared with official data. Participating and non-participating pupils (level IV) were compared through a questionnaire. SETTING: Thirty-seven state schools in two regions of Central Sweden (Orebro and southern Stockholm) were visited during the school year 1998/1999. SUBJECTS: Boys and girls aged 9 and 15 years were randomly sampled through a multiphase sampling procedure. RESULTS: Data for socio-economic status for levels I and II corresponded well to national and regional official data. At level III, non-manually working parents were slightly over-represented among parents of participating children. At level IV, non-participating subjects corresponded in most respects to participants with a few exceptions--mainly more interest in physical exercise among participants. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the knowledge from the non-participant study, we do not foresee problems regarding interpretation of the outcomes in the EYHS, despite the low participation rate.
PubMed ID
12740078 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.