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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Acute myeloid leukemia following Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based study of 35,511 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16487
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Sara J Schonfeld
Ethel S Gilbert
Graça M Dores
Charles F Lynch
David C Hodgson
Per Hall
Hans Storm
Aage Andersen
Eero Pukkala
Eric Holowaty
Magnus Kaijser
Michael Andersson
Heikki Joensuu
Sophie D Fosså
James M Allan
Lois B Travis
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892-7238, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hodgkin Disease - drug therapy - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - chemically induced - epidemiology
North America - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Design
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Risk assessment
SEER Program
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma are associated with large relative risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but there are few estimates of the excess absolute risk (EAR), a useful measure of disease burden. One-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (N = 35,511) were identified within 14 population-based cancer registries in Nordic countries and North America from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2001. We used Poisson regression analysis to model the EAR of AML, per 10,000 person-years. A total of 217 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors were diagnosed with AML (10.8 expected; unadjusted EAR = 6.2; 95% confidence interval = 5.4 to 7.1). Excess absolute risk for AML was highest during the first 10 years after Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis but remained elevated thereafter. In subsequent analyses, adjusted for time since Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and presented for the 5-9 year interval, the EAR was statistically significantly (P or = 35 age groups, respectively), which may be associated with modifications in chemotherapy.
PubMed ID
16449681 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among male Norwegian asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18719
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Britt Grethe Randem
Sverre Langård
Inge Dale
Johny Kongerud
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Oslo, Norway. britt.randem@rikshospitalet.no
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2003 Jan;43(1):88-95
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Humans
Hydrocarbons
Incidence
Inhalation Exposure
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The main objective of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to bitumen fumes could enhance the risk of cancer in asphalt workers. METHODS: A historical prospective cohort study was performed including 8,763 male asphalt workers from all main asphalt companies in Norway. Name, date of birth, and unique personal identification number, address, job type, and start and stop of employment in specific jobs was obtained for the workers. Information was complied from payroll and personnel records in the companies. The cohort was then linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway, which has complete records of individual cases of cancer in the Norwegian population since 1953. Follow-up was from 1 January 1970 to 31 December 1997. The 5-year age and period adjusted general male population in Norway served as reference population. RESULTS: Lung cancer was found elevated with standardized incidence ratio (SIR) = 1.3 (95% confidence intervals (CI) = 1.1, 1.7) in the overall analysis. Lung cancer was found more elevated in workers first exposed in the 1950s and 1960s and in mastic asphalt workers (SIR = 4.2, 95% CI = 1.2, 10, based on four cases) and pavers (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.0, 1.9). There was a deficiency in the incidence of malignant melanoma with 13 cases versus 26 expected. CONCLUSIONS: Risk of lung cancer was found enhanced among the asphalt workers. Some of the enhanced risk could probably be explained by the smoking habits of the workers. Exposure to coal tar may also have contributed to the enhanced risk.
PubMed ID
12494425 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among members of the Norwegian trade union of insulation workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17975
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;46(1):84-9
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Humans
Incidence
Labor Unions
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Insulation work has been described as an occupation with high exposure to asbestos. A cohort of members of the Norwegian Trade Union of Insulation Workers (n = 1116), hired between 1930 and 1975, was established. During 2002, the cohort was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of pleural mesothelioma was 12.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 6.0-24.6). Two cases with peritoneal mesotheliomas were found (SIR, 14.8; 95% CI = 1.8-53.4). The SIR of lung cancer was 3.0 (95% CI = 2.3-3.8). Four cases of lung cancer were observed among cork workers without any exposure to asbestos, but to cork dust and tar smoke (SIR, 5.3; 95% CI = 1.5-13.6). Our study showed a high risk of mesothelioma and an elevated risk of lung cancer among members of the Trade Union of Insulation Workers.
PubMed ID
14724482 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among workers in the asbestos-cement producing industry in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18673
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Grete Damberg
Axel Wannag
Gunnar Mowe
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway. bente.ulvestad@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Dec;28(6):411-7
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects - classification
Asbestos, Amphibole - adverse effects
Asbestos, Crocidolite - adverse effects
Asbestos, Serpentine - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Risk factors
Time
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cancer among employees of a Norwegian asbestos-cement factory was studied in relation to duration of exposure and time since first exposure. The factory was active in 1942-1968. Most of the asbestos in use was chrysotile, but for technical reasons 8% amphiboles was added. METHODS: For the identification of cancer cases, a cohort of 541 male workers was linked to the Cancer Registry of Norway. The analysis was based on the comparison between the observed and expected number of cancer cases. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated. Period of first employment, duration of employment, and time since first employment were used as indicators of exposure. Poisson regression analysis was used for the internal comparisons. RESULTS: The standardized incidence ratio was 52.5 (95% CI 31.1-83.0) for pleural mesothelioma, on the basis of 18 cases. The highest standardized incidence ratio was found for workers first employed in the earliest production period (SIR 99.0, 95% CI 51.3-173). No peritoneal mesothelioma was found. The standardized incidence ratio for lung cancer was 3.1 (95% CI 2.14.3), but no dose-response effect was observed. The ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer cases was 1:2. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed a high incidence of mesothelioma and a high ratio of mesothelioma to lung cancer among asbestos-cement workers. The high incidence of mesothelioma was probably due to the fact that a relatively high proportion of amphiboles was used in the production process.
PubMed ID
12539801 View in PubMed
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Cancer in persons working in dry cleaning in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16481
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Feb;114(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Elsebeth Lynge
Aage Andersen
Lars Rylander
Håkan Tinnerberg
Marja-Liisa Lindbohm
Eero Pukkala
Pål Romundstad
Per Jensen
Lene Bjørk Clausen
Kristina Johansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. elsebeth@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2006 Feb;114(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
U.S. studies have reported an increased risk of esophageal and some other cancers in dry cleaners exposed to tetrachloroethylene. We investigated whether the U.S. findings could be reproduced in the Nordic countries using a series of case-control studies nested in cohorts of laundry and dry-cleaning workers identified from the 1970 censuses in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland. Dry-cleaning work in the Nordic countries during the period when tetrachloroethylene was the dominant solvent was not associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer [rate ratio (RR) = 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34-1.69], but our study was hampered by some unclassifiable cases. The risks of cancer of the gastric cardia, liver, pancreas, and kidney and non-Hodgkin lymphoma were not significantly increased.Assistants in dry-cleaning shops had a borderline significant excess risk of cervical cancer not found in women directly involved in dry cleaning. We found an excess risk of bladder cancer (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.07-1.93) not associated with length of employment. The finding of no excess risk of esophageal cancer in Nordic dry cleaners differs from U.S. findings. Chance, differences in level of exposure to tetrachloroethylene, and confounding may explain the findings. The overall evidence on bladder cancer in dry cleaners is equivocal.
PubMed ID
16451857 View in PubMed
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Cancer in the Norwegian printing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17168
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Feb;31(1):36-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Bård M N Kvam
Pål Rikard Romundstad
Paolo Boffetta
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. baard.kvam@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Feb;31(1):36-43
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Book Industry
Cohort Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupations
Printing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate cancer risk among Norwegian workers in the printing industry, particularly lung and bladder cancer. METHODS: Cancer incidence was investigated from 1953 through 1998 in a cohort of 10 549 male members of a trade union in the printing industry in Oslo and nearby areas. Rates from the region, were used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIR) separately for the skilled and unskilled workers. Smoking data from a sample of the cohort were utilized for evaluating the risk estimates of smoking-related cancers. Specific exposure data were not available. RESULTS: Among the skilled workers, significantly elevated risks of cancer of the urinary bladder [standardized incidence ratio (SIR) 1.47, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.19-1.79], liver (SIR 1.92, 95% CI 1.15-2.99), pancreas (SIR 1.46, 95% CI 1.07-1.94) and colon (SIR 1.27, 95% CI 1.05-1.55) were observed, whereas an increased risk of lung cancer in this group was confined to those born before 1910. Among the unskilled workers, there were significantly increased risks of cancer of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and all sites. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that workers in the printing industry were at increased risk of several types of cancer. In particular the increased risk of bladder cancer among the skilled workers is suggestive of an occupational cause. However, no specific agent could be identified as an occupational carcinogen. The results did not support the hypothesis of a generally increased risk of lung cancer. The risk pattern for unskilled workers may reflect confounding by nonoccupational factors.
PubMed ID
15751617 View in PubMed
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Cancer of the gastrointestinal tract and exposure to asbestos in drinking water among lighthouse keepers (Norway).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16928
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Jun;16(5):593-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Kristina Kjaerheim
Bente Ulvestad
Jan Ivar Martinsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Montebello, N-0310, Oslo, Norway. kk@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Jun;16(5):593-8
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestos - adverse effects - analysis
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Mineral Fibers - adverse effects - analysis
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poisson Distribution
Risk assessment
Rural Population
Water Pollutants, Chemical - adverse effects - analysis
Water supply
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Previous studies of predominantly ecological design have indicated a possible elevation of gastrointestinal cancer risk in population groups exposed to drinking water contaminated with asbestos from natural sources or asbestos-cement containing water pipes. In the present study the possible effect of ingested asbestos fibers on gastrointestinal cancer risk was investigated in an occupational group where a proportion of the employees was exposed to asbestos in their drinking water. METHOD: A cohort of 726 lighthouse keepers first employed between 1917 and 1967 were followed up for cancer incidence from 1960 to 2002. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated as the number of new cancer cases divided by the expected number based on five-year age and sex specific incidence rates in the general rural population of Norway. A 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated for all SIR values assuming a Poisson distribution of the cancer cases. RESULTS: Risk of stomach cancer was elevated in the whole cohort (SIR: 1.6, CI: 1.0-2.3), in the subgroup with definite asbestos exposure (SIR: 2.5, CI: 0.9-5.5), and when the group was followed for 20 years and more after first possible exposure (SIR: 1.7, CI: 1.1-2.7). Less consistent results were found for colon cancer; SIR was 1.5 (CI: 0.9-2.2) overall, 0.8 (CI: 0.1-2.9) among the exposed, and 1.6 (CI: 1.0-2.5) twenty years and more after first possible exposure. CONCLUSION: The results support the hypothesis of an association between ingested asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer risk in general and stomach cancer risk specifically.
PubMed ID
15986115 View in PubMed
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Can lung cancer risk among nickel refinery workers be explained by occupational exposures other than nickel?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17215
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 Mar;16(2):146-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Tom K Grimsrud
Steinar R Berge
Tor Haldorsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, Montebello, Oslo, Norway. tom.k.grimsrud@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Epidemiology. 2005 Mar;16(2):146-54
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Arsenic - adverse effects
Asbestos - poisoning
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Metallurgy
Nickel - chemistry - poisoning
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solubility
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exposures in nickel refineries represent complex chemical mixtures, but only the effect of nickel has been evaluated quantitatively in epidemiologic studies of nickel workers. METHODS: For a Norwegian refinery, time- and department-specific exposure estimates were developed for arsenic, sulfuric acid mists, and cobalt in air on the basis of personal measurements and chemical data on raw materials and process intermediates. Exposure to asbestos, as well as employment in high-risk occupations outside the refinery, were assessed. We conducted a case-control study nested in a cohort of refinery workers, with 213 cases (diagnosed 1952-1995) and 525 age-matched controls. We analyzed lung cancer risk, adjusted for smoking, by cumulative exposure and duration of work. RESULTS: There was a substantial association between cumulative exposure to water-soluble nickel and lung cancer risk. Weaker effects were suggested for exposure to arsenic at the refinery and for occupational exposures outside the refinery for 15 years or more. No detectable excess risk was found for refinery exposure to asbestos or sulfuric acid mists, and no dose-related increase in risk was seen from cobalt. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to water-soluble nickel remained the most likely explanation for the excess lung cancer risk in the cohort. Other occupational exposures did not confound the strong dose-related effect of nickel to any appreciable degree.
PubMed ID
15703528 View in PubMed
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Exposure to different forms of nickel and risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18737
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Dec 15;156(12):1123-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2002
Author
Tom K Grimsrud
Steinar R Berge
Tor Haldorsen
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-based Cancer Research, N-0310 Oslo, Norway. tom.k.grimsrud@kreftregisteret.no
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Dec 15;156(12):1123-32
Date
Dec-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified nickel compounds as carcinogenic to humans, but it is still not known with certainty which forms of nickel pose the risk. In a case-control study of Norwegian nickel-refinery workers, the authors examined dose-related associations between lung cancer and cumulative exposure to four forms of nickel: water-soluble, sulfidic, oxidic, and metallic. A job-exposure matrix was based on personal measurements of total nickel in air and quantification of the four forms of nickel in dusts and aerosols. Data on smoking habits were collected for 213 cases identified in the Cancer Registry of Norway between 1952 and 1995 and 525 age-matched controls (94% participation rate). The nickel exposures were moderately to highly correlated. A clear dose-related effect was seen for water-soluble nickel (odds ratio = 1.7 per unit in the log(e)-transformed exposure, ln[(cumulative exposure) + 1], originally given in (mg/m(3)) x years (95% confidence interval: 1.3, 2.2)). A general rise in risk from other types of nickel could not be excluded, but no further dose-dependent increase was seen. Smoking was a weak to moderate confounder. The study suggests an important role of water-soluble nickel species in nickel-related cancer.
PubMed ID
12480657 View in PubMed
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Incidence trends of mesothelioma in Norway, 1965-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18248
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Oct 20;107(1):94-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2003
Author
Bente Ulvestad
Kristina Kjaerheim
Bjørn Møller
Aage Andersen
Author Affiliation
Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. bente.ulvestad@krefregisteret.no
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Oct 20;107(1):94-8
Date
Oct-20-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Asbestos exposure is considered to be the only important risk factor for malignant mesothelioma. The importation of asbestos to Norway increased after World War II and peaked in 1970. Stringent regulations took effect in 1977, and importation and use of asbestos practically ended in Norway in the late 1970s, until importation was prohibited in 1982. Our study aimed to analyze the incidence of mesothelioma in Norway according to temporal variation, to study the consequences of the use of asbestos and the asbestos ban effectiveness. An age-period-cohort model was used to analyze time trends for pleural mesotheliomas. From 1965-1999, the annual number of pleural mesotheliomas rose gradually both in males and females, and the highest annual number of pleural mesotheliomas was recorded in 1999 with 73 new cases diagnosed. The age-adjusted log linear drift of malignant mesothelioma of the pleura during the observation period rose 31.1% per 5 years among men and 15.9% among women. In 1995-1999, the age-adjusted incidence rate for men was 16.6 per million person-years for men and 2.3 for women. Cohort-specific risks increased for men born up to around 1935. After this the risks seem to stabilize. The rates were determined by age and by birth cohort. The delayed period effect of the asbestos regulation by the late 1970s will probably have its greatest effects on the mesothelioma rates around 2010.
PubMed ID
12925962 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.