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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Ada Parsons: "Giving birth should be a special time": Narrative 9 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 22, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256849
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014

Care of the Injured Patients at Nursing Stations and during Air Medical Transport.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291708
Source
Air Med J. 2018 May - Jun; 37(3):161-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Brodie Nolan
Alun Ackery
Sol Mamakwa
Shari Glenn
David VanderBurgh
Aaron Orkin
Michael Kirlew
Evelyn Dell
Homer Tien
Author Affiliation
Ornge Air Ambulance, 5310 Explorer Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5W 5H8, Canada.
Source
Air Med J. 2018 May - Jun; 37(3):161-164
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Nursing stations are the only access point into the health care system for some communities and have limited capabilities and resources. We describe characteristics of patients injured in Northern Ontario who present to nursing stations and require transport by air ambulance. Secondary objectives are to compare interventions performed at nursing stations with those performed by flight paramedics and to identify systemic gaps in trauma care.
A retrospective cohort study was performed of all injured patients transported by air ambulance from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015.
A total of 125 injured patients were transported from nursing stations. Blunt trauma accounted for 82.5% of injuries, and alcohol intoxication was suspected in 41.6% of patients. The most frequently performed interventions were intravenous fluids and analgesia. Paramedics administered oxygen 62.4% of the time, whereas nursing stations only applied in 8.8% of cases. Flight paramedics were the only providers to intubate and administer tranexamic acid, mannitol, or vasopressors.
Care for patients at nursing stations may be improved by updating the drug formulary based on gap analyses. Further research should examine the role of telemedicine support for nursing station staff and the use of point-of-care devices to screen for traumatic intracranial hemorrhage.
PubMed ID
29735227 View in PubMed
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Cheryl McWatch: "If you do it right, you'll feel it in your heart": Narrative 5 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 21, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256854
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e65-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Cheryl McWatch
Aaron Orkin
Sarah Newbery
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e65-8
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American
Maternal health services
Ontario
Parturition
Pregnancy - psychology
Pregnancy, Twin - psychology
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):58-6424452565
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e69-7224452583
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e73-624452585
PubMed ID
24452582 View in PubMed
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Community-based participatory research with indigenous communities: the proximity paradox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256556
Source
Health Place. 2013 Nov;24:183-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Stephen D Ritchie
Mary Jo Wabano
Jackson Beardy
Jeffrey Curran
Aaron Orkin
David VanderBurgh
Nancy L Young
Author Affiliation
School of Rural and Northern Health, Laurentian University Ramsey Lake Road Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6; ECHO (Evaluating Children's Health Outcomes) Research Centre and Laurentian University Ramsey Lake Road Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6. Electronic address: sritchie@laurentian.ca.
Source
Health Place. 2013 Nov;24:183-9
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Ontario
Population Groups
Rural Population
Abstract
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is a promising approach used with increasing prevalence in health research with underserviced Indigenous communities in rural and remote locations. This case comparison used CBPR principles to examine the characteristics of two collaborative research projects in Canada. Both projects reflected CBPR principles in unique ways with particular differences related to community access and proximity of collaborating partners. CBPR principles are often used and recommended for partnerships involving remote underserviced communities, however many of these principles were easier to follow for the collaboration with a relatively well serviced community in close proximity to researchers, and more challenging to follow for a remote underserviced community. The proximity paradox is an apparent contradiction in the increasing application of CBPR principles for use in distal partnerships with remote Indigenous communities when many of these same principles are nearly impossible to follow. CBPR principles are much easier to apply in proximal partnerships because they afford an environment where collaborative relationships can be developed and sustained.
PubMed ID
24140703 View in PubMed
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Connie McWatch: "I have a lot of blessings": Narrative 6 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 12, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256853
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Connie McWatch
Aaron Orkin
Sarah Newbery
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e69-72
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Caregivers
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Home Childbirth
Humans
Indians, North American
Maternal health services
Midwifery
Ontario
Pregnancy
Rural Population
Smoking
Social Support
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):58-6424452565
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e65-824452582
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e73-624452585
PubMed ID
24452583 View in PubMed
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Development and implementation of an opioid overdose prevention and response program in Toronto, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112514
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e200-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Pamela N Leece
Shaun Hopkins
Chantel Marshall
Aaron Orkin
Margaret A Gassanov
Rita M Shahin
Author Affiliation
Public Health and Preventive Medicine Residency Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 May-Jun;104(3):e200-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesics, Opioid - poisoning
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Drug Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Health education
Humans
Naloxone - therapeutic use
Narcotic Antagonists - therapeutic use
Needle-Exchange Programs
Ontario - epidemiology
Opioid-Related Disorders - drug therapy - mortality
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Public Health Practice
Resuscitation - methods
Abstract
We describe the development of the first community-based opioid overdose prevention and response program with naloxone distribution offered by a public health unit in Canada (Prevent Overdose in Toronto, POINT).
The target population is people who use opioids by any route, throughout the City of Toronto.
The POINT program is operated by the needle exchange program at Toronto Public Health (The Works) and offered at over 40 partner agency sites throughout Toronto.
POINT is a comprehensive program of overdose prevention and response training, including naloxone dispensing. Clients are instructed by public health staff on overdose risk factors, recognizing signs and symptoms of overdose, calling 911, naloxone administration, stimulation and chest compressions, and post-overdose care. Training is offered to clients one-on-one or in small groups. Clients receive a naloxone kit including two 1 mL ampoules of naloxone hydrochloride (0.4 mg/mL) and are advised to return to The Works for a refill and debriefing if the naloxone kit is used.
In the first 8 months of the program, 209 clients were trained. Clients have reported 17 administrations of naloxone, and all overdose victims have reportedly survived. Client demand for POINT training has been high, and Toronto Public Health has expanded its capacity to provide training. Overall, reception to the program has been overwhelmingly positive.
We are encouraged by the initial development and implementation experience with the naloxone program and its potential to save lives in Toronto. We have planned short-, intermediate-, and long-term process and outcome evaluations.
PubMed ID
23823882 View in PubMed
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Epidemiologic features of medical emergencies in remote First Nations in northern Ontario: a cross-sectional descriptive study using air ambulance transport data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305896
Source
CMAJ Open. 2020 Apr-Jun; 8(2):E400-E406
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
David VanderBurgh
David W Savage
Sacha Dubois
Natalie Binguis
Sadie Maxwell
Natalie Bocking
Terri Farrell
Homer Tien
Stephen D Ritchie
Aaron Orkin
Author Affiliation
Section of Emergency Medicine (VanderBurgh, Savage), Division of Clinical Sciences and Human Sciences Division (Dubois), Northern Ontario School of Medicine; Centre for Applied Health Research (Dubois), St. Joseph's Care Group; School of Nursing (Dubois), Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, Lakehead University; Nishnawbe Aski Nation (Binguis), Thunder Bay, Ont.; Windigo First Nations Council (Maxwell); Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority (Bocking, Farrell), Sioux Lookout, Ont.; Division of General Surgery (Tien), Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; School of Human Kinetics (Ritchie), Faculty of Health and Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research (Ritchie), Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ont.; Department of Family and Community Medicine (Orkin), University of Toronto; Department of Emergency Medicine (Orkin), St. Joseph's Health Centre and Humber River Hospital, Toronto, Ont.
Source
CMAJ Open. 2020 Apr-Jun; 8(2):E400-E406
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Ambulances - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergencies - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geography, Medical
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Transportation of Patients - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
For about 25 000 Ontarians living in remote northern First Nations communities, seeing a doctor in an emergency department requires flying in an airplane or helicopter. This study describes the demographic and epidemiologic characteristics of patients transported from these communities to access hospital-based emergency medical care.
In this cross-sectional descriptive study, we examined primary medical data on patient transportation from Ornge, the provincial medical air ambulance service provider, for 26 remote Nishnawbe Aski Nation communities in northern Ontario from 2012 to 2016. We described these transports using univariate descriptive statistics.
Over the 5-year study period, 10 538 patients (mean 2107.6 per year) were transported by Ornge from the 26 communities. Transport incidence ranged from 9.2 to 9.5 per 100 on-reserve population per year. Women aged 65 years or more had the highest transport incidence (25.9 per 100). Girls aged 5-9 years had the lowest mean incidence (2.1 per 100). Gastrointestinal issues accounted for 13.3% of transfers. Neurologic issues, respiratory issues and trauma each accounted for about 11% of transfers, and cardiac issues for 9.6%. Patients with obstetric issues accounted for 7.6% of transfers per year, and toxicologic emergencies for 7.5%.
This study provides the epidemiologic foundation to improve emergency care and emergency transport from remote First Nation communities in Ontario.
PubMed ID
32447282 View in PubMed
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Jennifer Coleman: "I deliver babies with the docs": Narrative 2 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 11, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256857
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Jennifer Coleman
Aaron Orkin
Sarah Newbery
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e53-6
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Maternal health services
Nurses
Ontario
Parturition
Pregnancy
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):58-6424452565
PubMed ID
24452579 View in PubMed
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Jillian McPeake: "Look at that face!": Narrative 4 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 21, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256855
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014

Marathon maternity oral history project: Exploring rural birthing through narrative methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256862
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):58-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Aaron Orkin
Sarah Newbery
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 955 Oliver Rd, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1. aorkin@nosm.ca.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):58-64
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Maternal health services
Narration
Obstetrics
Ontario
Parturition
Pregnancy
Qualitative Research
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Abstract
To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community.
Oral history research.
The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500.
A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area.
Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making.
Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project's findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women's voices. The project's narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature.
Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon's stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing maternity services in rural Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24452565 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.