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Determination of patient preference for location of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114793
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2013 May;47(4):288-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
John H Landau
Teresa V Novick
Luc Dubois
Adam H Power
Jeremy R Harris
Guy Derose
Thomas L Forbes
Author Affiliation
Division of Vascular Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre & Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Vasc Endovascular Surg. 2013 May;47(4):288-93
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Hospitals, High-Volume
Hospitals, Low-Volume
Humans
Male
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Preference
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - mortality
Abstract
Aneurysm repair is centralized in higher volume centers resulting in reduced mortality, with longer travel distances. The purpose of this study is to explore patients' preference between local care versus longer distances and lower mortality rates.
Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) measuring 4 to 5 cm and living at least a 1-hour drive from our hospital were asked to assume it had grown to 5.5 cm, and repair was recommended with a mortality risk of 2%. The level of additional risk they would accept to undergo surgery locally was determined.
A total of 67 patients were surveyed. If mortality risk was equivalent at the local and regional hospitals, 44% preferred care at our tertiary center, while 56% preferred surgery locally. If perioperative mortality was increased at the local hospital, 9% preferred local surgery.
The vast majority of patients with AAA will accept longer travel distances for care as long as it results in a reduction in perioperative mortality.
PubMed ID
23579366 View in PubMed
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Identification of patient-derived outcomes after aortic aneurysm repair.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105202
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2014 Jun;59(6):1528-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Luc Dubois
Teresa V Novick
Adam H Power
Guy DeRose
Thomas L Forbes
Author Affiliation
Division of Vascular Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre and Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: luc.dubois@lhsc.on.ca.
Source
J Vasc Surg. 2014 Jun;59(6):1528-34
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - surgery
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - methods
Decision Making
Endovascular Procedures - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Selection
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Relatively few outcomes have been examined in randomized comparisons of endovascular and open aortic aneurysm repair, and no patient input was obtained in the selection of these outcomes. The aim of this study was to identify patient-derived, potentially novel outcomes that may be used to guide future clinical trials in aneurysm surgery.
Focus group interviews were conducted with patients who had undergone endovascular or open aortic aneurysm repair. The discussions were transcribed and the transcript was analyzed by two indexers using constant-comparison analysis and grounded theory to identify potentially novel, patient-derived outcomes. Other potential themes relating to the patients' experience and their decision-making were also sought.
Six focus groups were conducted (three with endovascular aneurysm repair patients and three with open aortic aneurysm repair patients), with a median of six participants, 2 to 12 months from surgery. Functional outcomes were most commonly mentioned and emphasized by patients. Recovery time and energy level were most frequently verbalized as important in the decision-making process between endovascular and open aneurysm repair. Other potential outcomes identified as important to patients included postoperative pain, time to walking normally, loss of appetite, extent and location of incisions, impact on cognition, being able to go home after surgery, and impact on caregivers. In addition to these outcomes, we identified three themes relating to the patient's experience: undervaluing or underappreciating the risk of death during surgery, differing informational needs and level of involvement in decision-making, and unrealistic patient expectations about the risks of and recovery after the procedure.
Functional outcomes emerged as most important during qualitative analysis of patients' experiences with aneurysm repair. Perceived differences in recovery time were identified as an important consideration for aneurysm patients in deciding between open and endovascular repair. More work needs to be done clarifying the concept of recovery and other related functional outcomes for the development of methods to assess and to evaluate these in prospective clinical trials.
PubMed ID
24447539 View in PubMed
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